WELCOME TO TRANSLATIONAL NEUROBIOLOGY OF THE PAIN SYSTEM XXV: ANTI-NOCICEPTIVE AND PRO-NOCICEPTIVE MECHANISMS IN THE TRANSITION FROM ACUTE TO PROLONGED PAIN

Description:

This is the twenty-fifth annual international Ph.D. course on the translational neurobiology of the pain system. The purpose of the course is to introduce different aspects of the neurobiology of the pain system and to initiate new co-operation in interdisciplinary pain research. This year the course will focus on translational aspects of anti-nociceptive and pro-nociceptive mechanisms, especially how they can be assessed and their manifestations in acute and chronic pain conditions. This topic will be covered with basic and clinical perspectives.

The lectures will be given by staff from Center for Neuroplasticity and Pain, SMI (Aalborg University), by invited international key scientists within the area, and relevant industrial partners.

Literature: Selected papers and book chapters will be announced to the participants shortly before the course.

Prerequisites: A basic understanding of pain mechanisms, for update see Textbook of Pain, Section 1: Neurobiology of Pain.

Evaluation: The couse will end with a multiple-choice evaluation with questions related to all topics of the course.

Fee: A parcipation fee will be charged for catering (amount TBA).

Organiser: Professor Thomas Graven-Nielsen, email: tgn@hst.aau.dk

Lecturers: Invited internal and external speakers

ECTS: 1.0

Dates: 25 and 26 November 2020 (9.00 - 16.00)

Place: Aalborg University, Niels Jernes Vej 14, room 4-111

Deadline: 5 November 2020

Number of seats: 30

Important information concerning PhD courses: We have over some time experienced problems with no-show for both project and general courses. It has now reached a point where we are forced to take action. Therefore, the Doctoral School has decided to introduce a no-show fee of DKK 3,000 for each course where the student does not show up. Cancellations are accepted no later than 2 weeks before start of the course. Registered illness is of course an acceptable reason for not showing up on those days. Furthermore, all courses open for registration approximately four months before start. This can hopefully also provide new students a chance to register for courses during the year. We look forward to your registrations.



Description:

The purpose of this course is to work as a team and gain a state-of-the-art understanding of technologies pushing the boundaries within neuroscience and neurophysiology.  A focus will be how these technologies originated and how these new technologies are being applied to understand disease and pathologies better as well how to treat and rehabilitate.  The technologies covered in this course will range from advances in movement control and tracking, cortical neuroplasticity (TMS mapping), exoskeleton, virtual reality, brain-computer interfaces.  The course and participant will work as group reviewing, analyzing and brainstorming new applications and discussions about future directions and how these technologies can improve health and well-being form a societal perspective. The course will serve to enlighten as well as prepare for ‘big thinking and high risk’ project development.  Additionally the course will cover how these technologies can be used to treat and rehabilitate patients with persistent pain, losses in motor function, or to manage, for example, Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s disease. 

Literature: Selected papers and resources are given before and during the course.

Prerequisites: Basic knowledge of neuroscience and physiology.

Evaluation: Evaluation is based on contributions to predifined discussion topics requiring the student to research and prepare questions as weel as short and simple 10 min presentation.

Organiser: Associate Professor Shellie Boudreau, email: sboudreau@hst.aau.dk

Lecturers: Associate Professor Shellie Boudreau, Associate Professor Andrew James Stevenson and invited speakers

ECTS: 1.0

Dates: 1, 4 and 5 May 2020 (01.05: 8:30 - 12:00; 04. & 05.05: 8:30 - 10:30)

Place: Aalborg University, Fredrik Bajers Vej 7E, room E3-209

Deadline: 8 April 2020

Number of seats: 12

Important information concerning PhD courses: We have over some time experienced problems with no-show for both project and general courses. It has now reached a point where we are forced to take action. Therefore, the Doctoral School has decided to introduce a no-show fee of DKK 3,000 for each course where the student does not show up. Cancellations are accepted no later than 2 weeks before start of the course. Registered illness is of course an acceptable reason for not showing up on those days. Furthermore, all courses open for registration approximately four months before start. This can hopefully also provide new students a chance to register for courses during the year. We look forward to your registrations.

 

Description:

The ECG is a well-established, clinically important, tool, and as such well understood. Nevertheless, updates of guidelines and reference values for ECG parameters seem to be never ending and modern methods in database management and machine learning give important new insights with respect to risk assessment and evaluation of therapies. In addition, ECG parameters may yield information about the respiratory, endocrine, homeostatic and nervous systems, especially in research settings. A basic knowledge of the ECG is thus relevant in fields different from cardiology, such as pain research, sports science and various clinical disciplines.

