Welcome to Institutions and Public Regulation - Options for Planning and Managing Technological Innovation for Smart Energy Systems

Description: A “business-as-usual” energy scenario may be changed into a scenario based on renewable energy and flexibility. Going towards 100% renewable energy systems requires Smart energy systems. But what are the demands of institutions, organisations, and public regulation on the technological trajectory of this change?

The aim of this course is to enable the PhD researcher to analyse the interplay between technological innovation and the institutional/regulatory framework in which it is embedded. The PhD course focuses on the energy sector, but its content is also applicable to other institutional and regulatory frameworks where radical technological changes are investigated.

The objective is for you to use the content as an inspiration for an article or for your dissertation.

The course enables you to use cases for examining institutions and public regulation and raises an awareness of different innovation paths. Initially, you will be introduced to theories of markets, state, public regulation, and innovation, and to methodologies to research the mechanisms within these areas. Cases are presented which may illustrate that technological trajectories are closely linked to different institutional and regulatory models and actors.

Potential case themes include: Privatisation and liberalisation programmes, public-private partnerships, EU renewable energy policy, transportation policy, CO2 trading schemes, green certificates, bottom-up and top-down technological innovation, strategic energy planning and other.

Organizers: Brian Vad Mathiesen bvm@plan.aau.dk

Lecturers: Professor Brian Vad Mathiesen, Frede Hvelplund, Assistant Professor Søren Djørup, Associate Professor Karl Sperling and two external guest lecturers

ECTS: 2,5

Time: 1-3 December 2020

Place: AAU CPH, A. C. Meyers Vænge 15

City: 2450 Copenhagen

Number of seats: 40

Deadline: 10 November 2020

Important information concerning PhD courses: We have over some time experienced problems with no-show for both project and general courses. It has now reached a point where we are forced to take action. Therefore, the Doctoral School has decided to introduce a no-show fee of DKK 3,000 for each course where the student does not show up. Cancellations are accepted no later than 2 weeks before start of the course. Registered illness is of course an acceptable reason for not showing up on those days. Furthermore, all courses open for registration approximately three months before start. This can hopefully also provide new students a chance to register for courses during the year. We look forward to your registrations.



Description: 
It is increasingly acknowledged that the linear 'take-make-dispose' economic model is reaching its limits, and initiatives to develop alternative economic models are emerging. Circular economy is currently getting a lot of attention, because it promises an industrial system that is restorative by design. Both businesses and cities are developing circular economy strategies.

However, circular economy is not without shortcomings as strategy for sustainable development. It is risky promoting a circular economy, where focus merely is on closing existing material flows and not trying to understand the dynamics of the present linear economy by questioning why we produce what, the challenge to closing material flows from the globalized, outsourced cheap production, and when and why products lose value to their users and become waste.
The course introduces potentials and challenges to circular economy from a business perspective and from an urban perspective. Theoretically, the course integrates theories about product chains, value chains, social practices, user-oriented innovation and governance.

Three types of re-design processes are discussed, which are necessary to consider when developing circular economy business models within specific institutional and regulatory contexts: 1) re-designs of products and services based on considerations about necessary changes in roles of products, users, service, infrastructure, etc. 2) re-designing value chains both up-stream and down-stream and 3) internal organizational redesign of the business organization in order to integrate environmental concerns in product and strategy development.

From an urban perspective, different roles in developing and supporting circular economy are introduced: 1) Public planning, 2) Public infrastructures, 3) Public procurement, 4) Public building and construction, 5) Local business development.

Organiser/s: Arne Remmen and Michael Søgaard Jørgensen
Lecturer(s): Arne Remmen, AAU; Michael Søgaard Jørgensen, AAU
ECTS for students: 5.0
Time: November 18-20
Place: Aalborg University; Aalborg or Copenhagen campus
Deadline for registration: October 26
Max. no. of participants: 25
Course shared with: Section B

Important information concerning PhD courses: We have over some time experienced problems with no-show for both project and general courses. It has now reached a point where we are forced to take action. Therefore, the Doctoral School has decided to introduce a no-show fee of DKK 3,000 for each course where the student does not show up. Cancellations are accepted no later than 2 weeks before start of the course. Registered illness is of course an acceptable reason for not showing up on those days. Furthermore, all courses open for registration approximately four months before start. This can hopefully also provide new students a chance to register for courses during the year. We look forward to your registrations.

Description:
During this course, students will develop a thorough understanding of the state of the art in Marine Governance and Maritime Spatial Planning (MSP). Students will be introduced to current issues and debates in marine governance and MSP that are discussed in social scientific literature, such as regionalization, Authority at sea, governing new economic activities in weak institutional settings (such as deep-sea mining and the Arctic), power, equity and participation.

