Description:

This PhD course focuses on writing your methodology chapter in a manner that is thorough, transparent, reflective, and reflexive and is especially intended for students using qualitative, applied, field-based, and/or action-oriented approaches.
Moreover, this course takes a problem-based approach and aims to meet students’ needs in addition to covering essential elements of writing a methodology chapter (or sections in your synthesis). Additionally. the course will attend especially to the issue of when research does not go according to plan and how social scientists and other researchers are starting to ‘expose’ and learn from methodological ‘failures.’ Depending on student interest, the course may also delve into new ethical considerations on automated transcription or other AI-assisted methods. Although there are courses oriented toward learning about qualitative methods and planning/crafting one’s (intended) research design, this course starts where these leave off: what to do about ‘writing up’ and explaining the considerations, choices, modes of analysis, and how you position yourself within your research.

Prerequisites:

Students enrolled in PhD program and at a point where they are writing their methodology (or at least a portion of it) and reflecting on what transpired in the field/during data collection. The course is especially for a student whose PhD has not quite gone according to plan and must address a level of ‘messiness’ increasingly associated with social research and qualitative, mixed methods, field research. 

Students doing qualitative or mixed method research are especially welcome in this course

Learning objectives:

1. Reflect on own methodology from conceptualization to actualization
2. Understand what makes for a ‘good’ methodology chapter for your discipline/epistemological approach
3. Recognize differences in methodological ‘standards’ for quantitative versus qualitative research (including mixed methods variations)
4. Improve writing on methods and methodology in terms of transparency, positionality, and other considerations relevant to your approach

Teaching methods:

This course will be run in a workshop style and be oriented toward the problems/challenges facing enrolled students in terms of writing up their methodology chapters/sections. There will be some introductory lectures and discussions based on course readings, but we will focus on ‘writing up’ and thus students will be expected to provide drafts for peer review and critique from the instructor and course participants.

1st encounter: 2 days of lectures/discussion/exercises and getting to know one another and the methodological challenges to be addressed.
1 month interim: time for writing your draft, exchanging drafts, and preparing for the workshop
2nd encounter (1 month later): 3 days of methodology workshop
Post course: complete peer review

Criteria for assessment:

Active participation in the course including brief presentation of ‘methodology challenge you wish to tackle’; submitted draft of methodology chapter/section before workshop; high-quality, peer review completed (post workshop)

Organizer: Kristen Ounanian
Lecturers: Kristen Ounanian

ECTS: 4

Time: September 19,20 and October 31 and November 1,2, 2022

Place: Aalborg University

Zip code: 
9220

City: Aalborg

Number of seats: 12

Deadline: August 30, 2022


Important information concerning PhD courses: We have over some time experienced problems with no-show for both project and general courses. It has now reached a point where we are forced to take action. Therefore, the Doctoral School has decided to introduce a no-show fee of DKK 3.000 for each course where the student does not show up. Cancellations are accepted no later than 2 weeks before start of the course. Registered illness is of course an acceptable reason for not showing up on those days. Furthermore, all courses open for registration approximately four months before start. This can hopefully also provide new students a chance to register for courses during the year. We look forward to your registrations.


Introduction to Qualitative Methods for a non-social scientist 

Topic, background and motivation for the course.

The purpose of the course is to provide students with basic knowledge about – and an introductory overview of - commonly used qualitative research methods. Taking qualitative research as a point of departure, the course provides researchers with tools for identifying strengths and weaknesses of different research methods and approaches. Thus, the course encourages young researchers to critically reflect on, assess and academically justify their research design choices in view of their specific topic of research enquiry. This facilitates benefitting from the strengths of different research methods and approaches while compensating for their weaknesses.

The course is motivated by the recognized need for methodological insights and reflection among researchers working within particularly interdisciplinary fields of research.

 

Learning objectives:

The course aims to provide students with an all-round introduction to the basics of qualitative research. Selected qualitative research strategies are illustrated via best-case examples.

Students are introduced to the basic elements of qualitative research design, including the main research paradigms and their ontological and epistemological underpinnings. Overall, the course aims to provide students with sufficient methodological insights and background knowledge to identify the qualitative methods and research approaches that may best match their specific topic of research enquiry.

Upon course completion, students should also be able to critically reflect of and identify methodological strengths, weaknesses, challenges and potentials of given qualitative research designs and approaches.

Target group:

The course targets PhD students who are not familiar with – or only slightly familiar with - qualitative research methods. Perhaps students from a more technical background who wish to use qualitative methods in their research, or students who will be collaborating closely with qualitative researchers in multidisciplinary, cross-disciplinary, or interdisciplinary research projects. The course is also beneficial for students who wish to brush up on their basic qualitative research skills.

 

Criteria for course participation:

Many of the course exercises relate directly to your own research project and the (potential) use of qualitative research methods in that research. To participate in the course, then, ‘thinking through’ your research in this way should make sense to you as a researcher.

