Description:
The development in mixed cities shows an ever-increasing focus on that mix different functions; businesses, different ownerships to homes, restaurants, cafes, shops etc. into the same urban area, all the way down to a mix of multiple features in the same building. 

The mixed city is both the realization of world goals (UN´s SDG) and local implementation of the city of the future. That is about developing cities in a sustainable way, socially and functionally, which ensures that creation vibrant and safe cities with a CO2-reducing lifestyle and shape. A mix of several functions in the same building presupposes a mixed ownership, which in turn presupposes property boundaries in three dimensions (3D property).

The course enables the participants to use cases from the real world to examine institutions and public and private engagement in 3D real property.

As a part of the course, the participants will be introduced to theories of property rights, theories of land administration and the social domain cadastral data models. Cases from Sweden, the Netherlands, Australia and Demark are presented which illustrate that cadastral management are closely linked to different institutional and regulatory models and actors in the different countries.

Organizer: Esben Munk Sørensen

Lecturers: Professor Jesper M Paasch, AAU, Associate Professor Esben Munk Sørensen, AAU,  Associate Professor Jenny Poulson, KTH/Stockholm, Professor P.J.M. van Oosterom, TU/Delft. Professor emeritus Stig Enemark, Denmark

ECTS: 3.0

Time:  October - December 2022 (about one lecture every 2 weeks).

Place: Online

Number of seats: 15

Deadline: 9th September 2022

Important information concerning PhD courses:
We have over some time experienced problems with no-show for both project and general courses. It has now reached a point where we are forced to take action. Therefore, the Doctoral School has decided to introduce a no-show fee of DKK 3.000 for each course where the student does not show up. Cancellations are accepted no later than 2 weeks before start of the course. Registered illness is of course an acceptable reason for not showing up on those days. Furthermore, all courses open for registration approximately four months before start. This can hopefully also provide new students a chance to register for courses during the year.
We look forward to your registrations.


Course description 

The planning of urbanization at all scales, related to infrastructures, everyday life, and the reciprocities between urban settlements and their rural hinterlands, stands as an increasingly important research agenda, not least because of increased urbanization and the climate crisis. It is expected that by 2030 there will be around 5 billion people living in urban settlements. Such settlements are hubs for living, interaction, innovation, creativity, trade, research, production, and consumption and provide the best opportunity for transition towards sustainable development, not least because of the opportunity to create common sustainable systems and infrastructures.

This course will provide PhD students with an interdisciplinary approach to urbanization processes and planning complexities in ‘Planning for Urban Sustainability’. We therefore encourage students with a variety of themes and focuses to join, e.g. environmental sustainability, climate change, social justice, gentrification, territorial stigmatization, infrastructures and mobilities, etc. We also consider processes of urbanization to be wide-spanning social phenomena that entail a rather significant influence on our perceptions of ‘the rural’, landscapes, and remote communities. Finally, we also invite students who may not, as such, have phrased their work explicitly in terms of urbanization, but rather in terms of the processes of planning in uncertain environments and complex settings – such entry-points are equally essential for debating sustainability.

In other words, we intend to discuss how sustainability agendas may arise and (re-)combine across such varied insights. By using the works and knowledges of each other, students and teachers alike, we seek out lessons to be learned for interdisciplinary approaches to sustainability, as well as for how to position and better argue the work of the individual student in larger discussions on planning for sustainability.

As such we will encourage and discuss thinking across silos and scales pertaining to both research ideas, theories and methods, and in investigating planning practices. In particular, the course will actively include and use the participant’s PhD projects as a platform for such discussions.

Finally, the course offers two opportunities:

1) that students can publish their papers in a special issue in the Nordic Journal of Urban Studies, see below.

2) that students, having paid the fee for participating in the course, can participate in the PLANNORD symposium on 25th-26th August, see https://www.en.plan.aau.dk/networks/plannord/2022/

Prerequisites

Being enrolled in a relevant PhD program.

Learning objectives

By the end of this course, the students will be capable of:

-describing, understanding and reflecting upon a selective and contemporary body of key trends, disciplines, knowledges and theories associated with Planning for Urban Sustainability,

-describing and understanding exemplary projects with an interdisciplinary approach to urbanization processes in Planning for Urban Sustainability,

-reflecting upon the position of their own project in relation to the need for more interdisciplinary approaches to ‘Planning for Urban Sustainability’,

-discussing their research design methods and tools in relation to how they may contribute to more interdisciplinary approaches in Planning for Urban Sustainability, and vice versa,

-discussing and reflecting upon how their project is a contribution to both their own field of research as well as more general discussions on ‘planning for sustainability’.