Topics:

  • ECG Basics
  • Arrhythmia
  • Ion channel defects and the ECG
  • Sympathetic and parasympathetic influences: Heart rate variability
  • Databases and epidemiologic research
  • Vectorcardiogram
  • Simulation of ion currents and ECGs

Literature: A list of literature will be made available in advance of the course.

Prerequisites: Basic knowledge of anatomy and physiology of the heart

Evaluation: Short project/assignment

Organisers: Associate professor Claus Graff, email: cgraff@hst.aau.dk, Professor Johannes J. Struijk, email: jjs@hst.aau.dk

Lecturers: Associate Professor Claus Graff, Professor Sam Riahi, Professor Johannes J. Struijk.

Guest lecturer: TBA

ECTS: 1.5

Dates: 20 and 21 October 2020 (8.15 - 14.15)

Place: Aalborg University, Fredrik Bajers Vej 7D, room D2-106

Deadline: 29 September 2020

Number of seats: 30

Important information concerning PhD courses: We have over some time experienced problems with no-show for both project and general courses. It has now reached a point where we are forced to take action. Therefore, the Doctoral School has decided to introduce a no-show fee of DKK 3,000 for each course where the student does not show up. Cancellations are accepted no later than 2 weeks before start of the course. Registered illness is of course an acceptable reason for not showing up on those days. Furthermore, all courses open for registration approximately four months before start. This can hopefully also provide new students a chance to register for courses during the year. We look forward to your registrations.

Description:

This course will be organized for the second time as a continuation of previous symposiums on physical activity and human performance. This PhD course will focus on performance and technology using an athletic approach. More specifically, aspects related to the assessment of human characteristics and capabilities, achievement of optimal efficiency, improvement of performance, comfort enhancement and safety will be addressed.

This PhD course will provide the audience relevant and recent research in sport sciences based on quantitative research addressing various form of physical activity. Internationally recognized speakers and speakers from Aalborg University will be invited. The addressed topics will include for instance: motor control, exercise physiology, biomechanics, ergonomics, and neuromechanics.

A special emphasis will be given on the speakers-student interaction. The detailed agenda of the course will be provided on the course web site. 

Literature: Relevant papers and book chapters will be announced shortly before the course.

Prerequisites: The students participating to this course should have basic knowledge on anatomy, physiology and methods to assess human performance by means of quantitative methods.

Evaluation: Evaluation will be announced at the course.

Organiser: Professor Pascal Madeleine, email: pm@hst.aau.dk

Co-organisers: Professor Michael Voigt and Professor Uwe G Kersting

Lecturers: Organisers, invited national and international speakers and speakers from the Dept. of Health Science and Technology and Aalborg University Hospital

ECTS: 1.0

Date: 28 & 29 May 2020 (8.15 - 16.15)

Place: Aalborg University, Fredrik Bajers Vej 7D, room D2-106

Deadline: 7 May 2020

Number of Seats: 30

Important information concerning PhD courses: We have over some time experienced problems with no-show for both project and general courses. It has now reached a point where we are forced to take action. Therefore, the Doctoral School has decided to introduce a no-show fee of DKK 3,000 for each course where the student does not show up. Cancellations are accepted no later than 2 weeks before start of the course. Registered illness is of course an acceptable reason for not showing up on those days. Furthermore, all courses open for registration approximately four months before start. This can hopefully also provide new students a chance to register for courses during the year. We look forward to your registrations.

Description:

This PhD course introduces the primary basic concepts of biological signal processing for scientists and students with no engineering background. The course presents the concepts with minimum use of mathematical formulations and more emphasis on visual illustrations. The idea is to present an intuitive approach to understanding the basics of signal processing and exemplify some practical applications of the concepts by which the readers achieve basic knowledge and skills in signal processing. Most of illustrations in the course have been created by computer programming in MATLAB; thus, the reader will learn the basics of using computers in signal processing applications.

The course will cover topics such as:

  • Signal characteristics in time and frequency domains
  • Power spectrum and its properties
  • Time-frequency representations
  • Filters in Frequency domain and spatial filters
  • Relevance of the signal processing theories in processing of biological signals such as electromyogram and electroencephalogram
  • Limitations of available solutions
  • Nonlinear analysis of signals 

Literature: An introduction to signal processing for non-engineers / by Afshin Samani. First edition. | Boca Raton, FL : CRC Press/Taylor & Francis Group, 2019.

Selected papers and book chapters will be provided shortly before the course.

Prerequisites: The students participating should have basic knowledge about the physiological mechanisms underlying at least a type of biological signals.

Evaluation: The course will be evaluated through the participants’ presentation of the relevance of signal processing theories in their projects and active discussion of in groups would be expected.