Prerequisites: An approved PhD proposal by a research school.

Learning objectives:
After having completed the course successfully, students are expected to:
1. have a thorough understanding of current influential theories and themes within marine governance and Maritime Spatial Planning;
2. apply the key concepts developed within theories on policy analysis and governance in the domain of Marine Governance and Maritime Spatial Planning;
3. analyze and evaluate contemporary problems, developments and issues in marine governance and MSP practices;
4. critically assess the application of the theories and themes of this course in marine governance and MSP practices.

Teaching methods:
This course consists of a mix of lectures, seminars and workshops. In the lectures, theories and concepts will be introduced and explained. During the workshops, participants present their own work and one of the other participants will give a review of the paper. During the seminar, students shall reflect on the lectures, the literature and the presentations.

Criteria for assessment: 
Before the course, the students write a paper/essay of 10 pages. The paper will be send to one of the other participants for peer review 1 month before the course. During the course, each of the students presents his/her paper, followed by the peer review. Active participation during the seminar is required.

Suggested literature (will be updated later):
Ardron, Jeff A. (2018), Transparency in the operations of the International Seabed Authority. An initial assessment. Marine Policy. 95 (2018), pp. 324-331
Arts, Bas and Jan van Tatenhove (2005), Policy and Power. A Conceptual framework between the 'old' and 'new' policy idioms, Policy Sciences 37 (3-4), pp 339-356
Bailey, M., Bush, S. R., Miller, A., & Kochen, M. (2016). The role of traceability in transforming seafood governance in the global South. Current Opinion in Environmental Sustainability, 18, 25-32.
Dreyer, Marion, Magnus Boström & Anna Maria Jönsson (2014), Participatory Deliberation, Risk Governance and Management of the Marine Region in the European Union. Journal of Environmental Policy & Planning. 16:4, 497-515
Flannery, W., Ellis, G., Nursey-Bray, M., van Tatenhove, J. P. M., Kelly, C., Coffen-Smout, S., ... O'Hagan, A. M. (2016). Exploring the winners and losers of marine environmental governance/Marine spatial planning: Cui bono ?/"More than fishy business": epistemology, integration and conflict in marine spatial planning/Marine spatial planning: power and scaping/Surely not all. Planning Theory & Practice, 17(1), 121–151.
Smits, C.C.A.; Tatenhove, J. van; Leeuwen, J. van (2014), Authority in Arctic governance: changing spheres of authority in Greenlandic offshore oil and gas developments, International Environmental Agreements: Politics, Law and Economics 14(4), p.329-348
Van Tatenhove, Jan (2016), The Environmental State at Sea, Environmental Politics, 25 (1), pp. 160-179
Van Tatenhove, Jan P.M. (2017), Transboundary Marine Spatial Planning: a reflexive marine governance experiment? Journal of Environmental Policy and Planning. 19(6), 783-794

Organiser/s: Jan van Tatenhove
Lecturer(s): Jan van Tatenhove
ECTS for students: 3.0
Time: Preliminary dates are 9-11 December
Place: Aalborg
Deadline for registration: 3 weeks prior to course starts
Max. no. of participants: 15

Important information concerning PhD courses: We have over some time experienced problems with no-show for both project and general courses. It has now reached a point where we are forced to take action. Therefore, the Doctoral School has decided to introduce a no-show fee of DKK 3,000 for each course where the student does not show up. Cancellations are accepted no later than 2 weeks before start of the course. Registered illness is of course an acceptable reason for not showing up on those days. Furthermore, all courses open for registration approximately four months before start. This can hopefully also provide new students a chance to register for courses during the year. We look forward to your registrations.

Topic:
This course is for PhD students who research technology in action, i.e. students that work with finding approaches for qualitative research of practices around technology and theories that can support their investigation of technology in practice. With an increase in interdisciplinary research of technological development and uses, theories and methods are needed that can work at the intersection between the technical and the human practice. At this course we will reflect on theoretical and methodological approaches for investigating technology in action.

Learning objectives:

  • identify methodological and theoretical dilemmas and challenges regarding research of technology in action
  • make qualified reflections regarding the unit of analysis for research of technology in action
  • choose theories and methods relevant for researching technology in action
  • present challenges and dilemmas in own Ph.D. project that regard research of technology in action

Teaching methods:

The course alternate between lectures and exercises. At the course students, together with lecturers, explore theory focused on understanding materiality. And students explore qualitative methods focused on researching technological practices including ethnographic and participatory methods.