Registration

Participants need to register in two ways:

1) through the PhD school at AAU https://phd.moodle.aau.dk/course/view.php?id=1967 (in order for the PhD School to register your ECTS points), and

2) through the PLANNORD symposium site, https://www.en.plan.aau.dk/networks/plannord/2022/ (in order to pay the fee). NB: A link for registration will open up on this site in late April 2022.

It should be taken into account, that:

1) on 25th August the students will be an integrated part of the PLANNORD symposium in Aalborg (25th-26th August 2021)

2) by registering and paying the course fee, full participation in the PLANNORD symposium in Aalborg during 25th-26th August 2021 is offered freely for PhD students.

Student workload

3 or 5 ECTS (two options, to be freely selected by the student)

The 3 ECTS option: This option involves preparation before the course (readings, writing an abstract, and preparing a presentation) as well as participation in the course.

The 5 ETCS option: This option contain the same as the 3 ECTS option, however also including more writing activity (a paper) after the course. We have been offered the opportunity, that students can publish their papers in a special issue in the Nordic Journal of Urban Studies in early 2023, see https://www.idunn.no/journal/njus?languageId=2. The course responsible’s will act as editors of this issue.

Important: We will not ask for an abstract or a paper specifically tailored for this course – instead we prefer the use of the material you are already working on as part of your phd. Hence, we intend to help develop your own work further.

Teaching methods

Writing activities: we will ask for writings (abstract and/or paper) that are part of the work you already do or plan to do as a phd student. We welcome phd’s in all stages of their work – from newly established to matured projects. For those with aspirations to publish full papers (both for themselves as part of their phd publication plan, but also as part of the 5 ECTS option in the course) we can offer the opportunity to become part of a special issue in the Nordic Journal of Urban Studies, as mentioned above.

Participating in lectures

Presenting your own work

Participating in interactive activities to discuss and reflect upon each other’s work and how to position and present your own work in larger discussions and a wider context.

Finally, we are planning to create an interphase between the PhD course and the PLANNORD symposium, https://www.en.plan.aau.dk/networks/plannord/2022/, on 25th August. This will be part of the PhD course and give the students an opportunity to meet a wider group of planning researchers and professionals. The design of this part will be tailored in detail, when we know the number of participants in the course and their preferred choice of the 3 or 5 ECTS options. Please notice that, in any case, registering for the PhD course gives full access to the symposium on 25th and 26th August.


Criteria for Assessment

The students who deliver on the written activities, participate in the lectures and discussions, and deliver a final paper (paper only in the 5 ECTS option) will receive approval of the course and obtain the credits (3 or 5 ECTS). As indicated, we will explore the opportunity to publish papers in https://www.idunn.no/journal/njus?languageId=2

Key literature (inspiration and examples only: to be discussed, filtered and developed further):

Beatley, T. (2012) Sustainability in Planning: The Arc and Trajectory of a Movement, and New Directions for the Twenty-First-Century City, chapter 4 in: Sanyal, B. et al., Planning Ideas that Matter, MIT Press, Cambridge, USA, pp. 91-124.

Connell, D. J. (2009). Planning and its orientation to the future. International Planning Studies, 14(1), 85–98. https://doi.org/10.1080/13563470902741609

Davoudi S. & Madanipour (eds.) (2015) Reconsidering Localism, Routledge, Abingdon.

Davoudi, S. et al (2020) Reinventing planning and planners: Ideological decontestations and rhetorical appeals, Planning Theory, vol. 19(1), pp. 17-37.

Escobar, O. (2017) Pluralism and Democratic Participation: What kind of Citizens are Citizens Invited to be? Contemporary Pragmatism, 14, pp. 416-438.

Flyvbjerg, B. (2001) Making Social Science Matter: Why Social Inquiry Fails and How it can Succeed Again. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Galland, D. et al (2020) Conceptualising Metropolitan Regions: How Institutions, Policies, Spatial Imaginaries and Planning Are Influencing Metropolitan Development, chapter 1 in: Zimmermann, K. et al, (eds.) Metropolitan regions, planning and governance, Springer, pp. 1-21.