Organiser: Associate Professor Afshin Samani, email: afsamani@hst.aau.dk

Lecturers: Associate Professor Afshin Samani and invited speakers

ECTS: 1.5

Dates: 2 and 3 April 2020 (9.00 - 15.00)

Place: Aalborg University, Niels Jernes Vej 14, room 14/4-117

Deadline: 12 March 2020

Number of Seats: 30

Important information concerning PhD courses: We have over some time experienced problems with no-show for both project and general courses. It has now reached a point where we are forced to take action. Therefore, the Doctoral School has decided to introduce a no-show fee of DKK 3,000 for each course where the student does not show up. Cancellations are accepted no later than 2 weeks before start of the course. Registered illness is of course an acceptable reason for not showing up on those days. Furthermore, all courses open for registration approximately four months before start. This can hopefully also provide new students a chance to register for courses during the year. We look forward to your registrations.

Description:

The course will cover the practical assessment of neuromuscular function and adaptations following training or rehabilitation. The topics covered include assessment of plasticity in cortical pathways by measures such as I-wave facilitation, motor evoked potential changes as well as cortical inhibition and facilitation using transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), assessment of cortical plasticity using electroencephalography (EEG), assessment of spinal plasticity by measures of the stretch reflex as well as more advanced techniques (reciprocal inhibition, monosynaptic Ia excitation and post-activation depression). The course will be conducted through a combination of lectures as well as laboratory work with a greater emphasis on the laboratory component.

Literature: Selected papers and book chapters will be provided to the participants shortly before the course.

Prerequisites: A basic background within Anatomy, Physiology and Motor Control is desirable.

Evaluation: Laboratory assignments will be completed throughout the course.

Organisers: Associate Professor Anderson Oliveira, Aalborg University, email: oliveira@mp.aau.dkAssociate Professor Andrew J.T. Stevenson, email: ajts@hst.aau.dk

Lecturers: Associate Professor Andrew J.T. Stevenson and Associate Professor Anderson Oliveira

ECTS: 1.5

Dates: 2, 9, 23 October 2020 (8.15 - 16.15)

Place: Aalborg University, Fredrik Bajers Vej 7D, room D2-106

Deadline: 11 September 2020

Number of seats: 30

Important information concerning PhD courses: We have over some time experienced problems with no-show for both project and general courses. It has now reached a point where we are forced to take action. Therefore, the Doctoral School has decided to introduce a no-show fee of DKK 3,000 for each course where the student does not show up. Cancellations are accepted no later than 2 weeks before start of the course. Registered illness is of course an acceptable reason for not showing up on those days. Furthermore, all courses open for registration approximately four months before start. This can hopefully also provide new students a chance to register for courses during the year. We look forward to your registrations.

Welcome to NEUROMODULATION – EMERGING TECHNIQUES

Description:

This PhD course is intended to provide the students with principles of neuromodulation, non-invasive and invasive, used in various applications such as replacing impaired neural functions, functional testing of various neural circuits, and various forms for therapies. The course in intended to provides as well a mini hands-on workshop besides lectures, allowing the student to interact with various forms of temporal patterns for surface electrical stimulation for sensory input, examining the effects of various parameters of the stimulus.

  • deep brain stimulation for Parkinson,
  • spinal cord and dorsal root ganglion stimulation for neuropathic pain,
  • vagus nerve stimulation for tinnitus,
  • cochlear stimulation

Literature: Knotkova, Helena, Rasche, Dirk Textbook of Neuromodulation Principles, Methods and Clinical Applications

Selected papers will be indicated before the course.

Prerequisites: Basic understanding of anatomy and physiology, principles of stimulation techniques.

Evaluation: Oral evaluation based on agreed topic.

Organiser: Associate Professor Romulus Lontis, email: lontis@hst.aau.dk

Lecturer: Associate Professor Romulus Lontis

ECTS: 1.5

Dates: 6 and 20 November 2020 (8.15 - 14.15)

Place: Aalborg University, Fredrik Bajers Vej 7D, room D2-106

Deadline: 16 October 2020

Number of Seats: 30

Important information concerning PhD courses: We have over some time experienced problems with no-show for both project and general courses. It has now reached a point where we are forced to take action. Therefore, the Doctoral School has decided to introduce a no-show fee of DKK 3,000 for each course where the student does not show up. Cancellations are accepted no later than 2 weeks before start of the course. Registered illness is of course an acceptable reason for not showing up on those days. Furthermore, all courses open for registration approximately four months before start. This can hopefully also provide new students a chance to register for courses during the year. We look forward to your registrations.