Perhaps you know that you will use qualitative methods in your research. Perhaps you have already started your qualitative research enquiry, or perhaps you are seriously considering using some qualitative methods in your research, but you are not yet quite sure.

Teaching methods:

A mix of lectures, group discussions in smaller and larger fora, student presentations and readings.

Criteria for assessment:

Active participation and a pass/fail short reflective paper, presentation or similar, on qualitative methods.

Literature list.

The course literature is listed below. This list of literature will be adapted. The numbering represents our recommended order of reading … but you don’t have to follow this recommendation, of course.

 

Primary literature
1 Guion, L. a. (2006). Conducting an In-depth Interview 1. Boards, 1–4. https://doi.org/http://greenmedicine.ie/school/images/Library/Conducting%20An%20In%20Depth%20Interview.pdf (Module 1)

2 Saunders, M., Lewis, P., & Thornhill, A. (2019).
Chapter 4: Understanding research philosophy and approaches to theory developmentResearch Methods for Business Students (8th ed.). Harlow: Pearson Education Limited. (Module 1)

3 Brinkmann, S., & Kvale, S. (2004). Interviews. Learning the craft of qualitative research interviewing
(3
rd revise). SAGE Publications Inc. (Module 1) Chapters 1, 2, 6, 7, 8, 11

4 Kinney, P. (2017). Walking Interviews. Social Research Update, (67), 1–22.
https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-10-2779-6_28-1 (Module 1)

5 Berger, R. (2015). Now I see it, now I don’t: researcher’s position and reflexivity in qualitative research.
Qualitative Research15(2), 219–234. https://doi.org/10.1177/1468794112468475 (Module 1)

Flyvbjerg, B. (2006). Five misunderstandings about case-study research. Qualitative Inquiry12(2), 219–
245. https://doi.org/10.1177/1077800405284363 (Module 1)

Siggelkow, N. (2007). Persuasion with Case Studies - Siggelkow - S1&2 R1.pdf. Source: The Academy of Management Journal50(1), 20–24. https://doi.org/10.5465/AMJ.2007.24160882 (Module 1)

8 Johnson, R. B., & Onwuegbuzie, A. J. (2004). Mixed Methods Research : A Research Paradigm Whose Time Has Come. Educational Researcher33(7), 14–26. https://doi.org/10.3102/0013189X033007014 (Module 1)

9 Rogers, M. (2012). Contextualizing Theories and Practices of Bricolage Research. The Qualitative Report17, 1–17. (Module 1)

10 Harper, D. (2002). Talking about pictures: A case for photo elicitation. Visual Studies17(1), 13–26.
https://doi.org/10.1080/14725860220137345 (Module 1)

11 Pink, S. (2007). Walking with video. Visual Studies22(240–252). (Module 1) 

12 Brinkmann, S., & Kvale, S. (2004). Interviews. Learning the craft of qualitative research interviewing (3rd
revise). SAGE Publications Inc. (Mostly module 2) Chapters 12, 13, 15

13 Morgan, David L. (1997): Focus groups as qualitative research. 2nd edition. London: Sage Publications. (Mostly module 2) Chapters 1, 4 and 5 (pp. 1-7 and pp. 31-64).
 
Secondary literature:
Hydén, L.-C. & Bülow, P. H. (2003): Who’s talking: drawing conclusions from focus groups – some methodological considerations. International journal of Social Research Methodology 6(4): 305-321. doi.org/10.1080/13645570210124865

Jones-Devitt, S., Austen, L., & Parkin, H. (2017). Integrative Reviewing for exploring complex phenomena. Social Research Update, (66), 1–4.

Atkinson, P., & Hammersley, M. (1994). Ethnography and Participant Observation. In N. K. Denzin & Y. S. Lincoln (Eds.), Handbook of Qualitative Research (pp. 248–261). 

Organizer: Post-doc Line Valdorff Madsen (lvm@build.aau.dk), post-doc Katinka Johansen (katinka.johansen@soc.lu.se)

Lecturers: Katinka Johansen & Line Valdorff Madsen

ECTS: 5.0

Time: 4-6 April 2022 and 5-6 May 2022, from 09.00

Place: Online (4-6 April) and AAU-CPH (5-6 May)

Zip code: 
2450

City: Copenhagen campus

Number of seats: 15

Deadline: 14 March 2022

Important information concerning PhD courses: We have over some time experienced problems with no-show for both project and general courses. It has now reached a point where we are forced to take action. Therefore, the Doctoral School has decided to introduce a no-show fee of DKK 3.000 for each course where the student does not show up. Cancellations are accepted no later than 2 weeks before start of the course. Registered illness is of course an acceptable reason for not showing up on those days. Furthermore, all courses open for registration approximately four months before start. This can hopefully also provide new students a chance to register for courses during the year.
We look forward to your registrations


Welcome to Understanding theory of science

Description:
Theory of science is an attempt to comprehend science, in order to better identify it, shape it, guide it, and perhaps endorse or denounce it. To do this theory of science use philosophical topics, such as epistemology, ontology and axiology. Other fields, like sociology and semiotics, also form the theoretical and methodological base for the analysis of science. In some sense, theory of science is a form of meta-scientific inquiry, but it is also a form of reflexivity within science itself.