Glass, L.M. & Newig, J. (2019) Governance for achieving the Sustainable Development Goals: How important are participation, policy coherence, reflexivity, adaptation and democratic institutions?, Earth System Governance, 2, pp. 1-14.

Hansen C J, Azzopardi E, Béguier I, Ferguson L, Flannery W and Frangoudes K (2022) Building planning spaces for the integration of coastal and maritime cultural heritage in local and regional spatial development, Maritime Studies. https://rdcu.be/cJ8K0

Healey, P. (2010) Making Better Places: The Planning Project in the Twenty-First Century

Kristjánsdóttir, S. (ed.) (2018). Nordic Experiences of Sustaianble Planning. Routledge .

Marschütz, B., Bremer, S., Runhaar, H., Hegger, D., Mees, H., Vervoort, J., & Wardekker, A. (2020). Local narratives of change as an entry point for building urban climate resilience. Climate Risk Management, 28(July 2019), 100223. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.crm.2020.100223

Natarajan, L. (2017). Socio-spatial learning: A case study of community knowledge in participatory spatial planning. Progress in Planning, 111, 1-23. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.progress.2015.06.002

Olesen, K. & Hansen, C. J. (2020) Introducing Business Regions in Denmark: The ’Businessification’ of Strategic Spatial Planning? Journal of Environment and Planning C: Politics and Space, Vol. 38 (2), pp. 366-383.

Pizzo, B. (2015). Problematizing resilience: Implications for planning theory and practice. Cities, 43, 133–140. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cities.2014.11.015

Relevance for students in relation to their curriculum development

This course offers up to date lectures and knowledge on theories, methods and empirical insights concerning interdisciplinary approaches to Planning for Urban Sustainability.

Anchoring

The course is offered by international experts and researchers from the fields of urban and regional development and planning. In particular, the main body of researchers are recruited from the PLUS research group at PLAN, AAU. 

Scientific level

State of the Art. 

Social activities

There will be an informal gathering in the evening of the arrival day the 23rd. On the 24th there will be an opportunity to arrange an early dinner, and later in the evening the PhD students can join the opening reception for the PLANNORD symposium (the latter is included in the fee). Also, when registering and paying the fee, you can also join the symposium dinner on the 25th (extra fee). Lunches and coffee/tea is covered by the fee.

Organizer: Carsten Jahn Hansen (Official AAU PhD Programme organisor of this course)

Organising committee: Maria Wilke, Matthew Howells, Caroline Samson, Miriam Jensen, Nikolaj Grauslund Kristensen, Carsten Jahn Hansen (responsible), Raine Mäntysalo, Maria Håkansson, Knut Bjørn Stokke, Sigrídur Kristjánsdóttir (Tim Richardson?)

Lecturers: 

Presenters and facilitators (in process): Carsten Jahn Hansen (AAU), Raine Mäntysalo (Alto University, Finland), Maria Håkansson (Stockholm University), Tim Richardson (NMBU, Norway), Sigrídur Kristjánsdóttir (Agricultural University of Iceland). Researchers from the PLUS group at AAU.

ECTS:  3.0 or 5.0

Time: 24th-25th August 2022

Place: Aalborg University, Rendsburggade 14, 9000 Aalborg. Room 3.329

Number of seats: max 20

Deadline: 25 July 2022

Important information concerning PhD courses:
We have over some time experienced problems with no-show for both project and general courses. It has now reached a point where we are forced to take action. Therefore, the Doctoral School has decided to introduce a no-show fee of DKK 3.000 for each course where the student does not show up. Cancellations are accepted no later than 2 weeks before start of the course. Registered illness is of course an acceptable reason for not showing up on those days. Furthermore, all courses open for registration approximately four months before start. This can hopefully also provide new students a chance to register for courses during the year. We look forward to your registrations.




The course has been postponed to the fall 2022!