Welcome to HOW TO IMPROVE ASSESSMENT OF NERVE FIBER DAMAGE IN DIABETES? - AN INTERDISCIPLINARY, HANDS-ON, COLLABORATIVE WORKSHOP

Please register here

Description:

The most common complication of diabetes is diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN), affecting up to half of the patients. The hallmark is a progressive loss of peripheral nerve axons, resulting in decreased sensation, pain, and ultimately, complete loss of sensation. There are currently no obvious disease modifying treatments available for diabetic neuropathy other than glycemic control and symptomatic treatment of pain. Indeed, pain is a major problem in DPN, but current treatment is often insufficient, and consequently less than two-thirds of the patients are adequately treated. While the phenotypes of DPN are well-described, many questions remain unanswered in terms of mechanisms and pathophysiology. However, DPN has up to this point been a neglected problem. Recently, both diabetologists and the research community have seen and recognized the urgent need to address this worldwide problem. Therefore, there has been increased focus on the fundamental aspects related to diabetic neuropathy.

There exist multiple ways to assess the function and pathology of the nerve fibers that are affected in DPN and give rise to the aforementioned symptoms. The most commonly used tests include nerve conduction studies to test the function of the large nerve fibers, skin biopsy to assess structural damage of the small nerve fibers and quantitative sensory testing to test the function of the large and small nerve fibers. Additionally, there are other functional and structural tests available that are used for research purposes (e.g. corneal confocal microscopy, evoked potentials and thermal grill). These tests may have several important functions: i) have important diagnostic purposes, ii) provide information about which treatment approaches are relevant, iii) hold the potential to explain why some diabetic patients develop DPN, and iv) may enable us to identify new treatment targets. Especially the last two functions need more research if we wish to unleash their full potential and to better understand the mechanisms behind DPN and provide mechanism-based treatment options for the patients. 

This joint workshop will address the state-of-art knowledge about small nerve fiber assessment and how they can contribute to our understanding of the mechanisms and pathophysiology of DPN. In addition to that, shared knowledge should and will help determine the direction of future research.

Learning goals: To present and demonstrate various ways to assess nerve fiber structure and function in patients with diabetes, beginning with a short presentation and followed by hands-on demonstration

To discuss strengths and weaknesses of each method, and to propose methods to be used in upcoming and future research projects

Program: Please click here to see the program 

Registration: Please register here

Organisers: Associate Professor Carsten Dahl Mørch, cdahl@hst.aau.dk, Associate Professor Páll Karlsson, Danish Pain Research Center and Core Center for Molecular Morphology Aarhus University Hospital

Lecturers: Several invited experts in the field of diabetic neuropathy

ECTS: 1.0

Dates: 28 February 2020

Place: Aalborg University, Niels Jernes Vej 14, room 4-111

Deadline: 12 February 2020

Number of seats: 30

The workshop is sponsored by the Danish Diabetes Academy and CNAP.

Important information concerning PhD courses: We have over some time experienced problems with no-show for both project and general courses. It has now reached a point where we are forced to take action. Therefore, the Doctoral School has decided to introduce a no-show fee of DKK 3,000 for each course where the student does not show up. Cancellations are accepted no later than 2 weeks before start of the course. Registered illness is of course an acceptable reason for not showing up on those days. Furthermore, all courses open for registration approximately four months before start. This can hopefully also provide new students a chance to register for courses during the year. We look forward to your registrations.

 

Welcome to DIABETES RESEARCH SYMPOSIUM

Discription:

This symposium about diabetes research in North Denmark is a 2-day course with the first day focusing on research and the second day on clinical practice. Both days will include lectures by current experts of the fields. Moreover, the first day will include a poster session, where the students are presenting their current preliminary results and receive feedback from the senior researchers providing the lectures. Second day include a networking lunch to strengthen future diabetes research in North Denmark.

The content of the course is:

  • Antidiabetic Treatments
  • Diabetes Technologies
  • Diabetes and Eye Diseases
  • The Diabetic Foot
  • Gastroenterology in Diabetes

Literature: Links to scientific articles distributed in Moodle by the different lecturers in due time before the course.

Prerequisites: Approved abstract of international research quality.

Evaluation: Justification of the ECTS points include that it is a requirement that the student creates and submits an abstract of international research quality, prepare a poster for the symposium and present the poster at the poster session. Furthermore, scientific articles are pre-read for the course.

Abstract Submission & Poster Presentation Session - PhD Students

Please submit your abstract no later than 30 April 2020 to mhj@hst.aau.dk and cdahl@hst.aau.dk. The abstract should follow these guidelines:

The abstract should be prepared in a Word document and should not exceed 250 words. The abstract format should include four sections: Objective (the purpose or hypothesis of study), Research Design and Methods (the basic design, setting, number of participants and selection criteria, treatment or intervention, and methods of assessment), Results (significant data found), and Conclusions (the validity, limitations, and clinical applicability of the study and its results).

Abstracts will not be published.

The poster should follow these guidelines:  Width 90 cm and length 150 cm. 

