Welcome to the course – SSH Data Management and the FAIR principles -II

In this course you will get a thorough introduction to the importance of a data management plan (DMP) and how to create one. Moreover, the course will introduce the FAIR principles and how to implement them in your research. 

The course objective is thus to promote good research practices by helping the participant make informed choices in relation to planning and executing research processes such as data collecting, data analysis, data storing and sharing.  

The course will be split into two workshops aimed at supporting the individual PhD student in planning the data handling that is inherent to the PhD project.  

Be aware that the course includes homework. Before the first day of teaching, 4 hours of homework is expected to get an introduction to the topics and materials, and then 15 hours of homework drafting a DMP and working on a dataset is to be expected between 1st and 2nd day of teaching. At sign-up, participants will be enrolled in both workshops, and attendance at both are required.  

Teaching day #1                             

Welcome and introduction to the course Data Management and the FAIR principles 
FAIR principles (making data that is Findable, Accessible, Interoperable and Reusable) 
Exercise LEGO 
What is a DMP and why is it important? 
Introduction to AAU generic DMP template 
Question 1-4 on the DMP template 
Question 5-8 on the DMP template 
Workshop 
Questions and explanation of homework. 

Teaching day #2 

Welcome and status on homework 
How did you make the dataset FAIR? 
How did you approach making your own DMP? 
Closing, including the option of individual follow up arrangements.  

Homework before 1st day of teaching (estimated time requirement: 4 hours):  

To get a basic understanding of data management and the FAIR principles, please look at the following links and make the exercises prior to the first day of teaching: 

1.      Welcome to DeiC DMP. - in this link, you will find a tool for creating DMP’s, as well as different templates for DMP’s. Please create an account before we meet for the first day of teaching. Here is a guide for creating an account and an introduction to the AAU generic DMP template: DMP AAU template.mp4.  

2.      https://howtofair.dk/what-is-fair/ - in this link, you will find an introduction to the FAIR principles. Please read the information contained in this link and watch the three videos at the bottom - module 1 (Introduction), module 2 (FAIR principles) and module 3 (Data Management Plans). 
 

3.      https://howtofair.dk/why-fair/ - in this link, you will find an introduction to the purpose of knowing and using the FAIR principles. Please read the information contained in this link and watch the four videos with Susanna and Barend. 

4.      https://howtofair.dk/how-to-fair/ - in this link, you will get an introduction to how you can make your research data more FAIR by taking you through six FAIRification practices. Please read the information contained in this link and watch the four videos with research projects used as examples. Moreover, you must also read the six attached documents in the bottom of the link. 
 

5.      https://fair-office.at/lernen-sie-mehr/?lang=en – in this link, you will find nine videos lasting between 5-10 minutes. Please watch eight of the nine videos prior to the course (not the video on metadata, as it is in German). 

6.      https://howtofair.dk/quiz/ - in this link, you will find three quizzes. One on qualitative, one on quantitative and one on sensitive quantitative data. Please go through all three and please note, that you will not be held accountable for you correct/incorrect answers during the course. 

 Homework before 2nd day of teaching (estimated time requirement: 15 hours in total): 

1. The following two exercises need to be done between the 1st and 2nd day of teaching: FAIRification of data 

For this exercise you must use this dataset; https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.7d7wm37wp. 

Please evaluate the FAIRness of the dataset, using following guide to refresh the principles; “How FAIR are your data[1] ”; https://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.1065991Go through each of the letters in FAIR and assess, whether the dataset follows the four principles. 

2. Start writing your own Data Management Plan 

Start writing a DMP on your Ph.D. project. Use the AAU generic template to write your DMP. You will find the template at DMPonline. You do not have to hand in your data management plan or send us anything. We will talk about your data management plan in groups on day 2 of teaching.  

The first version does not have to be perfect or done. If you need inspiration to start writing your DMP, you can have a look at the following materials for inspiration. 

 

Materials for inspiration: 

1.      You can use the following guidance from Science Europe to help reflect on what to write in the different questions of your Data Management Plan; https://scienceeurope.org/media/4brkxxe5/se_rdm_practical_guide_extended_final.pdf 

2.      You can browse through existing Data Management Plans for inspiration: 

-          REPAIR draft Data Management Plan 

-          Data Management Plan: Empowering Indigenous Peoples and Knowledge Systems Related to Climate Change and Intellectual Property Rights 

 Additional reading 

 Below you will find suggestions for additional reading materials. This is not part of the 15 hours dedicated for homework and therefore voluntary.  

-          A FAIRy tale; https://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.2248200      

-          FAIR Principles: Interpretations and Implementation Considerations: https://doi.org/10.1162/dint_r_00024 

-          A basic introduction to Data management; Managing and sharing research data: a guide to good practice. Corti, Louise, author. 2020; 2nd edition – you can get this book at AUB. 

Organizer:  
CLAAUDIA CLAAUDIA - Aalborg University 
 
Lecturers:  
Dagmar Knudsen Fallesen 
Kamilla Hall Kragelund 
Thomas Andersen 
Dennis Aagaard Pedersen 

ECTS: 1 

Time 18 April and 2 May 2024

Place: Aalborg University

Zip code 9220

City Aalborg 

Number of seats: 14

Deadline 28 March 2024

For inquiries regarding registration, cancellation or waiting list, please contact the PhD administration, aauphd@adm.aau.dk. 

 
Important information concerning PhD courses: 
We have over some time experienced problems with no-show for both project and general courses. It has now reached a point where we are forced to take action. Therefore, the Doctoral School has decided to introduce a no-show fee of DKK 3.000 for each course where the student does not show up. Cancellations are accepted no later than 1 week before start of the course. Registered illness is of course an acceptable reason for not showing up on those days. Furthermore, all courses open for registration approximately four months before start. This can hopefully also provide new students a chance to register for courses during the year. We look forward to your registrations. 


The Nordic-Baltic Doctoral Network in Social Work

is inviting doctoral students from Nordic, Baltic and countries beyond

to participate in the XV Summer School

 

August 19-23, 2024, at Aalborg University, Denmark

 

The Nordic-Baltic Doctoral Network in Social Work (NBSW) is a joint network of doctoral schools, universities, and other institutions in social work in seven countries. The network provides research training for PhD students in social work in Finland, Sweden, Norway, Denmark, Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania, and other countries.

We invite PhD students to participate in the summer school of the Nordic-Baltic Doctoral Network in Social Work (NBSW). This summer school aims to bring together PhD candidates in social work from Nordic and Baltic countries and countries beyond for five days of intensive lectures and thorough discussions focusing on research about and with people in vulnerable positions.

Participation in the summer school is free of charge, however, submission of a paper connected with the theme of the summer school is a prerequisite for participation. 


Research about and with people in vulnerable positions

The 2024 summer school will focus on research about and co-creation with people in vulnerable positions. The course provides 5 ECTS credits and has been developed especially for this summer school.

 Research has during the last decades focused more and more on giving voices to and collaborating with people in vulnerable positions – both as informants and as stakeholders in the research process. This focus and the associated processes have challenged both the more traditional perception of informants as objectives in the research process and the researchers’ position as the person managing the research process alone or together with colleagues from academia. Besides it has entailed different and new ethical and practical dilemmas in the research process when involving or co-producing with people who are stigmatized and/or challenged by several physical, mental and/or social issues in their lives.

 The summer school will be based on key-note presentations, the participants’ research experiences/reflections and the papers produced by participants for the summer school. The key-note presentations, the discussions and the papers will all focus on the possibilities and the challenges when including people in vulnerable positions as informants and as stakeholders.

The keynotes will present methodological, theoretical, ethical, and experienced-based issues within the overall topic and will through discussions include participants’ experiences. This will be further explored in the parallel sessions where students’ papers will be discussed and given feedback from senior researchers and participating doctoral students in smaller groups. All student papers must relate to both their research and the overall topic of the summer school. 

 The summer school will each day contain a mixture of keynote presentations related to the perspectives of the overall topic and workshops where the PhD students present and discuss their papers under the guidance of experienced researchers or keynote speakers. Paper will receive feedback from fellow doctoral students and 1-2 senior researchers during the summer school. 


TIME

Start Monday, August 19, 2024, at 14:00 CET.

End Friday, August 23, 2024, at 12:30 CET


PLACE

Aalborg University, Department of Sociology and Social Work https://www.en.soc.aau.dk/

Summer school venue: Hotel Højgaarden, Slettestrandvej 50, 9690 Fjerritslev, Denmark http://www.hojgaarden.dk/

 

PRICE

The prize is all-inclusive covering transportation from and to the airport (42 km each way), accommodation and all meals (breakfast, lunch, dinner, coffee breaks) during the summer school. Single room: 3800 Danish kroner (€470). Sharing a double room: 3400 Danish kroner (€455) pr. person.

Participation in the summer school is free.

 

NUMBER OF PARTICIPANTS

The maximum number of participants is 25.

The international NBSW Steering Committee will assess all applications and make the final selection of participants.  

 

ORGANISING COMMITTEE

The XV Nordic-Baltic Doctoral Network Summer School is organised by Aalborg University in cooperation with the coordination group of the Nordic-Baltic Doctoral Network in Social Work.

 

APPLICATION FORM

 Please fill in the application until May 12, 2024 (midnight) at the latest:

Link to course and application form: https://phd.moodle.aau.dk/course/view.php?id=2458

 

PRELIMINARY PAPER INSTRUCTIONS

Paper: 5 ECTS credits (4000-5000 words)

Papers and presentations must connect the participant’s doctoral research project with the theme of the summer school.

 

KEY DATES:

Application deadline:                               12 May at midnight

Decision about participation:                  31 May

Literature list for reading:                        31 May

Registration deadline:                             14 June

Paper submission deadline:                    22 July 3 pm CET

Summer School start:                              19 August

 

CONTACT:

Lars Uggerhøj                                          Mette Rømer

Professor of Social Work                         Associated Professor of Social Work

lug@socsci.aau.dk                                   romer@socsci.aau.dk

Welcome to the course – SSH Data Management and the FAIR principles -I

In this course you will get a thorough introduction to the importance of a data management plan (DMP) and how to create one. Moreover, the course will introduce the FAIR principles and how to implement them in your research. 

The course objective is thus to promote good research practices by helping the participant make informed choices in relation to planning and executing research processes such as data collecting, data analysis, data storing and sharing.  

The course will be split into two workshops aimed at supporting the individual PhD student in planning the data handling that is inherent to the PhD project.  

Be aware that the course includes homework. Before the first day of teaching, 4 hours of homework is expected to get an introduction to the topics and materials, and then 15 hours of homework drafting a DMP and working on a dataset is to be expected between 1st and 2nd day of teaching. At sign-up, participants will be enrolled in both workshops, and attendance at both are required.  

Teaching day #1                             

Welcome and introduction to the course Data Management and the FAIR principles 
FAIR principles (making data that is Findable, Accessible, Interoperable and Reusable) 
Exercise LEGO 
What is a DMP and why is it important? 
Introduction to AAU generic DMP template 
Question 1-4 on the DMP template 
Question 5-8 on the DMP template 
Workshop 
Questions and explanation of homework. 

Teaching day #2 

Welcome and status on homework 
How did you make the dataset FAIR? 
How did you approach making your own DMP? 
Closing, including the option of individual follow up arrangements.  

Homework before 1st day of teaching (estimated time requirement: 4 hours):  

To get a basic understanding of data management and the FAIR principles, please look at the following links and make the exercises prior to the first day of teaching: 

1.      Welcome to DeiC DMP. - in this link, you will find a tool for creating DMP’s, as well as different templates for DMP’s. Please create an account before we meet for the first day of teaching. Here is a guide for creating an account and an introduction to the AAU generic DMP template: DMP AAU template.mp4.  