Description:
During this course a secetion of existing literature on two central positions in philosophy of technology -- postphenomenology and critical theory / critical constructivism -- will be discussed and scutinized. Focus will be on how technologies inform our interpretation of the world, how technology nudge humans to do certain things, how technology is value-ladden and embedded in power structures and normative regimes, and how technologies might exclude vulnerable groups and individuals. Course literature will include a double special issue of Techné entitled "Critical Constructivism and Postphenomenology: Ethics, Politics, and the Empirical" (vol 24, issue 1/2 plus selected case studies applying one of these two positions in an analysis of a technology. Everyone who studies technology, technological implementation and technological innovation in a socio-technical perspective will benefit from the course's thorough discussions and comparison of these two central positions in philosophy of technology, and is a must for ph.d. scholars who in their research touch upon how technologies inform our interpretation of the world, how technology nudge humans to do certain things, how technology is value-ladden and embedded in power structures and normative regimes, how technology excludes vulnerable groups and individuals.

Literature:

Prerequisites:
Basic knowledge of postphenomenology and critical theory of technology / critical constructivism.

Evaluation:

Organizer: 
Associate Professor Tom Børsen,  boersen@plan.aau.dk

 Lecturers: Associate Professor Tom Børsen, boersen@plan.aau.dk and Associate Professor Lars Botin, botin@plan.aau.dk

ECTS: 2

Time: TBA

Place: TBA


Number of seats: 
15


Deadline: 
TBA


Important information concerning PhD courses:
We have over some time experienced problems with no-show for both project and general courses. It has now reached a point where we are forced to take action. Therefore, the Doctoral School has decided to introduce a no-show fee of DKK 3.000 for each course where the student does not show up. Cancellations are accepted no later than 2 weeks before start of the course. Registered illness is of course an acceptable reason for not showing up on those days. Furthermore, all courses open for registration approximately four months before start. This can hopefully also provide new students a chance to register for courses during the year. We look forward to your registrations.


Description:
In this PhD course there will be focus on research design for how to study problem- and project-based learning by applying a mixed methods approach. Mixed methods are a comprehensive research design applying both qualitative and quantitative methods which can be combined in various ways depending on the research questions. 

The course will start by focusing on formulation of research questions in a PBL curriculum, followed by introduction to mixed methods designs and the advantages and disadvantages by different mixed methods combinations. 

The participants will work on a research design for one of four cases that will be presented to the participants. There will also be possibility to work on own research questions as well as research designs. 

There will be pre-tasks before the course will start. This will be sent out just after deadline for the course. And there will be a final reflection on the research design. 

Organizer: Xiangyun Du

Lecturers: Anette Kolmos, Thomas Ryberg

ECTS: 3.0

Time: 16-18 November 2022

Place: TBA

Number of seats: 14

Deadline: 26 October 2022

Important information concerning PhD courses:
We have over some time experienced problems with no-show for both project and general courses. It has now reached a point where we are forced to take action. Therefore, the Doctoral School has decided to introduce a no-show fee of DKK 3.000 for each course where the student does not show up. Cancellations are accepted no later than 2 weeks before start of the course. Registered illness is of course an acceptable reason for not showing up on those days. Furthermore, all courses open for registration approximately four months before start. This can hopefully also provide new students a chance to register for courses during the year.
We look forward to your registrations.


Description: 

Sustainability transitions are inherently future-oriented. With sustainability transition research, we are making particular futures. Everywhere we look, societal actors are "predicting" the future when it comes to developing strategies and assigning responsibilities and spaces for action in sustainability transitions. Scenarios are often used to depict potential climate futures, as well as political visions and strategies for (future) sustainable societies. However, what is much less explicity dealt with, is that all methods for "predicting" the future come with a set of normative expectations about what a sustainable future is, how it can be achieved and who (should) take part in devloping it. While foresight and scenario building are known practices in sustainability transition research, they tend to extrapolate from existing ways of life. With the increasing need for making radical societal transitions towards sustainable futures (latest argued by IPCC 2021), (other) resources that enable thinking about and imagining such radical change are increasingly needed. As part of this process, it is helpful to think of 'the future' as an analytical object. The field of ‘social futures’ seeks to explore the critical role that understandings of, and orientations to, the future play in processes of social change. Shifting the perspective from a reified view of the future as something given (a neutral temporal space into which (objective) expectations can be projected) to viewing the future as a field of projectivity means recognising the profound link between futurity, agency and social action. Parallel to this, an emerging body of work around ‘futuring’ enable us to imagine radically different future alternatives, by drawing on world building techniques, or as Donna Haraway would put it; world-ing techniques. This course provides a critical take on ‘future-making’ and the methods and tools that are used, by discussing what the methods assume about the future, what it should consist of, how it should be done and by (and with) whom. The course also provides a space for exploring creative futuring techniques that embraces these questions, and which enable imagination. Creative methods for futuring and imagination will be presented through a workshop format, where students will try the methods in groups. The students complete the course by atteding the course and workshops, and by writing a short critical reflection piece about what their scientific fields assume about futures.