Poster presentation: The duration of the presentation will be approx. 10 minutes depending on the number of participants. Further information to follow before the symposium. 

Feedback on both abstract and poster will be given in connection with the poster presentation session on 27 May 2020.

Organisers: Associate Professor Carsten Dahl Mørch, email: cdahl@hst.aau.dk, Assistant Professor Morten Hasselstrøm Jensen, email: mhj@hst.aau.dk

Lecturers: Associate Professor Carsten Dahl Mørch, Assistant Professor Morten Hasselstrøm Jensen and others

Program:  See the program here

ECTS: 2.0

Dates: 26 and 27 May 2020 (9.00 - 16.00)

Place: Aalborg University, Niels Jernes Vej 14, auditorium 4-111

Deadline: 5 May 2020

Number of seats: 30

ECTS: 2.0

Important information concerning PhD courses: We have over some time experienced problems with no-show for both project and general courses. It has now reached a point where we are forced to take action. Therefore, the Doctoral School has decided to introduce a no-show fee of DKK 3,000 for each course where the student does not show up. Cancellations are accepted no later than 2 weeks before start of the course. Registered illness is of course an acceptable reason for not showing up on those days. Furthermore, all courses open for registration approximately four months before start. This can hopefully also provide new students a chance to register for courses during the year. We look forward to your registrations.

Welcome to BIOSTATISTICS I

Description: 

This is a basic course in biostatistics and it focuses on the application of biostatistics. Statistical methods in medicine, biology, and biomedical engineering are based on experimental designs that may differ from those treated in traditional statistics courses. Especially the design of experiments and the types of data obtained from these experiments are often very different. Problems with sampling, allocation, volunteers, placebo, cross-over designs, repeated measurements, etc. are typical for the biomedical field. Moreover, data widely deviating from normality are the rule, not the exception. This course will consist of two parts: (i) a review of some well-known and widely used parametric and non-parametric methods and discussions of basic designs of experimental studies, (ii) application of the statistical methods, and (iii) developing a statistical analysis plan (SAP) for your research project.

The learning goals for Biostatistics 1 are:

  1. Write a draft of a SAP for your own research project.
  2. The ability to understand the assumptions and perform the following statistical tests:

  • Descriptive statistics
  • Probability distributions
  • Estimation
  • Hypothesis testing - parametric tests
  • Non-parametric tests
  • One-way ANOVA
  • Cross-tabulations
  • Regression and correlation

For the evaluation of Biostatistics 1, we will attempt to get as close to your projects as possible. We hope that you will be able to use some of the statistical tools from the course and use them in the context of your own project. You will hand in a draft of your SAP before the last lecture, you will review your fellow participants’ SAPs and you will present your SAP on the last day of the course.

Prerequisites: Basic knowledge of statistical software Stata or SPSS. We recommend that you bring your own laptop.

Literature: B. Kirkwood, J. Sterne, “Essential medical statistics”. Plus handouts.

Organiser: Associate Professor Carsten Dahl Mørch, email: cdahl@hst.aau.dk

Lecturers: Sinead Holden, Michael Skovdal Rathleff, and Associate Professor Carsten Dahl Mørch

ECTS: 3.5

Dates: 6, 12, 17, 27 March, 14, 20 April & 4 May 2020 (all days 8.15 - 12.00, except 17 March and 4 May 12.30-16.15)

Place: Aalborg University, Niels Jernes Vej 14, room 4-117

Deadline: 14 February 2020

Important information concerning PhD courses: We have over some time experienced problems with no-show for both project and general courses. It has now reached a point where we are forced to take action. Therefore, the Doctoral School has decided to introduce a no-show fee of DKK 3,000 for each course where the student does not show up. Cancellations are accepted no later than 2 weeks before start of the course. Registered illness is of course an acceptable reason for not showing up on those days. Furthermore, all courses open for registration approximately four months before start. This can hopefully also provide new students a chance to register for courses during the year. We look forward to your registrations.



Description:

This course is targeted PhD students who are interested in developing their competencies as teachers and supervisors. To develop ones professional competencies in teaching and learning is an increasingly important part of university employment as is the ability to communicate to varied audiences in the private and public sector in general.

The aim of the course therefore is to provide insights into learning theories and pedagogical positions and place these into a context of health science educations. It is central to the course to create awareness of the close connections between the work as a researcher and the tasks as educators, which is at the heart of university education. Themes addressed in the course include among others:

  • Perspectives on teaching and learning in higher and health science education
  • Defining and assuming the various roles of educators in the health sciences
  • Connecting curriculum to learning activities
  • Being the ‘new’ teacher in a busy workplace

The course is organised in two full day sessions. Each session consists of lectures and workshop activities. The lectures will be supplemented by literature, and will cover both introductory material as well as selected in-depth analyses. In the workshop, the participants will have the opportunity to work together with on designated activities generating reflection and insight into the pedagogic of higher education and the teaching practices in the health sciences. We aim to create a learning space with active participation. 