2.      https://howtofair.dk/what-is-fair/ - in this link, you will find an introduction to the FAIR principles. Please read the information contained in this link and watch the three videos at the bottom - module 1 (Introduction), module 2 (FAIR principles) and module 3 (Data Management Plans). 
 

3.      https://howtofair.dk/why-fair/ - in this link, you will find an introduction to the purpose of knowing and using the FAIR principles. Please read the information contained in this link and watch the four videos with Susanna and Barend. 

4.      https://howtofair.dk/how-to-fair/ - in this link, you will get an introduction to how you can make your research data more FAIR by taking you through six FAIRification practices. Please read the information contained in this link and watch the four videos with research projects used as examples. Moreover, you must also read the six attached documents in the bottom of the link. 
 

5.      https://fair-office.at/lernen-sie-mehr/?lang=en – in this link, you will find nine videos lasting between 5-10 minutes. Please watch eight of the nine videos prior to the course (not the video on metadata, as it is in German). 

6.      https://howtofair.dk/quiz/ - in this link, you will find three quizzes. One on qualitative, one on quantitative and one on sensitive quantitative data. Please go through all three and please note, that you will not be held accountable for you correct/incorrect answers during the course. 

 

 Homework before 2nd day of teaching (estimated time requirement: 15 hours in total): 

1. The following two exercises need to be done between the 1st and 2nd day of teaching: FAIRification of data 

For this exercise you must use this dataset; https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.7d7wm37wp. 

Please evaluate the FAIRness of the dataset, using following guide to refresh the principles; “How FAIR are your data[1] ”; https://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.1065991Go through each of the letters in FAIR and assess, whether the dataset follows the four principles. 

2. Start writing your own Data Management Plan 

Start writing a DMP on your Ph.D. project. Use the AAU generic template to write your DMP. You will find the template at DMPonline. You do not have to hand in your data management plan or send us anything. We will talk about your data management plan in groups on day 2 of teaching.  

The first version does not have to be perfect or done. If you need inspiration to start writing your DMP, you can have a look at the following materials for inspiration. 

 

Materials for inspiration: 

1.      You can use the following guidance from Science Europe to help reflect on what to write in the different questions of your Data Management Plan; https://scienceeurope.org/media/4brkxxe5/se_rdm_practical_guide_extended_final.pdf 

2.      You can browse through existing Data Management Plans for inspiration: 

-          REPAIR draft Data Management Plan 

-          Data Management Plan: Empowering Indigenous Peoples and Knowledge Systems Related to Climate Change and Intellectual Property Rights 

 

 Additional reading 

 Below you will find suggestions for additional reading materials. This is not part of the 15 hours dedicated for homework and therefore voluntary.  

-          A FAIRy tale; https://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.2248200      

-          FAIR Principles: Interpretations and Implementation Considerations: https://doi.org/10.1162/dint_r_00024 

-          A basic introduction to Data management; Managing and sharing research data: a guide to good practice. Corti, Louise, author. 2020; 2nd edition – you can get this book at AUB. 


Organizer:  
CLAAUDIA CLAAUDIA - Aalborg University 
 
Lecturers:  
Dagmar Knudsen Fallesen 
Kamilla Hall Kragelund 
Thomas Andersen 
Dennis Aagaard Pedersen 

ECTS: 1 

Time 11 April and 25 April 2024

Place: Aalborg University

Zip code 9220

City Aalborg

Number of seats: 14

Deadline 21 March 2024

 For inquiries regarding registration, cancellation or waiting list, please contact the PhD administration, aauphd@adm.aau.dk. 

 
Important information concerning PhD courses: 
We have over some time experienced problems with no-show for both project and general courses. It has now reached a point where we are forced to take action. Therefore, the Doctoral School has decided to introduce a no-show fee of DKK 3.000 for each course where the student does not show up. Cancellations are accepted no later than 1 week before start of the course. Registered illness is of course an acceptable reason for not showing up on those days. Furthermore, all courses open for registration approximately four months before start. This can hopefully also provide new students a chance to register for courses during the year. We look forward to your registrations. 


Enrolment requirements: 

Before the start of the course, participants must send a short (half to full page) description of their research project, including possible links to visual methods.  Three months after the course, participants are expected to write a short paper on their research that can later be submitted for publication.  Wagoner will provide feedback to students on their written work to help them get it published. 

Description

4 ECTS

Lecturers:

Brady Wagoner

Caroline Demuth

Sarah Awad

Eric Jensen

Location: Nordkraft, 9000 Aalborg - room to follow

This four-day course introduces different perspectives and techniques in visual methods. It provides practical guidance for visual data collection, analysis and dissemination, which includes such techniques as working with various visual props, annotated drawings, photo-elicitation, using first- and third-person video, among others. There will also be focused discussions of and feedback on students’ research projects, in relation to visual methods. The course as a whole makes the general argument that visual material can be used both as a powerful complement to traditional verbal and textual data, as well as a site of investigation in its own right. 

Day 1. Introduction and photo-elicitation

10.00-10.45 Introduction and overview of visual methods-- Brady Wagoner and Sarah H. Awad

10.45-12.30 Visuals in science communication and evaluation research--Eric Jensen

12.30-13.30 Lunch

13:30-15:00 The social life of images, including photo elicitation techniques – Sarah H. Awad

15:00-15:30 Coffee break

15:00-17:00 Photo-elicitation techniques exercises — Sarah H. Awad and Brady Wagoner

 

Day 2. Annotated drawings, including mental maps

9.30-12:30 Lecture and exercises with annotated drawing methods, using empirical examples from research on zoos, museums, mental maps of cities and creative work spaces—Eric Jensen

12:30-13:30 Lunch

13:30-15:
00 Mental maps, followed by discussion--Brady Wagoner

15:00-15:30 Coffee break

15:30-17:00 Discussion of student projects


Day 3. Using and analyzing third-person video

9.30-12:00 Lecture on multimodal analysis of video material--Carolin Demuth

12:00-13:00 Lunch

13:
00-14:30 Further discussion and exercises analyzing videos--Carolin Demuth

14:30-15:00 Coffee break

15:00-17:00 Discussion of student projects

 

Day 4. Using and analyzing first-person video, with the subjective camera methodology

9.30-12:00 Lecture on subjective camera technology—Brady Wagoner

12:00-13:00 Lunch

13:00-15:00 Discussion of student projects


Key literature:

Day 1

Awad, S. H. & Wagoner, B. (2018). Image Politics of the Arab Uprisings. In Wagoner, B., Moghaddam, F. & Valsiner, J. (Eds). The Psychology of Radical Social Change: From Rage to Revolution. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. [20 pp]

Berger, J (1972). Ways of Seeing. Penguin: London [166 pp].

*Radley, A. (2010). What people do with pictures, Visual Studies, 25, 267-279 [22 pp]

Reavey, P. (2021). Handbook of Visual methods in psychology. New York: Psychology Press (incl. ch. 1, 2, 4, 7, 22, 28, 32) [235 pp]

*Rose, G. (2008) Visual Methodologies. London: Routledge (Chapter 1) [32 pp] 

Day 2

Awad, S. H. & Wagoner, B. (2018). Image Politics of the Arab Uprisings. In Wagoner, B., Moghaddam, F. & Valsiner, J. (Eds). The Psychology of Radical Social Change: From Rage to Revolution. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. [20 pp]

Jensen, E. & Laurie, C. (2017). Doing Real Social Research. London: Sage (pages 296-301) [7 pp]

Lonchuk, M. & Rosa, A. (2011). Voices of graphic art images. In Märtsin, M., Wagoner, B., Aveling, E. L., Kadianaki, I., & Whittaker, L. (Eds), Dialogicality in focus: Challenges to theory, method and application. Nova Science Publishers. [17 pp] 

Day 3

Demuth, C. (2012). Video-based Discourse and Conversation Analysis in Cultural Developmental Psychology: Mother-Infant Interactions in Kikaikelaki, Cameroon and Muenster, Germany. In: Karin Schweizer, Tanja Schielein, Mechthild Kiegelmann, Tiberio Feliz, & Guenter Huber (Eds). Qualitative Psychology Nexus, Vol. IX: Beyond text: Video and other Medium Use in Qualitative Research. Center for Qualitative Psychology, pp. 31-52. Available at: http://psydok.sulb.uni-saarland.de/volltexte/2012/3417/

Paasch, B. S. Raudaskoski, P. L. (2018). Multimodal Interaktionsanalyse. In: Davidsen, J. & Kjær, M (eds.). Videoanalyse af social interaktion. p. 151-184, Samfundslitteratur

Raudaskoski, P. L. & Kjær, M. (2016). Interaktionsanalyse. In: Horsbøl, A. & Raudaskoski, P. (eds.). Diskurs og praksis: teori, metode og analyse. 1. ed, p. 111-134.. Samfundslitteratur (Metoder i samfundsvidenskab og humaniora; No. 1).

Wiggins, Sally (2017). Discursive Psychology. Theory, Method and ApplicationsLondon: Sage

Day 4

*Wagoner, B. & Brescó, I., Herbig, L. (2022). Studying the stream of experience at memorial sites: The subjective camera methodology. In M. Watzlawik & S. Salden (Eds.), Courageous Methods in Cultural Psychology: Beyond the symbolic nature of language. New York: Springer.  [30 pp] 

Kusenbach, M. (2003). Street phenomenology. Ethnography, 4, 455-485. [30 pp] 

Lahlou, S. (2011). How can we capture the subject's perspective? An evidence-based approach for the social scientist. Social science information, 50(4), 607-655 [43 pp] 


Optional further readings:

Davidsen, J. & Krummheuer, A. (2018). Transkription af videodata. In: Malene Kjær and Jacob Davidsen (Eds.). Videoanalyse af social interaction, pp. 97-112, Samfundslitteratur

Demuth, C. (2018/2020) Videoanalysen. In: G. Mey & K. Mruck (Eds) Handbuch Qualitative Forschung in der Psychologie (2nd extended and revised edition), Heidelberg: Springer Reference Psychologie. https://meteor.springer.com/container/contribute.jsf?id=114469

Demuth, C. (2021). Managing Accountability of Children’s Bodily Conduct: Embodied Discursive Practices in Preschool. In: Sally Wiggins & Karin Osvaldsson Cromdal (eds). Discursive psychology and embodiment: Beyond subject-object binaries. Pp. 81-111, Palgrave Macmillan

Goodwin, C. (2000) Action and embodiment within situated human interaction. Journal of Pragmatics, 32: 1489-1522

Paasch, B. S. & Raudaskoski, P. L. (2018). Multimodal Interaktionsanalyse. In: Davidsen, J. & Kjær, M (eds.). Videoanalyse af social interaktion. p. 151-184, Samfundslitteratur

Raudaskoski, P. L. (2010) Observationsmetoder (herunder videoobservation). In S. Brinkmann & L. Tanggaard (eds.). Håndbog i de kvalitative metoder. København : Hans Reitzels Forlag: 81-96.


Undervisere: Lene Tanggaard Pedersen og Svend Brinkmann

Krav til tilmelding (deadline: 1. oktober 2024) 

Sendes til hannepc@ikp.aau.dk: 1-2 sides motiveret ansøgning med projektbeskrivelse, der fokuserer på projektets kvalitative elementer. Kursets deltagere udvælges på baggrund af ansøgningen.

Sted: 9000 Aalborg - lokale følger.