Day 1

Day 2

Day 3

Challenges thinking   with theory in research of technology in practice

Dilemmas using   methods in research of technology in practice

Presentations and   feedback

Examples and   dicsussions of socio-technical theory

Examples and   discussion of techo-anthropological methods

 

 

The participants are asked to submit a 2 page long abstract that describe their project, and state what theoretical and methodological challenges they encounter in their project in relation to studying, intervening or designing technologies through the use of qualitative methodologies

In preparation for the course participants are kindly asked to do a short (10 min) presentation of dilemmas and challenges in their PhD project regarding research of technology in action.

 As conclusion of the course, the participants will write 2-4 pages about theories and methods for researching technology in action in their PhD research. The ambition is that these pages can form the basis for the students’ further writing of research papers and thesis.

Key literature:
Michael Pryke, Gillian rose & Sarah Whatmore: “Using Social Theory – Thinking through Research”. Sage, 2003.

Goodeve, Thyrza N. (2000). Diffraction as Critical Consciousness, in How Like a Leaf. NY Routledge. P. 101-108

Haraway, Donna () Situated knowledges: The Science Question in Feminism and the Priviledge of partial Perspective, in Haraway. Simians, Cyborgs and Women. The Reinvention of Nature. NY. Routledge. P149-182 

 Schneider, Joseph (2005). A Queer Familyof Companion Species: From Cyborgs to Dogs and Beyond. donna haraway. live theory. New York, continuum. P. 58-87

Susan Leigh Star: This is Not a Boundary Object: Reflections on the Origin of a Concept. Science, Technology & Human Values 35(5): 601-617.

Teun Suiderent-Jerak: “Situated Intervention: Sociological Experiments in Health Care”. MIT Press, 2015.

Joseph Dumit: “Writing the implosion: Teaching the World One Thing at a Time”. Cultural Anthropology 29(2): 344-362

Eva Brandt, Thomas Binder & Elizabeth Sanders: Tools and techniques – Ways to engage telling, making and enacting. In J. Simonsen & T. Robertson Routledge International Handbook of Participatory Design. Routledge, New York, 2013.

Anne Marie Kanstrup: “Living in the Lab: an analysis of the work in eight living laboratories set up in care homes for technology innovation. CoDesign 13(1): 49-64, 2017.

Organiser/s: Anne Marie Kanstrup (Dept. of Planning), Stine W. Adrian (Dept. of Learning)
Lecturer(s):

ECTS for students:
 
3.0

Time:
 16-18 November 2020
Place: AAU, 9000 Aalborg, Rendsburggade 14, room Rdb14 3.329 

Deadline for registration:
 1 November 2020

Max. no. of participants: 
25

Important information concerning PhD courses: We have over some time experienced problems with no-show for both project and general courses. It has now reached a point where we are forced to take action. Therefore, the Doctoral School has decided to introduce a no-show fee of DKK 3,000 for each course where the student does not show up. Cancellations are accepted no later than 2 weeks before start of the course. Registered illness is of course an acceptable reason for not showing up on those days. Furthermore, all courses open for registration approximately four months before start. This can hopefully also provide new students a chance to register for courses during the year. We look forward to your registrations

Topic, background and motivation for the course:
Composed of 17 goals and 169 indicators, the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) provide an overview of the UN’s major sustainability targets, to be achieved by 2030. The SDGs are becoming an integrative part of universities activities. It is expected that educational and research activities and outcomes integrate sustainability knowledge and competences aligned with the SDGs. To fulfil these expectations, students and academic staff need to develop a deeper understanding of SDGs in relation to their disciplinary fields, collaborate in multidisciplinary teams, have anticipatory and systems thinking skills, and be able to analyse and solve complex problems.

The overall aim of this course is for PhD students to develop a deeper understanding of SDGs by putting their own research in a broader context and understanding how it is aligned with the SDGs. Students are expected to move beyond their disciplinary boundaries, explore the different SDGs, their complexity, and relate them with their own research area and teaching activities. To do so, students will be introduced to literature, strategies and tools for a deeper understanding of SDGs, systematic problem analysis and solving processes, and they will revise and develop research proposals under the SDGs framework, including multidisciplinary collaboration.

Prerequisites: None

Learning objectives: By the end of the course, participants will be able to:

  • Demonstrate a deeper understanding of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs)
  • Contextualize their PhD projects in the SDGs framework
  • Use a systematic problem solving process to develop a research proposal in relation to a specific SDGs
  • Demonstrate collaborative research skills
  • Reflect on their own research practice and future perspectives
  • Provide peer-feedback

Teaching methods: The course employs several teaching methods, namely:

  • Self-study activities (individual assignment plus preparation for course sessions)
  • Small lectures and hands-on exercises (in the face to face course sessions)
  • Group work
  • Reflective team exercises on facilitation
  • Peer and written feedback

Criteria assessment:

Two assignments (i.e. one before the course starts and one during the course)

Active participation in the course sessions by carrying out exercises, contributing to group work and discussions, and providing constructive peer-feedback. 