There will be a focus on the participants’ research fields, so that the pedagogical perspectives are made relevant for these fields and for the educational programs and practises within Department of Health Science and Technology and Department of Clinical Medicine.  

Literature: Relevant papers and book chapters will be made available prior to each session.

Prerequisites: An interest in teaching and willingness to engage actively in the course

Evaluation: PhD students are expected to be active during the sessions, and at the end of the course they will hand in a written assignment (4-5 pages) demonstrating a thoughtful and theoretically warranted reflection on their roles as educators.

Organisers: Associate Professor Diana Stentoft, email: stentoft@hst.aau.dk, Associate Professor Patrik Kjærsdam Telléus, email: pkt@hst.aau.dk

Lecturers: Organisers

ECTS: 2.0

Dates: 26 February, 11 and 20 March 2020 (26.02: 8.15 – 16.15; 11.03: 12.30 - 16.15; 20.03: 8.15 - 16.15)

Place: Aalborg Universit, Niels Jernes Vej 14, room 4-117

Deadline: 10 February 2020

Language: Danish or English depending on participant preferences

Number of seats: 30

Important information concerning PhD courses: We have over some time experienced problems with no-show for both project and general courses. It has now reached a point where we are forced to take action. Therefore, the Doctoral School has decided to introduce a no-show fee of DKK 5,000 for each course where the student does not show up. Cancellations are accepted no later than 2 weeks before start of the course. Registered illness is of course an acceptable reason for not showing up on those days. Furthermore, all courses open for registration approximately four months before start. This can hopefully also provide new students a chance to register for courses during the year. We look forward to your registrations.

 

Description: 

When presenting, the dull, text-filled slide approach is common and normal, but it is not an effective approach for communicating scientific knowledge. To date, the design and delivery of scientific presentations are reflecting what has been done in the past.  The skills necessary to be an effective communicator today are different. A higher degree of visual literacy, more emphasis on the message, and better understanding of the power of simplicity can dramatically improve how a presentation is received and ultimately remembered.

The objective of this course is to equip PhD students with modern presentation skills and techniques that enhance their ability to communicate scientific content to laymen, academic, and industry-based audiences. 

The course will consist of 1) an introduction to presentation design principles, 2) an introduction to tools and resources for presentation design and development 3) workshop sessions on design and redesign of presentation material, 4) introduction of how design influences delivery (speaking) principles 

Literature/Requirements: Participants will need to bring a PC laptop with Power Point or similar to the workshop sessions. 

Prerequisites: It is important that PhD students have some presentation experience, and they should have been enrolled for at least 8 months into the doctoral school before participating in the course OR have multiple experiences presenting at scientific conferences.

Evaluation:Oral presentation and completion of workshop exercises. You must attend the first lecture and attend two out of the three lectures, as well as complete the assignment to receive a credit for this course.

Organiser: Associate Professor Shellie Boudreau, email: sboudreau@hst.aau.dk

Lecturer: Associate Professor Shellie Boudreau, Aalborg University

ECTS: 1.0

Dates: 9, 10 and 17 March 2020 (09.03: 8.15-12.00; 10.03 and 17.03: 8.15-10.00)

Place: Aalborg University, Fredrik Bajers Vej 7D, room D2-106

Deadline: 17 February 2020

Max. number of seats: 12

Important information concerning PhD courses: We have over some time experienced problems with no-show for both project and general courses. It has now reached a point where we are forced to take action. Therefore, the Doctoral School has decided to introduce a no-show fee of DKK 3,000 for each course where the student does not show up. Cancellations are accepted no later than 2 weeks before start of the course. Registered illness is of course an acceptable reason for not showing up on those days. Furthermore, all courses open for registration approximately four months before start. This can hopefully also provide new students a chance to register for courses during the year. We look forward to your registrations.

Description: 

The neurophysiology of movement and neural rehabilitation of movement are rapidly developing research areas. The course focuses on neural engineering solutions for rehabilitation of people suffering from damage to or disease in the central or peripheral nervous system.

This course is organized annually and has a focus on disseminating the most relevant and recent achievements within the area. The course will include a series of internationally recognized speakers and a series of speakers from Aalborg University that are experts within the field. There will be a strong emphasis on providing time for interaction between the speakers and participants. The detailed agenda of the course will be provided on the course web site.

Main topics can include animal or human models, neurophysiology of movement, neuroplasticity, neuromodulation, rehabilitation technologies, assessment technologies (e.g. fMRI, TMS, electrophysiology) and other timely topics.