Literature:


Prerequisites:

PhD students attending the course should:
1) be enrolled in a phd program that focuses on sustainability and/or sustainable transitions
2) be interested in exploring what their scientific fields might assume about futures, and
3) be interested in trying different methods of futuring.


Evaluation:


Organizer: Associate Professor Charlotte Louise Jensen, cjensen@plan.aau.dk

 
Lecturers: Charlotte Louise Jensen and Jens Stissing Jensen

ECTS: 3

Time:  November 2022 - 3 day workshop.

Place: TBA


Number of seats: 
15


Deadline: TBA

Important information concerning PhD courses:
We have over some time experienced problems with no-show for both project and general courses. It has now reached a point where we are forced to take action. Therefore, the Doctoral School has decided to introduce a no-show fee of DKK 3.000 for each course where the student does not show up. Cancellations are accepted no later than 2 weeks before start of the course. Registered illness is of course an acceptable reason for not showing up on those days. Furthermore, all courses open for registration approximately four months before start. This can hopefully also provide new students a chance to register for courses during the year. We look forward to your registrations.


Description:
There is an increasing interest to develop tools, methods, theories and knowledge on how to support design and planning processes that are part of sustainable transitions. This emerging interest builds upon a scholarship on Sustainable Transitions, Innovation Studies, Science and Technology Studies, Design, Strategic Planning and Engineering. The course will provide the students with a state of the art of this academic initiative and an overview of examples of Design for Sustainable Transitions projects in Finland, Australia, Denmark and the US.

Literature:

Prerequisites:
Be a PhD student in a field related to design or planning with a sustainability perspective.

Evaluation:

Organizer: Associate Professor Andrés Felipe Valderrama Pinedaafvp@plan.aau.dk 


Lecturers: 
Idil Gaziulusoy (Aalto University); Charlotte Jensen, Monia Niero, Michael Søgaard Jørgensen, Christian Clausen, Jens S Jensen, Birgitte Hoffman, Maj-Britt Quitzau, Andrés Felipe Valderrama Pineda (Aalborg University)


ECTS:
 5


Time:
 16-18 March 2022


Place:
 TBA


Number of seats: 15


Deadline: 31 January 2022


Important information concerning PhD courses:

We have over some time experienced problems with no-show for both project and general courses. It has now reached a point where we are forced to take action. Therefore, the Doctoral School has decided to introduce a no-show fee of DKK 3.000 for each course where the student does not show up. Cancellations are accepted no later than 2 weeks before start of the course. Registered illness is of course an acceptable reason for not showing up on those days. Furthermore, all courses open for registration approximately four months before start. This can hopefully also provide new students a chance to register for courses during the year. We look forward to your registrations.


Description:
The course introduces potentials and challenges to circular economy from a business perspective, an urban perspective, and a societal perspective. Theoretically, the course integrates theories about life cycles, value chains, social practices, user-oriented innovation and governance.

The linear 'take-make-dispose' economic model is reaching its limits, and initiatives to develop alternative business models, models for urban development, and societal models are emerging. Circular economy is getting a lot of attention as one of these models. 

However, the concept of circular economy is not without shortcomings as strategy for sustainable development. Currently, focus is too much on closing existing material flows through recycling, without trying to understand the dynamics of the present linear economy and questioning why we produce what, and why products become obsolete, and how products’ lifetime could become longer.

Three types of re-design processes, which are necessary to consider when developing circular economy business models based on prolonged product lifetime and sharing economy, are discussed: 1) Re-designing products and services with changes in the roles of products, users, service, infrastructure, etc. 2) Re-designing value chains both up-stream and down-stream. 3) Internal redesigning of the involved businesses in order to integrate environmental concerns in innovation and strategy development. From an urban perspective, different roles in developing and supporting circular economy initiatives are introduced: 1) Public planning, 2) Providing public infrastructures, 3) Public procurement, 4) Construction and operation of public buildings 5) Facilitating local community and business development.