Beskrivelse:

4 ECTS

5-dages kursus som introducerer til kvalitativ forskning. To af de fem dage vil fokusere specifikt og intensivt på det kvalitative forskningsinterview med en blanding af teori og praktiske øvelser, og en dag handler om feltarbejde og deltagende observation. De øvrige dage tematiserer bl.a. forskningsetik og præsenterer nogle nyere tilgange til kvalitativ forskning. Der vil kurset igennem være fokus på kvalitativ forskning som et håndværk, der læres bedst gennem øvelse. Formiddagene består af forelæsninger og lærerstyrede øvelser, mens eftermiddagene organiseres af kursisterne selv i grupper.

Alle deltagere bliver opdelt i fem faste temagrupper, som mødes hver eftermiddag under kurset. I forarbejdet til kurset indgår, ud over læsningen af kursuslitteraturen, at hver temagruppe for­bereder eftermiddagens arbejde til en af kursusdagene. Deltagernes projekter kan også inddrages, men er ikke tænkt som hovedtema.

Mandag

10:00 – 11:00   Introduktion til kvalitativ forskning v/ Svend Brinkmann

11:00 – 13:00   Etik i kvalitativ forskning v/ Svend Brinkmann

13:00 – 14:00   Frokost

14:00 – 15:00   Gruppediskussioner med udgangspunkt i formiddagens præsentationer og egne pro­jekter.

15:10 – 16:00   Tilbagemelding til plenum

16:00 – 17:00   Evt. mulighed for konsultation for interesserede

Litteratur til dagen:

Kvale, S. & Brinkmann, S. (2015). Interview: Introduktion til et håndværk (3. udg.). København: Hans Reitzels Forlag. (kapitel 1-5)

Brinkmann, S. & Tanggaard, L. (2020). Kvalitative metoder, tilgange og perspektiver: En introduktion. In Brinkmann, S: & Tanggaard, L. (red.) Kvalitative metoder: En grundbog. København: Hans Reitzels Forlag.

Brinkmann, S. (2020). Etik i en kvalitativ verden. In Brinkmann, S. & Tanggaard, L. (red.) Kvalitative metoder: En grundbog. København: Hans Reitzels Forlag.

Tirsdag

09:00 – 11:00   Introduktion til det kvalitative forskningsinterview v/ Lene Tanggaard

11:00 – 13:00   Interview-variationer v/Lene Tanggaard

13:00 – 14:00   Frokost

14:00 – 15:00   Gruppediskussioner/-øvelser med udgangspunkt i formiddagens præsentationer og egne projekter.

15:10 – 16:00   Tilbagemelding til plenum

16:00 – 17:00   Evt. mulighed for konsultation for interesserede

Litteratur til dagen:

Kvale, S. & Brinkmann, S. (2015). Interview: Det kvalitative forskningsinterview som håndværk (3. udg.). København: Hans Reitzels Forlag. (kapitel 6-9)

Tanggaard, L. (2007). The research interview as discourses crossing swords – the researcher and apprentice on crossing roads. Qualitative Inquiry, 13(1): 160-176.

Onsdag

09:00 – 11:00   Analysemetoder og læsning af kvalitative forskningsinterviews v/Svend Brinkmann

11:00 – 13:00   Analysehåndværket v/Lene Tanggaard

13:00 – 14:00   Frokost

14:00 – 15:00   Gruppediskussioner/-øvelser med udgangspunkt i formiddagens præsentationer og egne projekter.

15:10 – 16:00   Tilbagemelding til plenum

16:00 – 17:00   Mulighed for konsultation for interesserede

Litteratur til dagen:

Kvale, S. & Brinkmann, S. (2015). Interview: Det kvalitative forskningsinterview som håndværk (3. udg.). København: Hans Reitzels Forlag. (kapitel 10-14)

Jacobsen, B., Tanggaard, L. & Brinkmann, S. (2020). Fænomenologi. In Brinkmann, S. & Tanggaard, L. (red.) Kvalitative metoder: En grundbog. København: Hans Reitzels Forlag.

Phillips, L. (2020). Diskursanalyse. In Brinkmann, S. & Tanggaard, L. (red.) Kvalitative metoder: En grundbog. København: Hans Reitzels Forlag.

Torsdag

09:00 – 13:00   Deltagende observation og etnografisk feltarbejde v/Lene Tanggaard

13:00 – 14:00   Frokost

14:00 – 15:00   Gruppediskussioner med udgangspunkt i formiddagens præsentationer og egne pro­jekter.

15.10 – 16:00   Tilbagemelding til plenum

16:00 – 17:00   Mulighed for konsultation for interesserede

Litteratur til dagen:

Hastrup, K. (2020). Feltarbejde. In Brinkmann, S. & Tanggaard, L. (red.) Kvalitative metoder: En grundbog. København: Hans Reitzels Forlag.

Raudaskoski, P. (2020). Observationsmetoder (herunder videoobservation). In Brinkmann, S. & Tanggaard, L. (red.) Kvalitative metoder: En grundbog. København: Hans Reitzels Forlag.

Czarniawska, B. (2020). Narratologi og feltstudier. In Brinkmann, S. & Tanggaard, L. (red.) Kvalitative metoder: En grundbog. København: Hans Reitzels Forlag.

Szulevicz, T. (2020). Deltagerobservation. In Brinkmann, S. & Tanggaard, L. (red.) Kvalitative metoder: En grundbog. København: Hans Reitzels Forlag.

Fredag

09:00 – 13:00   Formidling af kvalitativ forskning og aktuelle tilgange: Autoetnografi og litterære beskrivelser v/ Svend Brinkmann

13:00 – 14:00   Frokost

14:00 – 14:50   Gruppediskussioner med udgangspunkt i formiddagens præsentationer og egne pro­jekter.

15:00 – 15:45   Tilbagemelding til plenum

15:45 – 16:00   Evaluering og afslutning

 

Litteratur til dagen:

Baarts, C. (2020). Autoetnografi. In Brinkmann, S. & Tanggaard, L. (red.) Kvalitative metoder: En grundbog. København: Hans Reitzels Forlag.

Tanggaard, L. & Brinkmann, S. (2020). Formidling af kvalitativ forskning. In Brinkmann, S. & Tanggaard, L. (red.) Kvalitative metoder: En grundbog. København: Hans Reitzels Forlag.




  • Before the course:

    We will ask each participant to write and send a short description (4 pages) of their research project and describe in what way they find phenomenological dimensions in their research and what their main phenomenological question and wonderment currently is.

    After the course:

    We will ask each participant to make a 7-pages reflection on the notion of ‘Existential Health’ as they see it now, and where and how they see the relevance as well as challenges in working with existential healthcare communication through inspiration from aesthetical and philosophical  (contemplative) practices.


Description: 

In the research section ‘Arts, Aesthetics & Health’ at Department of Communication and Psychology, Aalborg University, we are in different ways inquiring into the relationship between how liberal arts, aesthetical experiences, and health (or well-being) might be interconnected.

In this four days PhD-seminar we will focus on the phenomenological and existential dimensions of communication and search for meaning in healthcare professions, and professions where both the interhuman (person- and human-centered), worldly and interspecies (nature- and phenomenon-led) care are central. 

For decades, professionals and researchers in healthcare and human-centered professions have called for a re-humanization in health, education and welfare. This has been described as responding to an unsettling tendency in these professions of feeling “out of tune with life” or “out of resonance” with the core values of their professions (Kitson et al. 2010; Galvin & Todres, 2013; Uhrenfeldt et al., 2018; Martinsen, 2018; Rosa, 2019; Hansen & Jørgensen, 2020). Lately, this quest for a re-humanization of health, education and welfare has now also been connected to a deeper ontological and existential connection with the world as such (Biesta, 2022; Dyring & Grøn, 2022, Dyring, 2023; Hansen, Eide & Leget, 2023).

The concept of Health and what it phenomenological is like to feel healthy in contrast to naturalistic theories of health have also for some years been connected to a state of “homelike being-in-the-world”(Sevenaeus, 2000, 2011, 2016), “Authentic Homecoming” (Galvin & Todres, 2013), “Existential Rootedness”(Ücok-Sayrak, 2019) or “Ontological Homecoming”(Hansen & Jørgensen, 2020; Hansen, Eide & Leget, 2023). 

However, what is meant by authentic or ontological “homecoming” or “world-centered”, “world-open” and “nature- and phenomenon-led” care differ because of different understandings of what an ontological and existential relation and resonance (Rosa, 2019) with the world is. Seen from an eco-phenomenological perspective: How are dignity, humanness, care ethics, care aesthetics (Thompson, 2023) and spiritual care as important concepts and practices in existential health communication to be understood from a non-anthropocentric world-care perspective? What is meant by health in existential and spiritual care if we need to involve such an eco-phenomenological approach (where health is more than what we mean by bio-medical (physical) health and psycho-sociological (mental) health? Why is it for example that Hans-Georg Gadamer in his reflections on truth, methods, and health (2004, 2006, 2007) puts such an emphasize on the experience of art and philosophy as portals to another ontological and existential connection to Being or Nature as such? Is it possible through deep experiences of wonder and presence that we as human being can learn to get into more healthy relation and resonance with the world and the meaningfulness, we may experience by co-being-in-the-world? 

On this PhD-course we are going especially to inquire into three questions: How do we in Existential Healthcare Communication work in theory and practice with a new notion of ‘Existential Health’ (or Existential Sustainability), which on the one hand is closely connected to what Hartmut Rosa coins as ‘Existential Resonance’(Rosa, 2019), and Svenaeus (2000) and Todres & Galvin (2010), and Hansen & Jørgensen (2020) through Heidegger (Heidegger, 1995) describe as a kind of “ontological homecoming”, and on the other hand with the experience of feeling connected to nature seen from an eco-phenomenological perspective (Sallis, 2016; Abram, 2017; Nelson, 2021;Verducci & Kule, 2022)? 

Why is it that especially ‘art experiences’ (song, music, art works, dance, poetry) and ‘philosophical experiences’ (such as philosophizing and wondrous conversations and dialogical communities of wonder) and sometimes also more spiritual rituals and practices seem to create a special kind of soul-nurturing and spirit-strengthening ‘non-time’ and ‘non-space’ when indwelling into existential questions and experiences of people in care, their relatives or of caretakers? How are we to understand the enigmatic relation between Health Humanities and Environmental Humanities, or between human health and planetary health (Wahl, 2006; 2016)?  

How do we do research on the existential, spiritual, and eco-phenomenological dimensions in healthcare communication? How can you through theoretical studies pave the way for new orientations in understanding existential care ethics and healthcare communication in a non-anthropocentric perspective that rests on ontology and phenomenology that puts the aesthetical and philosophical experiences in the center? And how do you do qualitative and empirical research on these subjects through practice phenomenology (Van Manen, 2014, 2023), action research (Dinkens & Hansen, 2016; Hansen, 2022) or art-based research (Visse, Hansen & Leget, 2019, 2020)?

Each lecturer on the course will take his/her departure from a specific healthcare context and health issue and show how he/she work in this context and with this health issue through aesthetical (or everyday creativity) experiences or/and philosophical (dialogical) experiences.

On the first day Carlo Leget and Mai-Britt Guldin will set the stage by a methodological reflection on existential and spiritual communication in healthcare in three lectures: 1) Introducing the healthcare sector as a place where different disciplines and paradigms meet. What are the challenges and obstacles for existential communication from a psychological perspective and from a spiritual perspective? 2) Crossing the boundaries of paradigms: How to connect knowledge from different disciplines and professions in healthcare: the example of the Integrated Process Model of loss and grief, its scientific foundation and its methodological underpinning; 3) Spirituality, hermeneutics and the arts: Focusing on the development of the Diamond Model for spiritual conversation (Leget, 2017, 2022, and 2023) the spiritual dimension will be explored, the importance of the non-cognitive dimensions of meaning, and the role of the arts, opening the way to a phenomenological approach.