Every scientist, Ph.D. students perhaps more than others, can at times come to find themselves in need of “thinking things through”. Whether it springs out of doubt, or from the need to defend, or something third, is of lesser importance. The point is merely that every once in a while we need to carefully consider the science that we represent, in order to locate or re-locate ourselves in it or to justify the enterprise we’re involved with. The quality of our scientific work will undoubtable benefit from our ability to better comprehend the fundamental conditions, values and presumptions that more or less explicitly forms the scientific requirements and expectations in the first place.

This course offers the opportunity to practice the art of theory of science, to better acquaint oneself with the field, and to learn how to apply its thoughts and positions to the science and the scientist of one’s own. The focus of the course will be current problems in theory of science that are relevant for research in the health sciences and the technological and natural sciences. These topics could be issues of measurement, facts, objectivism, and ‘evidence-based’; but also issues like stakeholders, the role and influence of tools, peer-review and reductionism.

The course will be topic oriented workshops or seminars, with the lecturer as a presenter, but more importantly as a facilitator of qualified deliberation on the topics. The sessions will therefore require active participation and an open mind from everyone involved.

I look forward to some wonderful joint explorations into some meaningful topics of relevance and value for the quality of ourselves and of our work.  

 

Organizer: Associate Professor Patrik Kristoffer Kjærsdam Telléus, pkt@hst.aau.dk

Lecturers: Associate Professor Patrik Kristoffer Kjærsdam Telléus

ECTS: 2

Time: May 18, 19, 20 and 23, 2022

Place:  Aalborg University, Frederiks Bajers Vej 7G, room 5-109, all days.

Number of seats: 15

Deadline: April 27, 2022


Important information concerning PhD courses: We have over some time experienced problems with no-show for both project and general courses. It has now reached a point where we are forced to take action. Therefore, the Doctoral School has decided to introduce a no-show fee of DKK 3.000 for each course where the student does not show up. Cancellations are accepted no later than 2 weeks before start of the course. Registered illness is of course an acceptable reason for not showing up on those days. Furthermore, all courses open for registration approximately four months before start. This can hopefully also provide new students a chance to register for courses during the year. We look forward to your registrations.


Welcome to Ethics and Social Responsibilities for Scientists and Engineers in the 21st Century

Description: The course addresses ethical dilemmas that researchers might face in turbulent times, where clear-cut distinctions between pure and applied science can no longer be upheld, and try to create a space where the participating PhD students can qualify their reflections on their role as young researchers by drawing on philosophical, sociological, and ethical perspectives in analyzing possibilities and problems of contemporary science, engineering and technology. During the course the participants are asked to ethically analyze their own PhD projects, and present their analyses. To facilitate the ethical analyses of PhD projects a number of topical case-studies and relevant analytical tools are presented.

You will find all course information here on Moodle. You will find the texts and the tasks for each day in one folder.

The course is designed so that each day is split up into two sessions: One before lunch and one after. Usually a session begins with a lecture (90 minutes, including breaks) followed by discussions or group work.

During the last session on the third day participants are kindly asked to do a PP presentation on ethical issues in their Ph.D. project (duration: no more than 15 minutes). We will use the group work and discussions during the first two days to qualify your presentation. It is, however a good idea, to begin reflecting on ethical issues in your project when you read the course material.

Reading the text material connected to the lectures, and preparing a PP presentation on ethical aspects of your Ph.D. project, are mandatory activities for all participants.

I hope you will have some enlightening and reflective days.

Best Regards Tom Børsen


Organizer: Associate Professor Tom Børsen - boersen@plan.aau.dk

Lecturers: Associate Professor Tom Børsen - boersen@plan.aau.dk
Honorary Associate Professor Klavs Birkholm - birkholm@plan.aau.dk

ECTS: 2.5

Time: TBA

Place: TBA 

Number of seats: 30

Deadline: TBA


Important information concerning PhD courses: We have over some time experienced problems with no-show for both project and general courses. It has now reached a point where we are forced to take action. Therefore, the Doctoral School has decided to introduce a no-show fee of DKK 3.000 for each course where the student does not show up. Cancellations are accepted no later than 2 weeks before start of the course. Registered illness is of course an acceptable reason for not showing up on those days. Furthermore, all courses open for registration approximately four months before start. This can hopefully also provide new students a chance to register for courses during the year. We look forward to your registrations.