From a societal perspective, the acceleration society and its self-enforcing acceleration cycle based on technological acceleration, accelerated social changes and increased life speed are introduced as theory for the linear economy. Focus on social aspects of product obsolescence, on sufficiency, and on more synchronization between innovation and democracy are discussed as elements in transition towards a more environmentally, socially and economic sustainable society.

The course is evaluated through active participation, a presentation of own research during the PhD course and an assignment written after the PhD course.

Organizers: Michael Søgaard Jørgensen and Arne Remmen

Lecturers: Michael Søgaard Jørgensen, Arne Remmen, Monia Niero, Julia Nussholz

ECTS: 5.0

Time: March 7 - 9, 2022.

Place: TBA

Number of seats: 30

Deadline: February 28, 2022

Important information concerning PhD courses:
We have over some time experienced problems with no-show for both project and general courses. It has now reached a point where we are forced to take action. Therefore, the Doctoral School has decided to introduce a no-show fee of DKK 3.000 for each course where the student does not show up. Cancellations are accepted no later than 2 weeks before start of the course. Registered illness is of course an acceptable reason for not showing up on those days. Furthermore, all courses open for registration approximately four months before start. This can hopefully also provide new students a chance to register for courses during the year.
We look forward to your registrations.

 

 


Description:
Theories of practice has a long history within the social sciences, which include the work of prominent scholars such as Bourdieu and Giddens. However, more recent accounts of practice theory offered by Theodor Schatzki and Andreas Reckwitz has led to a renewed engagement, for example by referring to a “practice turn” within the social sciences, and by Allan Warde’s introduction to the field of sociology of consumption from 2005. The variety of these contributions also means that there is no unified account of practice theory. However, family resemblances are found in emphasizing routinized activity, shared (embodied) understanding and the role of materiality in the performance of social practices. Practice theory is quite widespread within for instance studies of consumption and innovation, whereas it in broader approaches of social sciences still appears as a fairly new but promising research agenda. For this course, we have chosen the following topics that each comprise a session, where we will both be looking back, at the roots/history/conceptualization and looking forward at the change and empirical application related to the theme. The themes, which will be covered, comprise:

 - Including conscious or ethical consumption in understandings of theories of practice (Prof. Kirsten Gram-Hanssen, Aalborg University)

 - Reproduction of practices: The role of previous experience and social relations (Senior Researcher Anders Rhiger Hansen)

- How to conceptualize materiality and the role of non-humans in the performance of practices (Prof. Kirsten Gram-Hanssen, Aalborg University)

- Researching (natural) experiments, such as music festival and covid by the use of practice theories (MSC postdoc Tullia Jack)

- Researching Interventions and changes in practices. (Associate professor Charlotte Louise Jensen)

Each of these sessions consist of a lecture, where relevant literature is presented and discussed, followed by a workshop. The course requires familiarity with the foundation of theories of practice. You need thus to have a basic understanding of theories of practice from reading authors as Allan Warde, Andreas Reckwitz, Elisabeth Shove or Theodore Schatzki

Literature:

Prerequisites:
You need to have a basic understanding of theories of practice from reading authors as Allan Warde, Andreas Reckwitz, Elisabet Shove or Theodore Schatzki


Evaluation:


Organizer: Professor Kirsten Gram-Hanssen, kgh@Build.aau.dk

Lecturers: Anders Rhiger Hansen, Tullia Jack, Charlotte Louise Jensen and Kirsten Gram-Hanssen

ECTS: 3

Time:
  21-23 March 2022 - 3 days

Place: TBA

Number of seats: 18

Deadline: February 28, 2022

 

Important information concerning PhD courses:
We have over some time experienced problems with no-show for both project and general courses. It has now reached a point where we are forced to take action. Therefore, the Doctoral School has decided to introduce a no-show fee of DKK 3.000 for each course where the student does not show up. Cancellations are accepted no later than 2 weeks before start of the course. Registered illness is of course an acceptable reason for not showing up on those days. Furthermore, all courses open for registration approximately four months before start. This can hopefully also provide new students a chance to register for courses during the year. We look forward to your registrations.