On the second day Finn Thorbjørn Hansen and Rasmus Dyring will focus on what can be meant by existential health as “Ontological Homecoming” and ‘World- and Phenomenon-led Care”.

Hansen will take his departure on the research on ‘Culture on Prescription’ and the new notion of ‘Culture Medicine’. He will especially show how the phenomenology of wonder and practices of being in ‘Communities of Wonder (Hansen, 2015, Hansen & Jørgensen, 2020; Hansen, et al., 2023) can nurture what can be understood as health through the notion of ‘ontological homecoming’ based on Late Heidegger and eco-phenomenological perspectives. On the practice-methodological level he will describe how he works with the interplay between art experiences and philosophical dialogues (through the dialogue model ‘the Wonder Compass’, Hansen, 2022, 2023) when working with parents in grief and with cancer patients and their relatives and care takers.

Dyring will focus on the creative and existential dimensions of communication when working with people in care of dementia. (Dyring 2022a, Dyring 2022b), and 2) how to facilitate the sharing of a world that includes people who are many different places in their dementia (Dyring and Grøn 2021). Together these issues call for “world-open care” (Dyring 2022a, Dyring 2023) as a critical supplement to the reining paradigm of “person-centered care” (Kitwood 2019).

On the third day, the four lecturers will give each a methodological description of how they in practice work as researchers-in-the-field with phenomenology, philosophical practices or art-based research.

On the fourth and final day, the PhD-students will participate in the morning session in a Wonder Lab Session led by Hansen and Leget experiencing different forms of working with their research questions in wondrous aesthetical, philosophical, and contemplative ways. In the afternoon session, the PhD-students’ will in groups reflect upon self-chosen methodological or theoretical questions that have been awoken during the course and in relation to their own research project. 

The course will be organized along lectures, dialogues and interactivity through workshops.

The organizer of this course is Professor Finn Thorbjørn Hansen.

Morning and afternoon lectures in Day 1 & 2 will be thematically organized in order to address the

questions listed above. The lectures will be followed by questions and discussions in groups and in class.

On Day 3 the participants will be divided into groups of 5-6 participants. It is expected that everygroup member has read all abstracts and key questions in their group prior to the course. Before the course starts the participants will be asked to do two things: 1) write an abstract that describes their research project and their main research question (wonder), and 2) to list at least 5 questions that have come up while readings the mandatory literature of this course.

The language will be in English.

  • Literature: 

    Mandatory readings:

    Basting, Anne. 2020. Creative Care: A Revolutionary Approach to Dementia and Elder Care. 43-136. New York: HarperCollins Publishers.

    Bellass, Sue, et al. 2019. ‘Broadening the Debate on Creativity and Dementia: A Critical Approach’, Dementia 18(7–8): 2799–820.

    Dinkins, C. S. Hansen, F.T. (2016). Socratic Wonder as a Way to Aletheia in Qualitative Research and Action Research. In: HASER. Revista Internacional de Filosofía Aplicada, Nr. 7: 51-88.

    Dyring, Rasmus. 2022a. “Dementia Care Ethics, Social Ontology and World-Open Care: Phenomenological Motifs.” In Eriksen, C and N. Hämäläinen (eds.) Perspectives on Moral Change: Anthropologists and Philosophers Engage Transformations of Life Worlds. 106-125. New York: Berghahn Books.

    Dyring, Rasmus. 2022b. “On the Silent Anarchy of Intimacy: Images of Alterity, Openness and Sociality in Life with Dementia” In Mattingly, Cheryl and Lone Grøn (eds.) Imagistic Approaches to Aging and Care: Conversations between Anthropology, Philosophy and Art. 109-136. New York: Fordham University Press.

    Dyring, Rasmus. 2023. “Existential Care Ethics.” In Wardle, Huon, Nigel Rapport and Albert Piette (eds.) The Routledge Handbook of Existential Human Science. 173-182. London: Routledge.

    Dyring, Rasmus and Lone Grøn. 2022. “Ellen and the Little One: A Critical Phenomenology of Potentiality in Life with Dementia.” Anthropological Theory 22(1): 3-25.

    Esperandio, M. R. G., & Leget, C. (2022). Opening a hermeneutic space for spiritual care practices. HORIZONTE-Revista de Estudos de Teologia e Ciências da Religião20(62), e206204-e206204.

    Evans, H.H. (2016b). Medicine, the body and an invitation to wonder. Medical Humanities, June, Vol. 42, No. 2, pp: 97-102.

    Guldin, M., Leget, C. (2023). The Integrated Process Model of loss and grief. An interprofessional understanding. Death Studies, published online https://doi.org/10.1080/07481187.2023.2272960

    Hansen, F.T. (2015). The Call and Practice of Wonder. How to evoke a Socratic Community of Wonder in professional settings. In: M. N. Weiss (ed.), The Socratic Handbook, pp. 217-244. Vienna: LIT Verlag. 

    Hansen, F.T. (2022). What would an Apophatic Action Research look like? International Journal of Action Research, Eikeland (ed.), special issue on «Conceptualizing AR». Vol. 18, Issue 2/2022, pp: 100–115.

    Hansen, F.T. (2023). The Sense of Wonder as a necessary ‘Philosophical Literacy’ in Healthcare. In: Culture, Spirituality and Religious Literacy in Healthcare (Dellenborg, L. & Enstedt, D. Eds.), p. 217-231. London: Routledge.

    Hansen, F.T. (2023 in print). Wonder and Philosophy as Grounding Sources in Health Humanities. In: Paul Crawford and Paul Kadetz (Eds.), Palgrave Encyclopedia of Health Humanities. London: Palgrave.

    Hansen, F.T. (2023). Apophatic and Existential Wonder as a Humanizing Force. In: Hansen, F.T., Eide, S.B., & Leget, C. (2023). Wonder, Silence, and Human Flourishing: Towards a humanization of the professions of Health & Care, Welfare and Education, p. 21-46. Lanham: Lexington Books.

    Hansen, F.T. (2024 – in press). Existential Health and Spiritual Recovery: Two possible new and important concepts in Health Communication. The Nordic Journal of Arts, Culture and Health, Vol. xx: xx-xx.

    Hansen, F.T. & Jørgensen, L.B. (2020). A contribution to the ontology of the Fundamentals of Care Framework from a Wonder-based Approach. Journal of Clinical Nursing, Vol 29, No. 11-12 (Special Issue). Pp: 1797-1807. https://doi.org/10.1111/jocn.15272

    Hansen, F.T. & Jørgensen, L.B. (2021). Wonder-inspired Leadership: Or how to cultivate ethical and phenomenon-led health care. Nursing Ethics: Vol. 28, No. 6 (September): 951-966. https://doi-org.zorac.aub.aau.dk/10.1177/0969733021990791

    Haufe, M., Leget, C., Potma, M., & Teunissen, S. (2023). Better spiritual support for people living with early stage dementia: Developing the diamond conversation model. Dementia, 14713012231213907.

    Käll, Lisa F. 2017. ‘Intercorporeal Expression and the Subjectivity of Dementia’, in Luna Dolezal and Danielle Petherbridge (eds), Body/Self/Other: The Phenomenology of Social Encounters. Albany: State University of New York Press, pp. 359–86.

    Kitwood, Tom. 2019. Dementia Reconsidered, Revisited: The Person Still Comes First, 2nd ed, Edited by  Dawn Brooker. 6-23, 44-63, 104-122. London: Open University Press.

    Kontos, Pia. 2006. ‘Embodied Selfhood: An Ethnographic Exploration of Alzheimer’s Disease’, in Annette Leibing and Lawrence Cohen (eds), Thinking about Dementia: Culture, Loss, and the Anthropology of Senility. New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press, pp. 157–79. 

    Leget, C. (2017). Art of Living, Art of Dying: Spiritual Care for Good Death. London: Jessica Kingsley Publishers.

    Leget, C., van Nistelrooij, I., & Visse, M. (2019). Beyond demarcation: Care ethics as an interdisciplinary field of inquiry. Nursing ethics, 26(1), 17-25.

    Leget, C. & Boelsbjerg, H. B. (2023). The Art of Spiritual Care.: Implications for the use of instruments and tools. Tidsskrift for Forskning i Sygdom og Samfund20(38), 71-86.

    Leget, C. (2023). Inner Space, Resonance, and Wonder. In: Hansen, Eide Leget (eds), Wonder, Silence, and Human Flourishing: Toward a Rehumanization of Health, Education, and Welfare, 47-63.

    Richards, Ruth. 2010. ‘Everyday Creativity: Process and Way of Life – Four Key Issues’, in J.C. Kaufman and R.J. Sternberg (eds), The Cambridge Handbook of Creativity. New York: Cambridge University Press, pp. 189–215.

    Todres, L., & Galvin, K. (2010). “Dwelling-mobility”: An existential theory of well-being. International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, 5(3), pp. 1-6.

    Van der Meide, H., Olthuis, G., & Leget, C. (2015). Why frailty needs vulnerability: A care ethical perspective on hospital care for older patients. Nursing Ethics, 22(8), 860-869.

    Van Wijngaarden, E., Leget, C., & Goossensen, A. (2015). Ready to give up on life: The lived experience ofelderly people who feel life is completed and no longer worth living. Social Science & Medicine,138, 257-264.

    Van Wijngaarden, E., Leget, C., & Goossensen, A. (2016). Disconnectedness from the here-and-now: a phenomenological perspective as a counteract on the medicalisation of death wishes in elderly people. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy, 19(2), 265-273.

    Visse, M., Hansen, F.T. & Leget, C. (2019). The Unsayable in Arts-Based Research: on the Praxis of Life Itself. International Journal of Qualitative Methods, Vol. 18: 1-13 (DOI: 10.1177/1609406919851392)

    Visse, M., Hansen, F.T. & Leget, C. (2020). Apophatic Inquiry: Living the Questions Themselves. International Journal of Qualitative Methods, Vol. 19: 1-11.

    Zeiler, Kristin. 2014. ‘A Philosophical Defense of the Idea that We Can Hold Each Other in Personhood: Intercorporeal Personhood in Dementia Care’, Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 17: 131–41. 

    Additional readings:

    Bauman, Z. & Donskis, L. (2013). Moral Blindness: The Loss of Sensitivity in Liquid Modernity. Cambridge:Polity Press.

    Capobianco, R. (2011). Engaging Heidegger. Toronto: University of Toronto Press.

    Capobianco, R. (2015). Heidegger’s Way of Being. Toronto: University of Toronto Press.

    Cobb, M., Puchalski, C., & Rumbold, B. (Eds.). (2012). Oxford textbook of spirituality in healthcare. OUP Oxford.

    Cooper, D. (2012). Living with Mystery: Virtue, Truth, and Practice. European Journal of Philosophy of Religion,4(3): 1-13.

    Crawford, P., Brown, B. & Charise, A. (eds.)(2020). The Routledge Companion to Health Humanities. London: Routledge.

    Franke, W. (2014). A Philosophy of the Unsayable. Notre Dame, Indiana: University of Notre Dame Press.

    Gallagher, A. (2020). Slow Ethics and the Art of Care. Howard House, Bingley: Emerald Publishing.

    Galvin, K., & Todres, L. (2013). Caring and well-being: a lifeworld approach. London: Routledge.

    Han, B.-C. (2015). The Burnout Society. Stanford, CA: Stanford briefs.

    Han, B.-C. (2017). The Scent of Time. Cambridge: Polity Press.

    Han, B.-C.(2023). Vita Contemplativa. Polity Press.

    Hansen, F.T. (2016). At undre sig ved livets afslutning: Om brug af filosofiske samtaler i palliativt arbejde [To Wonder at the End the of Life: On the Use of Philosophical Conversations in Palliative Care]. Copenhagen: Academic Publisher.