Literature: Relevant papers and book chapters related to the specific talks will be announced shortly before the course.

Prerequisites: The course targets PhD students working within the areas of motor control, neural rehabilitation engineering or other students with interests in this research area. The course is repeated every year with a different focus, thus participation to the previous edition does not preclude participation in this edition.

Evaluation: The students have to be present at the symposium. A poster session will be organized during the symposium, and the students should bring a poster on their own work (it can be a poster presented at another conference or meeting).

Fee: A fee of DKK 500 will be charged for catering.

Organisers: Professor Ole Kæseler Andersen, email: oka@hst.aau.dk, Professor Winnie Jensen, email:  wj@hst.aau.dk

Lecturers: Organisers, invited lecturers and lecturers from HST

ECTS: 1.0

Dates: 7 and 8 October 2020 (9.00 - 16.00)

Place: Aalborg University, Niels Jernes Vej, room 4-111

Deadline: 16 September 2020

Number of seats: 30

Important information concerning PhD courses: We have over some time experienced problems with no-show for both project and general courses. It has now reached a point where we are forced to take action. Therefore, the Doctoral School has decided to introduce a no-show fee of DKK 3,000 for each course where the student does not show up. Cancellations are accepted no later than 2 weeks before start of the course. Registered illness is of course an acceptable reason for not showing up on those days. Furthermore, all courses open for registration approximately four months before start. This can hopefully also provide new students a chance to register for courses during the year. We look forward to your registrations.

Description: 

Skeletal muscle comprises up to 40% of the adult human body weight, playing a key role in everyday activities such as locomotion, maintenance of posture and breathing. In response to minor injuries, skeletal muscles have an extraordinary regeneration capacity, which relies on the resident muscle stem cells known as satellite cells. However, a variety of conditions override the muscle intrinsic regeneration capacity and are associated with an incomplete functional recovery. Muscle injury is a major concern in traumatology and sports medicine, where rapid and effective healing is desirable. Current research seeks to gain a better understanding of mechanisms behind skeletal muscle growth, maintenance and regeneration, toward the development of meaningful clinical interventions. The course aims to present and discuss current topics in skeletal muscle research, covering molecular, cellular, and anatomical aspects. The program includes various methodologies currently used to investigate the responses of skeletal muscle to physical strains, ranging from cells and animal models to human studies. The topics of the course include, but are not limited to: 

  • Satellite cells and adult myogenesis
  • In vitro models of myogenesis
  • Mechano-transduction in skeletal muscle
  • Muscle regeneration in animal models
  • Mechanisms of exercise-induced skeletal muscle injury
  • Age-dependent changes in muscle function
  • Therapies for muscle regeneration
  • Methods and biomarkers for the assessment of muscle function in health and disease

Literature: Selected papers and book chapters will be announced shortly before the course.

Prerequisites: Basic knowledge of mammalian cell biology and human physiology

Evaluation: Delivery of an oral presentation and a written essay in a selected topic.

Organiser: Associate Professor Cristian Pablo Pennisi, email: cpennisi@hst.aau.dk

Lecturers: Associate Professor, Cristian Pablo Pennisi, Associate Professor Ryan Godsk Larsen and Postdoc Hiva Alipour. Professor Aase Handberg, and invited external lecturers

ECTS: 1.5

Dates: 2 and 3 November 2020 (8.15 - 14.15)

Place: Aalborg University, Fredrik Bajers Vej 7D, room D2-106

Deadline: 12 October 2020

Max. No. of participants: 16

Important information concerning PhD courses: We have over some time experienced problems with no-show for both project and general courses. It has now reached a point where we are forced to take action. Therefore, the Doctoral School has decided to introduce a no-show fee of DKK 3,000 for each course where the student does not show up. Cancellations are accepted no later than 2 weeks before start of the course. Registered illness is of course an acceptable reason for not showing up on those days. Furthermore, all courses open for registration approximately four months before start. This can hopefully also provide new students a chance to register for courses during the year. We look forward to your registrations.

  • Description: 

    Controlling human movement involves intrinsic neurophysiological features that modulate motor actions. Motor actions occur predominantly against some type of mechanical resistance and/or environmental interaction. It has become evident that a true understanding of human movement requires one to gather knowledge in human neurophysiology and neuromechanics.

    Therefore, this course has two aims: 1) to provide a basic background on movement neurophysiology and neuromechanics, integrating the two areas to offer a global understanding on movement control, and 2) to provide students with the latest trends in research on neural control of movements, both in mechanical and physiological terms. In this course, we will offer the possibility to integrate the understanding of movement execution with its neural foundation, to determine the timing and weighting of commands in the central and peripheral nervous system, and how mechanical constraints affect movement control.