Welcome to Interdisciplinary Research Design (2022)

Description: Many PhD projects at Aalborg University are ‘born interdisciplinary’. Equally, there is an increasing value attached to the interdisciplinary theme in the research funding community and public debate. Regardless hereof the tools and skills for thinking about interdisciplinary research designs has not been addressed and developed sufficiently amongst PhD students. The course is therefore motivated by this gap. It targets all PhD students with projects that are interdisciplinary either as a key feature of their initial design (‘born interdisciplinary’), or the ones that incrementally moves towards this as a function of an emerging awareness to the importance of an expanded research design during the process (‘becoming interdisciplinary’). Next to this existing gap in interdisciplinary research skills the course is motivated by an observation made over several years, namely that different scientific disciplines only is one level of needed cross-fertilization. Another is the ability to move more effortless across different methods, either in order to triangulate, or simply because of the nature of the research question. The so-called ‘problem-based-learning’ (PBL) research model need to take an interdisciplinary approach that includes actual scientific disciplines and their theoretical and conceptual apparatuses, as well as the multitude of methods of relevance to complex and real-life research questions. Finally, the course is motivated by an interest in bringing such an increased interdisciplinary awareness and skill-development in sync with the requirements for contemporary research dissemination and communication.

Learning objectives: The main learning objective is that the PhD student becomes able to identify the relevant dimensions of interdisciplinary research design in her or his own project (either as what is there from the outset (‘born’) or what might be implemented during the research process (‘becoming’). Next, participants must be able to develop a motivated and well-argued plan for any interdisciplinary research design proposal amendments.  

Key Literature: Some of the key literature within Interdisciplinary research is set as the curriculum (see below). However, given the critical and explorative nature of the course we shall also look into readings that may look less obvious, but which have the critical creative potential for stimulating new ideas and thoughts.

Bark, R. H., M. E. Kragt & B. J. Robson (2016) Evaluating an interdisciplinary research project: Lessons learned for organisations, researchers and funders, International Journal of Project Management, 34 (2016) 1449–1459

Barry, A., G. Born & G. Weszkalnys (2008) Logics of interdisciplinarity, Economy and Society, 37:1, 20-49

Benson, T. C. (1982) Five Arguments Against Interdisciplinary Studies, Issues in Integrative Studies No.1 38-48 

Committee on Facilitating Interdisciplinary Research, Committee on Science, Engineering, and Public Policy (2004) Facilitating interdisciplinary research. National Academies. Washington: National Academy Press

Darbellay, F. (2012) The circulation of knowledge as an interdisciplinary process: Travelling concepts, analogies, and metaphors, Issues in Interdisciplinary Studies 30, 1-18

Dupré, J. A (2014) Process ontology for biology. Philos. Mag. 81–88 (2014)

Jessop, B. & N. Sum (2001) Pre-disciplinary and Post-disciplinary Perspectives, New Political Economy, January 89-101

Lakoff, G. & M. Johnson (1980) Metaphors We Live By, Chicago: University of Chicago Press, pp. 3-33

Menken, S. & M. Keestrea (2016) An Introduction to Interdisciplinary Research. Theory & Practice, Amsterdam: Amsterdam University Press (KEY READING!)

Rigney, D. (2001) The Metaphorical Society. An Invitation to Social Theory, Oxford: Rowman & Littlefield, pp. 1-12 (chapter one: The Metaphorical Imagination)

Sayer, A. (2000) For Postdisciplinary Studies: Sociology and the Curse of Disciplinary Parochialism/Imperialism, in J. Eldridge, J. MacInnes, S. Scott, C. Warhurst and A. Witz (eds) (2000) For Sociology: Legacies and Prospects, Durham: Sociology Press, pp. 83-91

Schön, D. A. (1993) Generative Metaphor: a perspective on problem-setting in social policy, In A. Ortony (ed.) Metaphor and Thought. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 137-163


Organizer: Professor Ole B. Jensen - obje@create.aau.dk

Lecturers: Post-doc Zakaria Djebbara and Ole B. Jensen

ECTS: 2,5 (without essay) or 4 (with essay)

Time: 07 November 2022 - 09 November 2022.

Place: Aalborg University, Frb 7G/4-110

Zip code:
9200

City: Aalborg

Number of seats: 15

Deadline: 17 October 2022


Important information concerning PhD courses: We have over some time experienced problems with no-show for both project and general courses. It has now reached a point where we are forced to take action. Therefore, the Doctoral School has decided to introduce a no-show fee of DKK 3.000 for each course where the student does not show up. Cancellations are accepted no later than 2 weeks before start of the course. Registered illness is of course an acceptable reason for not showing up on those days. Furthermore, all courses open for registration approximately four months before start. This can hopefully also provide new students a chance to register for courses during the year. We look forward to your registrations.