    Hansen, F.T. (2019). Negativ fænomenologi [Negative Phenomenology]: . In: Michael Rasmussen & Mogens Pahuus (eds.), Mennesket og det andet: Bidrag til den eksistentielle fænomenologi, s. 151-178. Aalborg: Aalborg Universitetsforlag.

    Hansen, F.T. (2022). At skrive sig ud mod det gådefulde via undringens fire verdenshjørner. In: Herholdt-Lomholdt, S. (red.), Fenomenologi. å leve,samtale og skrive ut mot det gåtefulle i tilværelsen, s. 47-78 Bergen: Fagbokforlaget.

    Heidegger, M. (1995). The fundamental concepts of metaphysics: World, finitude, solitude. Bloomington: Indiana University Press.

    Køster, A. & Kofod, E.H. (2022). Cultural, Existential, and Phenomenological Dimensions of Grief Experience. Routledge.

    Mugerauer, R. (2008). Heidegger and homecoming: The leitmotif in the later writings. Toronto: University of Toronto Press. 

    Nygaard et al. (2022). Existential in Scandinavian Healthcare Journals: An Analysis of the Concept and Implications for Future Research. Religions, Vol. 13(979): 1-43. https://doi.org/10.3390/rel13100979

    Rosa, H. (2019). Resonance. A Sociology of Our Relationship to the World. Cambridge: Polity Press.

    Schinkel, A. (2018). Wonder and moral education. Educational Theory, 68(1), 31–48. https://doi.org/10.1111/edth.12287

    Svenaeus, F. (2000). The hermeneutics of medicine and the phenomenology of health: Steps towards a philosophy of medical practice. London: Kluwer Academic Publishers.

    Thorsted, A.C. & Hansen, F.T. & (2022). At tænke med hjertet: En grundbog i eksistentiel praksisfænomenologi. [To Think With the Heart: Basic Reflections on Existential Praxis Phenomenology]. Aarhus: Klim. (378 pages)

    Todres, L., Galvin, K. T., & Holloway, I. (2009). The humanization of healthcare: A value framework for qualitative research. International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, 4(2), 68-77.

    Tronto, J. C. (1993). Moral boundaries: A political argument for an ethic of care. Psychology Press.

    Ücok-Sayrak, Ö. (2019). Existential Rootedness: Aesthetic Ecology of Communication Ethics. Vancouver: Fairleigh Dickinson University Press.

    Uhrenfeldt, L., Sørensen, E. E., Bahnsen, I. B., & Pedersen, P. U. (2018). The centrality of the nurse–patientrelationship: A Scandinavian perspective. Journal of Clinical Nursing, 27, 3197–3204. https://doi. org/10.1111/jocn.14381 

    Verducci, D. & Kule, M. (eds.)(2022). The Development of Eco- Phenomenology as An Interpretative Paradigm of The Living World. Springer.

  • Lecturers: 

    Professor Finn Thorbjørn Hansen, Head of TEN, Aalborg University

    Professor Carlo Leget, Chair of Care Ethics, University of Humanities, Utrecht, The Netherlands

    Associate Professor Rasmus Dyring, Department of Philosophy, Aarhus University

    Senior Researcher Mai-Britt Guldin, Research Unit for GP and Department of Public Health, Aarhus University

    Professor Finn Thorbjørn Hansen is full professor of applied philosophy and head of the research group TEN (Time, Existence & Nature connectedness), Art, Aesthetics & Health, Department of Communication, University of Aalborg (Denmark). He has been a Visiting Professor at Agder University in Kristiansand (Norway) where he was head of an international research project ‘Wonder, Silence and Human Flourishing’(Hansen et al, 2023). His research focus and specialty is the phenomenology and ethics of wonder, existential and ethical phenomenology and ‘philosophical and phenomenological action research’. He has been heading several external funded research projects in the field of Health Care, Higher Education, Innovation and research on Artistic Creation. He is the founder of the Danish Society for Philosophical Practice and have written several books on wonder and philosophical counselling practices. For more information: https://vbn.aau.dk/en/persons/123561 

    Professor Carlo Leget is full professor of care ethics and research director at the University of Humanistic Studies in Utrecht, the Netherlands, and director of the Center for Loss and Existential Values in Aarhus. As chair of the care ethics department, he is responsible for the Master in Care Ethics & Policy at his university, and his research focuses on the intersection of care, meaning and end of life issues. Since 2015 he is a member of the Health Council of the Netherlands and the Care Ethics Research Consortium. For more information: https://www.uvh.nl/contact/vind-een-medewerker?person=nhrjrsEsHowOfbPwC

    Associate Professor Rasmus Dyring is associate professor of philosophy at Aarhus University. He works in the cross section between medical anthropology and the philosophy of healthcare doing mainly phenomenological research in conversation with ethnographic material. His main research interests are aging and dementia in a phenomenological perspective with a focus on potentiality and creativity. Dyring is the principal investigator of a VELUX HUMpraxis-project devoted to investigating, and developing practice that facilitates, everyday creativity in life with dementia.

    For more information: https://pure.au.dk/portal/en/persons/rasmus-dyring(ed0be392-1816-42d4-bd7d-d8885a31860c).html

    Senior Researcher Mai-Britt Guldin is a psychologist and senior researcher at Research Unit for General Practice and Department for Public Health, Aarhus University, Denmark and director of Center for Loss and Existential Values in Aarhus. Her research focus is on loss, grief, and end of life issues and for years she chaired her own research program and authored several books about loss and grief. Currently she is running the Center for Loss and Existential Values in Aarhus.

  • ECTS: 3

  • Time: October or November 2024

  • Place: Aalborg

  • Zip code: 9000

  • Number of seats: 20

  • Deadline: TBA

Enrolment requirements:

No paper will be required. However, we will need an abstract from every participant before the course starts to get an overview over the topics and be able to relate to their projects during the course. Participation will also require preparing and hold a presentation during the course.

Description:
This PhD course prepares students to explore video-based methods for the analysis and design of peoples’ interactions with robots or artificial intelligence (AI) in social settings.

Social and collaborative robots as well as AI systems are increasingly leaving factory shop floors and research laboratories and enter the everyday life and routines of various people in private, public, institutional, and organizational settings. Robots and AI are integrated in diverse contexts including family interactions, education, teamwork, public transport, and hospital settings. In difference to controlled laboratory environments, the technologies increasingly enter the complexity and “messiness” of real-world contexts. They meet a diversity of people engaging and interacting in various forms and for various purposes with the technology. Traditionally, laboratory research uses quantitative methods often focusing on dyadic task-based interaction, with one user and one robotic or AI system solving one specific task. However, to understand what happens when people engage with robots and AI in real-world settings, we need to open our perspective to the specific social context, the diversity of people that engage with the technologies and the various forms in which people engage/disengage, interact or collaborate with the technology as a single user, in groups or with other participation forms or roles. Therefore, we need to turn to qualitative methods that can deal with the complexity and dynamics of interaction with robots and AI in real world settings.  

The course introduces video-based methods for analyzing and designing robots or AI for real-world settings, combining video/ethnography and co-creation tools from participatory and interaction design. We will focus on methodological issues concerning 1) Describing practices using ethnomethodology, video ethnography and analysis, 2) Intervening in practices using enactments, bodystorming, and voice-overs, 3) Reflecting on how these practices inform our understanding of real-world practices and concrete guidelines and how this in turn can inform the design of robots and AI, thus facilitating interdisciplinary dialogue and collaboration.

Learning Objectives:

The students will gain knowledge and practical experience in:

a)      Planning and conducting video ethnographic studies, including data collection, ethics, transcription, and video analysis.

b)      Preparation and facilitation of collaborative data sessions and co-creation workshops, using techniques for rapid prototyping, including doing enactments, bodystorming and vocal sketching.

c)      Facilitating and navigating interdisciplinary collaborations by using techniques that can bridge both fields.

Teaching methods:

The course will be divided into two parts. The first part will be taught through lectures that introduce methods and workshops in which the students gain firsthand practical experience with these methods. In the second part of the course, the students will relate and apply the acquired knowledge to their own PhD-projects and present their results for discussion at the end of the course.

For practical and pedagogical reasons, the exercises in the first part of this course will particularly focus on video-based methods exploring the impact of robots on social practices in public settings and explore how a deeper understanding of these practices can inform design. Public spaces are easy to access for students during exercises in the workshops and the course lectures have the relevant data to supplement the workshops. In the second part of the course, we will encourage students to apply the methods to their own PhD projects, which may include robots and AI in any social settings.

Target group

This course is directed to an interdisciplinary audience looking for

a)      students of social science and humanities aiming to understand meaning-making processes in social settings in which robots or AI are or should be embedded,

b)      design students who are interested in exploring material and social aspects when designing robots or AI for interactions in real world settings, and

c)      students of robotics, HRI, HCI who are programming or building robots and AI and are interested in learning techniques for grounding their development in a deeper understanding of human practices and human-centred design processes.  

To summarize, the course is for every PhD student who is studying, designing or developing human-robot or human-AI interaction in any social setting. Both Danish and foreign students are welcome. The course will be taught in English.

Program outline:

Day 1: Describing

  • Overview of the course & welcome (0.5hr)
  • Introduction Lecture to the topic of observation for design (video observation, transcription, and video analysis (1,5 hrs)
  • Workshops on observation, transcription, and video analysis (5 hrs)
  • Q&A (0,5 hrs)

Day 2: Intervening

  • Introduction Lecture video-based and participatory methods for rapid prototyping with focus on co-creation methods like enactment and bodystorming (1,5)
  • Workshops testing different methods of enacting human robot interaction (5 hrs)
  • Open Q&A session (0,5)

Day 3:  Describing and intervening in own PhD projects

  • Broadening the perspective to other application scenarios & bridging analysis and design in a mini-project: Dive into particular themes of observing, analyzing enacting and informing/designing in regard to your own project (lecture and discussion 3 hrs)
  • Afternoon: group or individual work relating the knowledge to the students’ own projects (5hrs)

Day 4: Reflecting

  • Finalizing mini-project work and individual / group presentation preparation (4 hrs)
  • Students’ presentations (2 hrs)
Final Discussions and evaluation (1hrs)

Organizer:

The Doctoral Programme in Communication and Psychology
  

Lecturers:

Dr. Antonia L. Krummheuer, Associate Professor for Qualitative Methods and Technology Studies, Institute for Communication and Psychology, member of the HRI Lab at Aalborg University and the steering committee of Aalborg Robotic Challenge, is organizing and teaching on the course.

Dr. Hannah R. M. Pelikan, postdoc in the AI in Motion group, Department of Culture and Society, Linköping University, developed several techniques for bridging video ethnography and interaction design. She is part of the program committee for the HRI 2024 conference and co-editor of the special issue on Sound in HRI at the ACM Transactions on Human-Robot Interaction.