    Topics covered in the course will include basic physiological and mechanical factors of movement control; novel methods in neurophysiology and neuromechanics research; control of human locomotion and cyclical movements; control of upper limb movements (reaching and grasping), and perspectives in neurorehabilitation. Students will have the opportunity to reflect on these research trends and discuss the potential use of neurophysiological measurements in their own PhD studies by performing presentations during the course.

  • Literature: Selected papers and book chapters will be provided to the participants shortly before the course.

  • Prerequisites: A basic background within anatomy and physiology is desirable. Knowledge in movement biomechanics is desirable, but not necessary.

  • Evaluation: Students will be asked to make a presentation integrating the content from lectures to solving aspects of their PhD projects. The three lecturers will be present during the presentations, maximizing the possibility of providing useful feedback to the students.

  • Organizer: Associate Professor Anderson Oliveira, email: oliveira@mp.aau.dk, Associate Professor Andrew J.T. Stevenson, email: ajts@hst.aau.dkAssociate Professor Strahinja Dosen: e-mail: sdosen@hst.aau.dk
  • Lecturers: Anderson Oliveira, Andrew J.T. Stevenson, Strahinja Dosen and other local and external speakers

  • ECTS: 2.0

  • Dates: 12, 25 May and 9 June 2020 (8.15 - 12.00)

  • Place: Aalborg University, Fredrik Bajers Vej 7E, room E3-109

  • Deadline: 21 April 2020

  • Number of seats: 30

    Important information concerning PhD courses: We have over some time experienced problems with no-show for both project and general courses. It has now reached a point where we are forced to take action. Therefore, the Doctoral School has decided to introduce a no-show fee of DKK 3,000 for each course where the student does not show up. Cancellations are accepted no later than 2 weeks before start of the course. Registered illness is of course an acceptable reason for not showing up on those days. Furthermore, all courses open for registration approximately four months before start. This can hopefully also provide new students a chance to register for courses during the year. We look forward to your registrations.
  • Description: 

    Modelling of physiological processes and tissues is a valuable tool in both research and industry. Modeling can give insights that can be difficult or even impossible to obtain using experimental methods. Such modelling can lead to a better understanding of physiological processes and, furthermore, it can help reducing the amount of experimental work needed in both research and development. As computational power is increasing, more advanced models can be solved using standard laptop computers. This allows more refined investigations as well as optimizing existing models. When using models, it is essential to ensure validity of the models, either by experimental validation or comparison to reference values and data. Furthermore, when doing physiological modelling there is a number of potential pitfalls, which have to be taken into account, considering for example selection and implementation of the appropriate numerical minimization algorithm.

    This course introduces a number of generic modelling principles and addresses specific methods, ranging from identifiability analysis, model complexity, and parameter estimation to numerical solutions, which may be applied in your own research. The course also focuses on ensuring validity of the applied models. Through this course you will be introduced to and gain experience using the finite element method, which can be used to model a large variety of different physics such as force/strength/strain/displacement; heat transfer; electric transfer. You will gain knowledge and experience using compartmental models, typically used to study kinetics of materials in physiological systems from a whole-body perspective to the cellular level. Finally, you will gain insight into modelling excitable membranes, e.g. the modelling of the excitable membrane found in nerves, muscle fibers and cardiac tissue.

     Contents of lectures:

    • Introduction to modelling
    • Ensuring validity of the model
    • Finite element modelling
    • Compartment modelling
    • Modelling of excitable membranes


  • Organizer:

    Associate Professor Steffen Frahm, email: ksf@hst.aau.dk 

  • Lecturers:

    Associate Professor Steffen Frahm, Associate Professor Lars Pilegaard, Associate Professor Carsten Dahl Mørch, Professor Johannes Struijk, Postdoc Jenny Tigerholm, and invited lectures

  • ECTS: 2.0

  • Dates: 21, 28 September, 5, 12 and 19 October 2020 (8.15-12.00)

  • Place: Aalborg University, Fredrik Bajers Vej 7D, room D2-106

  • Deadline: 31 August 2020

  • Number of seats: 30

  • Literature

    Notes, literature and exercise instruction will be distributed at the course

  • Prerequisites

    None

  • Evaluation

    Evaluation by written report. Passed/fail.

    Important information concerning PhD courses: We have over some time experienced problems with no-show for both project and general courses. It has now reached a point where we are forced to take action. Therefore, the Doctoral School has decided to introduce a no-show fee of DKK 3,000 for each course where the student does not show up. Cancellations are accepted no later than 2 weeks before start of the course. Registered illness is of course an acceptable reason for not showing up on those days. Furthermore, all courses open for registration approximately four months before start. This can hopefully also provide new students a chance to register for courses during the year. We look forward to your registrations.