Description:
The course aims at strengthening skills in life cycle inventory analysis. The course targets the development of advanced competences in LCA by applying the problem based-learning (PBL) teaching model that focuses on learning by doing and reflection. The course activities will include intensive group work, problem defining and solving applied to real-word cases, practical exercises, and discussion sessions or workshops. The target audience of the course is academics (PhDs, postdoc, other) or professionals who already have basic experience with LCA and intend to bring their LCA competences to an advanced level. Basic experience means for example having carried out simple LCAs before or having elementary knowledge of LCA theory. The course content is organized in three modules (main teacher in parenthesis). The course includes a mix of online and physical lectures. Part of each module is delivered using a flipped-classroom approach and pre-recorded videos that are provided to the students in advance. The physical lectures instead focus on hands-on exercises targeted to the completion of a portfolio and in discussion as well as Q&A rounds.

Module 1. Intro to advanced LCA (Massimo Pizzol)
In this hands-on module students will learn how to use the software Brightway2 for LCA research. Topics covered: Computational structure of LCA. Computer simulation and statistical approaches for uncertainty and sensitivity analysis in LCA. LCA reproducibility and data sharing. The module includes exercises.

Module 2. Consequential LCA (Bo Weidema)
Students will learn the fundamentals of Consequential LCA. Topics covered: Introduction to attributional and consequential models. Algorithms for performing consequential LCA in the definition of functional unit, consumptions mix, and identification of determining and dependent co-products. Communicating consequential models. The module includes exercises.

Module 3. Input output LCA (Jannick Schmidt)
Students will learn the fundamentals of Input-Output modelling. Topics covered: Supply-use tables, multi-regional models and trade linking. Integrating Process LCA and IO-analyses via hybrid LCA, tiered and embedded. The module includes exercises.

Prices:

Attendee / Price*
PhD students affiliated to a Danish University / Free
PhD students not affiliated to a Danish University / 4.500 DKK (600 EUR)
Academics (e.g. postdoc and professors) / 9.000 DKK (1.200 EUR)
Professionals (consultancy, industry, etc.) / 18.000 DKK (2.400 EUR)
*Prices do not cover meals or accommodation

Organizer:
The course is organized by The Technical Doctoral School of IT and Design, Aalborg University and Danish Centre for Environmental Assessment (DCEA) www.DCEA.dk, in collaboration with the International Life Cycle Academy (ILCA) www.ILCA.es

Lecturers:
Bo Weidema, Professor
Jannick Schmidt, Associate Professor
Massimo Pizzol, Associate Professor
Søren Løkke, Associate Professor
Agneta Ghose, Postdoc

Registration and info:
Please apply via mail to the course organizer Massimo Pizzol (massimo@plan.aau.dk). You must provide the following information in the email: Full name / Profession (PhD student, postdoc, consultant…) / Institution name / Address / email address / Phone nr / your research field of PhD topic / your experience with LCA.

ECTS: 5.0

ECTS Distribution:
The five ECTS credits of the course are divided roughly in this way:

Activity

Hours

ECTS

Lectures and group work in class

50

1.8

Readings

35

1.3

Group work prior to course

20

0.7

Group work after course

35

1.3

Total

140

5.0

*One ECTS credit is equivalent to 28 hours of work

Activities: Includes attending to the lectures and performing exercises in class.

Readings: Approx. 100 pages of scientific articles and reports, that are provided to the students, plus python tutorials and videos.

Group work: Students work in groups (max 5 people). Each group will work on a case study and apply the knowledge of the course on the case study.

EXAMPLE, a group works on an LCA of a product and does:

-          Prior to the course: choice of product and data mining, getting base knowledge and data to describe the products system.

-          During the course (exercises in class): consequential inventory with matrix format, IO LCA inventory, inclusion of iLUC, inclusion of social impacts, etc.

-          After the course: organize the material and prepare a portfolio/article where all the techniques are presented for the case study.

Eventually, all portfolios are made available. Each student will thus get the info on five different cases. Students should be able to organize themselves using online tools (skype, dropbox etc) to collaborate in group remotely prior and after the course.

Time: The equivalent of 6 full-days distributed between weeks 19-22

Place: TBA

Number of seats: 25

Deadline: 15 March 2022

Important information concerning PhD courses:
We have over some time experienced problems with no-show for both project and general courses. It has now reached a point where we are forced to take action. Therefore, the Doctoral School has decided to introduce a no-show fee of DKK 3.000 for each course where the student does not show up. Cancellations are accepted no later than 2 weeks before start of the course. Registered illness is of course an acceptable reason for not showing up on those days. Furthermore, all courses open for registration approximately four months before start. This can hopefully also provide new students a chance to register for courses during the year.
We look forward to your registrations.