Key literature (I am very sorry; I noted the wrong application deadline for the PhD course. We are still working on the list. We will also remember to split it up in mandatory and secondary literature.):

Mandatory

Interaction analysis (methods)

  1. Heath, C., Hindmarsh, J., & Luff, P. (2010). Video in Qualitative Research: Analysing Social Interaction in Everyday Life. Sage.
  2. Hannah Pelikan. 2023. Transcribing human–robot interaction: Methodological implications of participating machines. In P. Haddington, T. Eilittä, A. Kamunen, L. Kohonen-Aho, T. Oittinen, I. Rautiainen, & A. Vatanen (Eds.), Ethnomethodological Conversation Analysis in Motion: Emerging Methods and New Technologies (1st ed.). Routledge. https://doi.org/10.4324/9781003424888

Interaction with Robots

  1. Alač, M., J. Movellan & F. Tanaka, 2011: When a Robot Is Social: Spatial Arrangements and Multimodal Semiotic Engagement in the Practice of Social Robotics. Social Studies of Science, 41(6): 893–926. https://doi.org/0.1177/0306312711420565.
  2. Dautenhahn K. Some Brief Thoughts on the Past and Future of Human-Robot Interaction. ACMTrans. Hum.-Robot Interact. 2018;7(1). Available from: https://doi.org/10.1145/3209769.
  3. Hornecker, E., Krummheuer, A. L., Bischof, A., & Rehm, M. (2022). Beyond dyadic HRI: building robots for society. interactions, 29(3), 48–53. https://dl.acm.org/doi/10.1145/3526119

Interaction Design

  1. Brandt, E., Binder, T., & Sanders, E. B.-N. (2012). Tools and techniques: Ways to engage telling, making and enacting. I J. Simonsen & Toni. Robertson (Red.), Routledge International Handbook of Participatory Design (s. 145–181). Routledge.
  2. Krummheuer, A. L. (2023). Practice-based robotics: How sociology can inform the development of social robots. I F. Muhle (red.), Soziale Robotik: Eine sozialwissenschaftliche Einführung (s. 117-136). De Gruyter. https://doi.org/10.1515/9783110714944-006
  3. Pelikan, H, & Jung, M.F. (2023). Designing Robot Sound-In-Interaction: The Case of Autonomous Public Transport Shuttle Buses. In Proceedings of the 2023 ACM/IEEE International Conference on Human-Robot Interaction (HRI '23). Association for Computing Machinery, New York, NY, USA, 172–182. https://doi.org/10.1145/3568162.3576979
  4. Randall, D., & Rouncefield, M. (2018). Ethnographic Approach to Design. In K. L. Norman & J. Kirakowski (Eds.), The Wiley Handbook of Human Computer Interaction (pp. 125--141). https://doi.org/10.1002/9781118976005.ch7
  5. Lucero, A., Dalsgaard, P., Halskov, K., & Buur, J. (2016). Designing with Cards. I P. Markopoulos, J.-B. Martens, J. Malins, K. Coninx, & A. Liapis (Red.), Collaboration in Creative Design: Methods and Tools (s. 75–95). Springer International Publishing. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-29155-0_5

Secondary

Related to the case of traffic:

  1. Haddington, Pentti and Rauniomaa, M. (2013). Interaction between road users: offering space in traffic. Space and Culture Vol 17 (2).
  2. Laurier, E., Muñoz, D., Miller, R., & Brown, B. (2020). A Bip, a Beeeep, and a Beep Beep: How Horns Are Sounded in Chennai Traffic. Research on Language and Social Interaction, 53(3), 341–356. https://doi.org/10.1080/08351813.2020.1785775
  3. Liberman, K. (2013). The Local Orderliness of Crossing Kincaid. I K. Liberman (Red.), More Studies in Ethnomethodology (s. 11–43). SUNY Press.

More general

  1. Crabtree, A., Rouncefield, M., & Tolmie, P. (2012). Doing Design Ethnography. Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4471-2726-0
  2. Matarić, M., 2018: On Relevance: Balancing Theory and Practice in HRI. ACM Transactions on Human-Robot Interaction, 7(1):8:1–8:2. https://doi.org/10.1145/3209770.
  3. Moore, R.J., M.H. Szymanski, R. Arar & G-J. Ren, (Eds.), 2018: Studies in Conversational UX Design. Wiesbaden: Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-95579-7.
  4. Šabanović, S., 2010: Robots in Society, Society in Robots. International Journal of Social Robotics, 2(4): 439–450. https://doi.org/10.1007/s12369-010-0066-7.
  5. Šabanović, S. & W.-L. Chang, 2016: Socializing Robots: Constructing Robotic Sociality in the Design and Use of the Assistive Robot PARO. AI & SOCIETY, 31(4): 537–551. https://doi. org/10.1007/s00146-015-0636-1.
  6. Suchman L. Human-Machine Reconfigurations: Plans and Situated Actions. Second edition. Cambridge University Press; 2007.
  7. Weiss A, Spiel K. Robots beyond Science Fiction: mutual learning in human–robot interaction on the way to participatory approaches. AI & Society. 2022; 37:1-15. Available from: https://doi.org/10.1007/s00146-021-01209-w.
  8. Ylirisku, S. & J. Buur, 2007: Designing with Video. Focusing the User-Centred Design Process. Wiesbaden: Springer.
ECTS: 3
Time: August 19-22
Place: Aalborg University, Rendsburggade 14, 9000 Aalborg. Room will follow
Number of seats: 12

________________________________________________________________________________

 Welcome to Expertise and emerging technologies: A working and organizing perspective.

Course description, incl. learning objectives and prerequisites:

The accelerated technological developments, particularly in the areas that directly touch on skilled and knowledge work, has rejuvenated social, economic, ethical, and humanistic questions regarding “expertise”. Here, there it is essential for researchers and academics to engage in in-depth, qualitative understanding of expertise and how it is developed, enacted and worked, critically examine the intended and unintended consequences of technologies for how expertise, and creatively contribute to the assumptions, debates, decisions, and actions through their scholarly work. This PhD course aims to engage our future scholars in such a process, providing them with the knowledge, methods, and skills to investigate and contribute to engaged scholarship in this area.

The course focuses on the following themes and questions

-        Deep dive into expertise: past, present and future

-        Technologies of expertise: a historical and phenomenological analysis

-        Interactions of technologies and expertise: (emerging) configurations of technology and experts at work

-        Developing expertise in relation to emerging technologies (novel expertise, destruction of expertise, and new modes of learning and knowing)

-        Organizing expertise through emerging technologies: within and across organizations (coordination, market of expertise, control, and                          jurisdiction)

 

Learning objectives

-        Understanding how expertise is developed, exercises, and organized through classic academic theories;

-        Developing a critical, informed understanding of the broader scheme of technological developments (including but not limited to artificial                 intelligence, robotics, …) about the development, exercising, and organizing expertise

-        Gaining experience on how to investigate the impacts of technologies on development, enactment and organization of expertise as a form of           in-depth, engaged scholarship

-        Being able to analyze and synthesize their research findings in relation to theoretical debates and develop insights for understanding and                  practice.

Prerequisites

-        No formal prerequisite, but preferably a basic familiarity with qualitative research methods

Preliminary program (May 27-31)

First day (from noon):

Theoretical background:

-        12-13: Welcome and introduction to course

-        13.10-15 Lecture (including break): Organizational and sociological foundations of the study of expertise and technology (Mohammad and Kasper together)

Studying and analyzing expertise:

-        15.30-17: Plenary session where student introduce own projects

Second day 

Morning session (theoretical focus)

-        9-10.30: The micro-dynamics of expertise - materiality, sociality (Mohammad)

-        10.30-12: The macro-dynamics of expertise (Kasper)

Afternoon session (analysis focus)

-        12-13: Lunch

-        13-15: Introducing live case - AI in radiology (virtual) 

-        15.30-18: Working with live case in groups

Third day: 

Morning session

-        9-10.30: Organizational perspectives on expertise and technological change - authority, roles, and coordination (Kasper)

-        10.30-12: Organizing expertise through emerging technologies (Mohammad)

Afternoon session

-        13-17: Student presentations and feedback on analytical perspectives on expertise (one hour for each project)

Fourth day:

Morning session:

-        A focus on forms of expertise

-        9-12: Interactional, contributory and processual dimensions of expertise (Davide Nicolini)

-        9-10: Relational expertise (Davide Nicolini)

-        11-12: Trans-situated expertise (Davide Nicolini)

Afternoon session:

-        13-17: Student presentations and feedback on analytical perspectives on expertise (one hour for each project) (Kasper, Mohammad, Davide)

Fifth day (end noon):

-        Morning session:

-        9-10.30: The implications of emerging technologies on expertise (Mohammad)

-        10.45-12: Wrapping up the course

Final Symposium on Expertise and Emerging Technologies (September 6) (online)

-        9-10: Virtual keynote

-        9-12: Student presentations and feedback on mini-ethnographic project

-        13-16: Student presentations and feedback on mini-ethnographic project

Teaching methods:

The course consists of

  • Dialectic lectures: Where we engage in critical reflection on the readings, and collective discussions, we use multiple forms of plenary discussions, peer-discussions, and interactive exercises.
  • Mini-ethnographic investigation: to gain a first-hand experience of the reality of expertise and practically learn how to investigate it, students will perform a mini-ethnographic examination of a domain of expertise (per their choice) in the period between the first and the second part of the course (see the schedule below) and produce a research essay, which will be presented at a final symposium.

Description of paper requirements, if applicable:

  • A critical essay, maximum 10,000 words on a specific area of expertise (students’ choice)
  • Format: a standard academic paper
  • To be presented in the symposium (online)

Key literature:

Mandatory literature: An approx, 300 pages compendium will be created based on extracts from books below:

●       Abbott, Andrew. 2014. The System of Professions: An Essay on the Division of Expert Labor. University of Chicago Press.

●       Barley, S. R. (2020). Work and technological change. Oxford University Press, USA.

●       Barley, S. R. (1996). Technicians in the workplace: Ethnographic evidence for bringing work into organizational studies. Administrative science               quarterly, 404-441.Collins, H., & Evans, R. (2019). Rethinking expertise. University of Chicago Press.

●       Eyal, G., & Medvetz, T. (2023). The Oxford Handbook of Expertise and Democratic Politics. Oxford University Press.Eyal, G. (2019). The crisis of                 expertise. John Wiley & Sons.

         ○       Pasquale, F. A. (2023). Battle of the Experts: The Strange Career of Meta-Expertise. In The Oxford Handbook of Expertise, edited by Gil                           Eyal and  Thomas Medvetz.

          ○       Huising, R. (2023). Professional Authority in The Oxford Handbook of Expertise, edited by Gil Eyal and Thomas Medvetz.

●       Heimstädt, M., Koljonen, T., & Elmholdt, K. T. (2023). Expertise in management research: A review and agenda for future research. The                          Academy  of Management Annals.

●       Pakarinen, P., & Huising, R. (2023). Relational Expertise: What Machines Can't Know. Journal of Management Studies.

●       Treem, J. W., & Leonardi, P. M. (Eds.). (2016). Expertise, communication, and organizing. Oxford University Press


Suggested literature:

●       Susskind, Richard, and Daniel Susskind. 2015. The Future of the Professions: How Technology Will Transform the Work of Human Experts. Oxford            University Press, USA.

●       Pryma, J. (2022). Technologies of expertise: opioids and pain management’s credibility crisis. American Sociological Review87(1), 17-49.

●       Sandberg, J., Rouleau, L., Langley, A., & Tsoukas, H. (Eds.). (2017). Skillful performance: Enacting capabilities, knowledge, competence, and                      expertise in organizations (Vol. 7). Oxford University Press.


Organizer: 
Kasper Trolle Elmholdt, Associate Professor

Lecturers:  Kasper Trolle Elmholdt, Associate Professor, Department of Politics and Society, Aalborg University (elm@dps.aau.dk)

                   Dr. Mohammad H. Rezazade Mehrizi, Associate Professor, School of Business and Economics, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam                                           (m.rezazademehrizi@vu.nl)

ECTS: 5

Time: 27-31 May 2024

Place: TBA

Zip code:  
2450

City: Aalborg University Copenhagen

Number of seats: 25

Deadline: 6 May 2024

    Welcome to Sociology of time

    Course description, incl. learning objectives and prerequisite:

    The aim of the course it to familiarize students with classical and contemporary perspectives in the sociology of time, to enable students to critically discuss theoretical assumptions, methodological approaches and empirical results within studies of time and temporality and to construct a theoretical framework and methodological approach to a specific research problem in the student’s own ongoing or planned project.

    Prerequisites

    This PhD course addresses both PhD students unfamiliar with theories of time and PhD students who are more experienced with the field. The first group will obtain knowledge about the key concepts, theoretical traditions and methodological discussions in the field. The second group will obtain new perspectives on their own work through the attentiveness to theoretical development, methodological concerns and discussions of how to apply theories and concepts in specific analyses.

    When signing up for the course, participants should submit ½ page about their own research and the role of time in it. These short papers will be used to select participants, if more than 15 sign up.

    Learning outcomes

    After completion of the course the doctoral student shall be able to:

    1. Knowledge and understanding

    • Present and discuss a broad overview of the different approaches in the sociology of time in general and of theoretical assumptions within the chosen areas of specialization in particular
    • State and analyze the main empirical results within the chosen area of specialization
    • Present and discuss current areas of conflict within the chosen area of specialization

    2. Skills and abilities

    • Orally and in writing present, explain and problematize research within the sociology of time in a format that meets international standards.
    • In a more elaborate paper synthesize the theories and research within the chosen area of specialization and construct a theoretical framework and methodological approach to a specific research problem in the student’s own ongoing or planned project.

    3. Judgment and approach

    • Critically discuss theoretical assumptions and empirical results within the sociology of time in general and the chosen area of specialization in particular.
    • Critically discuss methods used within the chosen area of specialization.
    • Critically discuss trends and future development of the chosen area of specialization.

    Lecturers:

    Anne-Kirstine Mølholt, Aalborg University
    Merete Monrad, Aalborg University

    ECTS:
    2

    Time:
    5-7 June 2024 (10am to 1pm)

    Place:
    AAU Copenhagen, Frederikskaj 10B, 1st floor, studio 3

    Number of seats:
    15. We will contact you after registration deadline for letting you know whether your admission has been accepted or you are on the waiting list. PhD fellows enrolled at AAU have first priority.

    Participation fee:
    The course is free of charge

    Deadline:
    Participation deadline: 1st of May 2024
    Paper deadline: 25th of May 2024

    Paper requirements
    Learning outcomes will be examined through an individually written working paper. The paper will be presented and discussed in a paper seminar. The paper must be submitted app. 10 days in advance of the course. For their paper, students are required to engage with and refer to some mandatory parts of the literature and to a relevant amount of extra literature of their own choice pertinent to their paper topics. Students choose their own topic, preferably in line with their topic of doctoral research. Papers must elaborate on the role of time in the student’s ongoing research. The paper must be no more than 4.000 words excluding abstract and references. 

    Important information concerning PhD courses: We have over some time experienced problems with no-show for our courses. Therefore, the Doctoral School has decided to introduce a no-show fee of DKK 2,000 DKK for each course where the student does not show up. Cancellations are accepted no later than 2 weeks before start of the course. Registered illness is of course an acceptable reason for not showing up.

    For inquiries regarding registration, cancellation or waiting list, please contact the PhD administration, aauphd@adm.aau.dk



Course organizer (name, department and research group):

MASSHINE 

Title and date of the course: 

“Social data science – machine learning in the humanities and social sciences”. 

26 – 30 August 2024

Location:

 Hotel Højgaarden, Slettestrandvej 50, 9690 Fjerritslev

Lecturer(s):

 Associate Professor Roman Jurowetzki (Aalborg University Business School)

Associate Professor Rolf Lyneborg Lund (Department of Sociology and Social Work, Aalborg University)

Associate Professor Anders Kristian Munk (Department of Culture and Learning, Aalborg University)

Professor Birger Larsen (Department of Communication and Psychology)

Assistant Professor Mathieu Jacomy (Department of Culture and Learning, Aalborg University)

 

Course description, incl. learning objectives and prerequisites:

The developments in computer science technologies and the increasing amount of accessible data present a range of new methodological opportunities for the social sciences and humanities.

Data from websites, social media and electronic devices (often referred to as ‘Big Data’) allow for new approaches and perspectives on issues relevant for both the social sciences and humanities. Meanwhile, the increasing computational power and development of artificial intelligence algorithms provide the means for accessing, combining and analyzing a variety of data types (numerical, textual, relational) in new and meaningful ways.

 This course is a hands-on practical introduction with no prerequisites in applying computer science techniques (like programming and machine learning) in humanities and social science research. It will cover a broad range of techniques and methods representing the latest methodological innovations in social science and humanities applications of machine learning and artificial intelligence.

Some techniques include:

 

·        Collecting data from the web using web scraping methods and API's

·        Processing textual data for quantitative analysis (Natural Language Processing)

·        Working and visualizing networks (network analysis)

·        Dimensionality reduction and clustering techniques (topic models and k-means clustering)

·        Visualization techniques for text data and networks

·        Building and understanding machine learning classifiers


This course is meant as a hands-on tools course focusing on the practical use of these methods and will not go in depth with the mathematical and theoretical foundations. It will rather provide a broad overview of the data science ecosystem and toolbox and enable immediate application.

 This course is supported by Danish Data Science Academy (DDSA) 

Teaching methods:

Each day will consist of a mixture of lectures and exercises using interactive online notebooks allowing participants to try out and use the various methods as they are being taught.

Participants are expected to work on a portfolio during the week with each day having hours dedicated to portfolio work with the possibility of sparring with the course lecturers. Here, participants will work on applying the methods and techniques presented on various cases.

Description of paper requirements, if applicable:

The course teaches the methods in python using the Jupyter Notebook IDE on Google Colab.

It is not a prerequisite to know Python beforehand as access to relevant courses will be provided and the first day of the course provides the relevant introduction.

Participants are expected to complete assigned introductory e-courses (e.g. on DataCamp or other selected platforms) before the course. Access to DataCamp will be provided 4 weeks in advance. Two mandatory online check-in sessions are scheduled to properly prepare participants for the course.

Key literature:

Mandatory literature: VanderPlas, Jake. Python data science handbook: Essential tools for working with data. " O'Reilly Media, Inc.", 2016. https://jakevdp.github.io/PythonDataScienceHandbook/

Suggested literature:

Mitchell, R. (2018). Web scraping with Python: Collecting more data from the modern web. " O'Reilly Media, Inc.".

Alammar, J., & Grootendorst, M. P. (2024). Hands-On Large Language Models. O'Reilly Media, Inc. (forthcoming)

Number of ECTS:

5

Velkommen til "Skriv PHD afhandlingens 'kappe': Struktur, sammenhæng, kvalitetskriterier og bidrag"

Beskrivelse
:

I akademisk skrivning hænger form og indhold sammen. Derfor er elementer som struktur, sammenhæng og rød tråd vigtige for kvaliteten af den tekst, som formidler forskningsaktiviteterne og de resultater, som den PhD-studerende producerer. Det, vi kan kalde ’det akademiske håndværk’ handler ikke kun om systematisk refleksion angående fokus, forskningsspørgsmål, analyseenhed, teori og begreber, videnskabsteori, design, metode og etik, samt analyseproces. Kvaliteten af håndværket handler i høj grad også om skriftligt at argumentere for de valg, som man tager eller har taget desangående og at opbygge en tekst, hvor disse valg og deres konsekvenser er tydelige i indhold og struktur. Dette arbejde starter tidligt i processen og pågår kontinuerligt i løbet af en ph.d. proces. Kurset er derfor designet til at deltagere kan få glæde af oplæg, øvelser og pensum uanset hvor de er i ph.d. forløbet.

OBS: Kursuslitteraturen og undervisningen trækker på humanistisk/socialvidenskabelig forskning, men kurset er åbent for deltagere fra alle forskningstraditioner.

Formålet med ph.d.-kurset er at sætte fokus på det akademiske håndværk, der skal til for at skrive og redigere en afhandlings elementer, så de ved afhandlingens færdiggørelse fremstår som en struktureret, sammenhængende tekst af høj kvalitet, og hvor resultaternes gyldighedsbetingelser og bidrag er tydeligt præsenteret. På kursets tre dage arbejder vi med dette gennem forelæsninger, konkrete øvelser, og fælles diskussioner med henblik på at opbygge og udvide deltagernes ’værkstøjkasse’ og erfaring med at tage de nødvendige beslutninger, som færdiggørelse af en afhandling kræver.

Kurset bygger på nyeste forskning i akademisk skrivning, særligt angående klarhed, struktur, form-indhold relationen, kvalitetskriterier som reliabilitet, kohærens, transparens og analytisk generaliserbarhed. Samtidig er det et praktisk kursus, hvor deltagerne arbejder konkret med deres egen tekst i forhold til kursets emner.

Efter optagelse: Kursusdeltagerne skal indsende et refleksions-paper på max 10 sider. Præsentation af phd-projektet og det/de foreløbige forskningsspørgsmål må fylde max 1 side, da det centrale i paperet skal være en refleksion over skrivemæssige udfordringer og ambitioner er i relation til deres afhandlings struktur, kvalitet og bidrag.

Teaching methods:

Kursets 3 dage har hvert et tema. Hver dag vil bestå af underviseres oplæg på baggrund af kursuslitteraturen, guidede skriveøvelser, parvise refleksioner og feedback, samt dialoger i plenum.

Deltagerne vil få feedback på deres egne skriveambitioner og -udfordringer af underviserne og de andre kursusdeltagere. Vi vil desuden undersøge og diskutere, hvordan håndværket i at give en tekst form hænger sammen med tekstens indhold og dermed det konkrete fænomen/proces/felt, som deltagerne har undersøgt.

  • Undervisere:
    Ninna Meier og Caitlin McMullin, Aalborg Universitet

  • ECTS:
    3

  • Time:
    30-31/1-1/2 2024

  • Kursussted: 
    Aalborg Universitet, Aalborg. 9220 Aalborg Øst. Seminarrum bliver udmeldt senere.

  • Antal deltagere:
    16. Efter tilmeldingsfristen vil vi lade dig vide, om du tilbydes en plads på kurset eller venteliste. Ph.d. studerende indskrevet på Aalborg Universitet har første prioritet.
    Kurset er fyldt op, men det er muligt at komme på venteliste, skriv til  Marianne Høgsbro: inst.issa.phd@socsci.aau.dk

  • Deltagergebyr:
    Der er ingen deltagergebyr for deltagelse

  • Deadlines: 
    For tilmelding: 3. januar 2024. Paper deadline: 15. januar 2024. Der skal indleveres et paper på max 10 sider.

    Hvis du har spørgsmål er du velkommen til at kontakte Marianne Høgsbro: inst.issa.phd@socsci.aau.dk

    Vigtig information vedrørende Ph.d. kurser: Ph.d skolen har desværre i længere tid oplevet, at der er flere deltagere som ikke dukker op til vores kurser efter tilmelding. Vi har derfor besluttet at indføre et no-show gebyr på vores kurser på 2,000 kr. hvis en tilmeldt deltager ikke dukker op. Det er muligt at aflyse deltagelse senest 2 uger inden kursusstart. Dokumenteret sygdom er selvfølgelig accepteret som gyldig grund til aflysning af deltagelse.
Welcome to Writing the PhD dissertation: Structure, Quality, and Contribution

Course description, incl. learning objectives and prerequisite:

Form and content are linked in academic writing. Thus, structure, coherence, and flow are important elements that support the quality of a PhD dissertation. PhD students must learn to make decisions about their research and writing while they are doing this research and while they are writing their PhD dissertation. Thus, the ’academic craft’ involves systematic reflection and choices about focus, research question, unit of analysis, theory and concepts, philosophy of science approach, design, methods, ethics, and analysis. However, the academic craft is also demonstrated through how those choices are presented and argued for in writing and through one’s capacity to develop a text in which these choices and their consequences are clearly presented and reflected uponThis work starts in the beginning of the PhD process and lasts until the defense. The course is therefor designed to be useful to PhD students at any stage of the process. While the course is open to PhD students from all disciplines, it is important to note that the course organizers will draw on research and examples from their own work and research fields. Moreover, participation requires active engagement with and reflection upon the course literature and one’s own work.

The Purpose of the PhD course is to focus on the academic craft that is needed to write and edit the constitutive parts of a dissertation so that these parts join to a structured and coherent academic text of high quality where the boundary conditions and contributions of the dissertation are clearly presented and discussed. During the course lectures, group and solo exercises, and shared discussions we will expand participants’ ’toolbox’ and experiences with making the necessary decisions about and in their writing.

The course material draws on social science and humanities research into academic writing, especially regarding clarity, concepts/constructs, form-content relationships, the role of theory, context, quality criteria (e.g., reliability, coherence, transparency, and analytical generalizability). It is also a very practical course with a strong focus on participants’ own PhD project and writing, with exercises and time for discussions and advancing participants’ own text. The course is open to PhD students from all disciplines, but it is important to note that the course literature and the lecturers draw on examples from social science and humanities, primarily qualitative research.

Lecturers:

Ninna Meier and Caitlin McMullen, Aalborg University

ECTS:


Time:
9-10-11 April 2024

Place:
Lokalet Studio 2, Frederikskaj 10B, 1. sal., 2450 København SV, Aalborg University, Campus Copenhagen. 

Number of seats:
16. 
We will contact you after registration deadline for letting you know whether your admission has been accepted in the course or you are on the waiting list. PhD students enrolled at AAU have first priority.

Participation fee:
The course is free of charge

Paper:
Course participants are expected to submit a 10-page (max) paper/essay in which they present their own work in relation to one or more of the key concepts of the course (structure, coherence, quality, contribution) and reflect upon their own ambitions for and challenges with regards to writing

Deadline:
Participation deadline: 10th March 2024
Paper deadline: 25th March 2024

Important information concerning PhD courses: We have over some time experienced problems with no-show for our courses. Therefore, the Doctoral School has decided to introduce a no-show fee of DKK 2,000 DKK for each course where the student does not show up. Cancellations are accepted no later than 2 weeks before start of the course. Registered illness is of course an acceptable reason for not showing up.

For inquiries regarding registration, cancellation or waiting list, please contact the PhD administration, aauphd@adm.aau.dk

The course is full and it is now longer possible to sign up.  It is no longer possible to be added to the waiting list.
Description:
Drawing on examples from the global north and global south, this course adopts a policy perspective to addressing the challenges of achieving a just green transition and pursuing a more sustainable society. Following the policy cycle (problem identification, agenda setting, policy formulation, decision-making, policy implementation, and policy evaluation), the course aims to provide a broader understanding of the key dimensions concerning the green transition. The course views the green transition as a broader phenomenon going beyond mere technological solutions: it is a social, cultural, political, and administrative-organizational project. Therefore, it is essential to inquire into the public deliberation and debates about desired futures, political decision making as well as political contestation as highlighted by NIMBYism (not-in-my-backyard-ism) which has surged due to the need for rapid climate action and fundamental change of energy systems. To enact and implement any policies related to green transition then the political system needs legitimacy, in the form of support for the public and societal stakeholders. This is especially the case in democracies, also true in less democratic or outright undemocratic societies. It thus requires the public to be convinced that environmental issues and climate change are real and man-made, otherwise it will never be identified as a political problem. Furthermore, it requires that the issue it on the public’s agenda for a sustained period. If this is not the case, then political system it unlikely to pursue the costly policies related to climate change. The green transition also requires that there are supportive governance structures in place for realizing the abstract goals of combatting climate change as well as practical policies related to this. Local governments, for example, are generally viewed as important actors in the realisation of high-level policy objectives in the green transition and the global visions for the creation of a climate neutral society by reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Congruently, EU’s policies under the Green Deal envisions key roles for national and local governments in the green transition by, for example, planning for and developing green infrastructures in built-up environments, promoting green transport (electrical vehicles), or by reducing energy consumption. Therefore, it is also important to consider how local governments may play a part in the green transition by either playing an active and innovative role or by playing a more reactive instrumental role. Unions, too, are important actors. In the growing renewables industry, they acquire new and more ambiguous roles. While they remain to be employers’ antagonists regarding traditional employment relations, decarbonization is essentially a mission they share with employers in the interest of humanity.

This course will focus on:

  • Problem identification: e.g. popular attitudes and perception of environmental and climate issues, environment citizenship, the role of stakeholders and interest groups (unions, the renewables industry, green think tanks etc.)
  • Policy formation: e.g. green growth/degrowth, climate taxes, active labour market policies enabling workers’ transition from closing black industries to the growing renewables sector.  
  • Agenda setting: e.g. the environmental and climate agenda
  • Policy formulation: e.g. policy visions, the role of local governments and the Green Deal, conceptualising the green transition and energy futures
  • Decision-making: e.g. green infrastructure and public deliberation
  • Policy implementation and evaluation: e.g. Supportive governance structures and capacity, environmental Justice and contestation 

Learning Objectives (knowledge and abilities)

  • Gain an overview of the state-of-the-art knowledge on policies and governance structures supporting green transition
  • Ability to formulate arguments and hypothesis about the green transition
  • Understand the implications, challenges and opportunities related to the Green Transition
  • Possess knowledge of key theoretical and conceptual approaches related to the subject area in the context of social science and history
  • Be able to critically assess relevant theories and make informed choices regarding theory selection in relation to empirical analyses
  • Have the ability to apply relevant theories and tools of the field to concrete empirical cases and issues

  • Lecturers:
    Malayna Raftopoulos; Mads Peter Klindt; Christian Lindholst; Kristian Kongshøj; Troels Fage Hedegaard, Theresa Scavenius; Anita Nissen;  Aalborg University

  • ECTS:
    4

  • Time:
    April 29th to May 2nd

  • Place:
    Aalborg University

  • Zip code: 
    9220

  • City:
    Aalborg

  • Number of seats:
    15. We will contact you after registration deadline for letting you know whether your admission has been accepted in the course or you are on the waiting list. PhD fellows enrolled at AAU have first priority.

  • Deadlines:
    Registration deadline: 14th March 2024
    Post paper deadline: 17th May 2024

  • Participation fee:

    The course is free of charge

  • Important information concerning PhD courses: 
    We have over some time experienced problems with no-show for our courses. Therefore, the Doctoral School has decided to introduce a no-show fee of DKK 2,000 DKK for each course where the student does not show up. Cancellations are accepted no later than 2 weeks before start of the course. Registered illness is of course an acceptable reason for not showing up.

    If you have questions you are welcome to contact PhD programme secretary Marianne Høgsbro inst.dps.phd@dps.aau.dk

Description:

This PhD course targets PhD students studying migration patterns and/or integration processes in the field of social and political sciences. The overall aim of the course is to heighten Ph.d. students theoretical and analytical insights within migration and integration research. Moreover, it aims at hightens students analytical skills in how to apply theories, concepts and approaches in their own data materieal (qualitative as well as quantitative). The morning slot lectures present and exemplify theories and concepts (and contestations between them), based on examples from classical as well as contemporary migration and integration research. In the afternoon slots PhD students’ make presentations of their own work, followed by feedback and common discussion.

Teaching format:

The course has a workshop format combined with lectures. This means that participating PhDs will be required to present and discuss each other’s work. A reading list will be distributed in advance of the workshop, and all are expected to read and be prepared to discuss the readings in relation to concrete examples from their own and others’ work presented during the workshop. It is required that each participant send a paper (5-10 pages ) one week before the course outlining their PhD project (including a short introduction of research question, theoretical/conceptual framework, research methods, and a focus on analytical ideas, examples, reflections).

Organizer and Lectures:

Associate professor, Karen Nielsen Breidahl, Department of Political and Society, Aalborg University
Associate professor Kathrine Vitus, Department of Sociology and Social Work, Aalborg University

ECTS:
3

Time:
7-9 August 2024

Place: 
Aalborg University, Campus Copenhagen

City:
Copenhagen

Number of seats:
14. We will contact you after registration deadline for letting you know whether your admission has been accepted in the course or you are on the waiting list. PhD fellows enrolled at Aalborg University have first priority.

Deadlines:
Participation deadline: 1 May 2024
Paper deadline: 29 July 2024

Paper:
Each participant will need to submit a paper (5-10 pages) about his or her project based before the courses

Participation fee:
The course is free of charge

Important information concerning PhD courses: We have over some time experienced problems with no-show for our courses. Therefore, the Doctoral School has decided to introduce a no-show fee of DKK 2,000 DKK for each course where the student does not show up. Cancellations are accepted no later than 2 weeks before start of the course. Registered illness is of course an acceptable reason for not showing up.

If you have questions you are welcome to contact PhD programme secretary Marianne Høgsbro inst.dps.phd@dps.aau.dk

Welcome to Unveiling Complexity: Statistical Approaches to Interactive Hypothesis Testing in the Social Sciences

 Course description

"Unveiling Complexity: Statistical Approaches to Interactive Hypothesis Testing in the Social Sciences" is an applied course designed for PhD students in quantitative social sciences who wish to deepen their understanding and skills in testing conditional hypotheses (e.g., also called statistical moderation). Interactive hypotheses are abundant in social science research, as we often want to understand the conditions under which certain relationship exist.

In this course, students are introduced to state-of-the-art best practice in the statistical testing of interactive hypotheses. The applied statistical teaching is done with R and students are recommended to have basic knowledge of R programming. Students are encouraged to bring their own research questions to the course and engage with potential interactive hypotheses in their field during the practical parts of the course.

Through a combination of lectures, practical exercises, and case studies, you will learn how to develop and validate interactive hypotheses in quantitative social science research using R. You will explore various statistical tools such as kernel or bin plots to assess the validity of linear interactive models. We will also touch upon more advanced machine-learning-based models, such as the Kernel Regularized Least Squares estimator, to uncover the true interactive patterns in your data.

By the end of the course, you will have a comprehensive toolkit of advanced statistical approaches to tackle complex research questions in the social sciences. You will also gain the ability to critically evaluate existing literature and design rigorous empirical studies that effectively capture and analyze interactive phenomena.

Lecturers:
Dominik Schraff, Associate Professor, Department of Politics and Society, Aalborg University

ECTS:
2

Time:
25-26 March 2024

Place:
Aalborg University, Campus Aalborg

Number of seats:
15. 
We will contact you after registration deadline for letting you know whether your admission has been accepted in the course or you are on the waiting list.

Paper requirements

The final paper is a post-reflection paper that should be send to the teacher 2 weeks after the course. The paper should present the whole workflow of (1) specifying an interactive (social science) hypothesis, (2) acquiring and preparing the data to test it, (3) specifying the statistical model to test the hypotheses, and (4) assess the statistical validity of the findings on the interactive relationship.

The emphasis should lie on the last point (4), so students are encouraged to use readily available data, e.g. replicating existing studies proposing interactive relationships.

Participation fee:
The course is free of charge

Deadlines:
Participation deadline: 1st February 2024
Post paper deadline: 3rd April 2024

Important information concerning PhD courses: We have over some time experienced problems with no-show for our courses. Therefore, the Doctoral School has decided to introduce a no-show fee of DKK 2,000 DKK for each course where the student does not show up. Cancellations are accepted no later than 2 weeks before start of the course. Registered illness is of course an acceptable reason for not showing up.

If you have questions you are welcome to contact PhD programme secretary Marianne Høgsbro inst.dps.phd@dps.aau.dk