Key literature:

  1. Kolmos, A., & de Graaff, E. (2014). Problem-Based and Project-Based Learning in Engineering Education: Merging Models. I A. Johri, & B. M. Olds (red.), Cambridge Handbook of Engineering Education Research (s. 141-161). Cambridge University Press. https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9781139013451.012
  • Holgaard, J. E., Guerra, A., Kolmos, A., & Petersen, L. S. (2017). Getting a hold on the problem in a problem-based learning environment. International Journal of Engineering Education, 33(3), 1070-1085.
  • Guerra, A. & Holgaard, J. E. (2019). Contextual Learning for Sustainability. I W. Leal Filho (red.), Encyclopedia of Sustainability in Higher Education Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-63951-2.
  • Turner, S. (2009). ASIT— a problem solving strategy for education and eco-friendly sustainable design. Int J Technol Des Educ, 19: 221. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10798-008-9080-6
  • United Nations. Sustainable Development Goals - About the Sustainable Development Goals. Available at: https://www.un.org/sustainabledevelopment/sustainable-development-goals/
  • UNESCO (2017). Education for Sustainable Development Goals Learning Objectives. UNESCO: Education Section, Available at: https://unesdoc.unesco.org/ark:/48223/pf0000247444
  • Creswell, J. (2014). Research Design: Qualitative, Quantitative, and Mixed Methods Approaches. SAGE Publications. Chap. 1, pp. 3-24.

Organizer: Aida Guerra

Lecturer(s): Aida Guerra (Aalborg University, Denmark) and Roger Hadgraft (University of Technology Sydney, Australia)

ECTS for the student: 2.0 

Tentative dates for course: 26-28 August 2020

Place: Rendsburggade 14, room Rdb14 3.329

Max no. of participants: 25

Deadline: 5 August 2020

Important information concerning PhD courses: We have over some time experienced problems with no-show for both project and general courses. It has now reached a point where we are forced to take action. Therefore, the Doctoral School has decided to introduce a no-show fee of DKK 3,000 for each course where the student does not show up. Cancellations are accepted no later than 2 weeks before start of the course. Registered illness is of course an acceptable reason for not showing up on those days. Furthermore, all courses open for registration approximately four months before start. This can hopefully also provide new students a chance to register for courses during the year. We look forward to your registrations.

 

Description:
While innovation and design are increasingly expected to answer to a broad variety of concerns and depending on the incorporation of knowledge from a diversity of sources, questions are raised as to what kinds of sources, and how they are incorporated in processes of design and innovation. As innovative challenges and conditions are changing with increasing pace these questions cannot just be solved through a singular choice of organization or established guidelines for selecting innovative ideas. Issues of how to stage the scene and circumstances and how to facilitate processes and the involvement of diverse actors in design as well as innovation have increasingly come into focus. Successful design and innovation are seen as the outcome of interactions within a broader network spanning across diverse organizational and societal boundaries and institutions. There is a need to address the design and navigation of new fora and spaces for development where existing frames of understandings may be challenged and new patterns for interactions emerge.

The course takes its departure in the well-described dilemmas between incremental but often path dependent innovative processes within established networks and the quest for the development and design of new innovative, disruptive or breakthrough ideas, product and services facilitated through new networked relations. A range of theories, cases and approaches concerned with the framing, designing and staging of innovative processes, from linear sequential models to complex, dynamic networks of innovation are treated and related to the current work of the participants.
During the course, a dialogue is created between the participants' projects and a diversity of understandings of the management and staging of design and innovation from organization, institutional theory and sociology of innovation. The idea is to direct inquiry and to stimulate theoretical insights and empirical approaches in the field of design and innovation. The course introduces concepts, which help render relevant phenomena and issues (relationships, dynamics, consequences) in the participants' projects visible and open to investigation, analysis as well as creative inquiry and exploration. This would, in turn, also help in delineating hypotheses of relevance to the investigation of innovative processes and their staging, and in proposing new directions for research in the field.
The program will cover the following themes:

• Challenges in management of innovation and the staging of design and innovative processes
• Innovation and design as heterogeneous processes of interaction involving actors, artefacts and knowledge
• Innovation and design as journeys characterized by uncertainty, ambiguity and complexity
• Innovation between rational analytical, interpretive and performative processes
• Innovation and design as exploitation and exploration
• Innovation as networking, brokering and collaboration in and between organizations
• From planning and calculation to social learning and translation of interests
• 'Co-creation' and 'path creation' as heterogeneous network building,
• Staging and navigation of temporary spaces for innovation across knowledge boundaries

Part 1 (Takes place at AAU Aalborg):
The first part of the course provides insight and understanding of how theory and practice in innovation and design as process has evolved. Insight is achieved through an overview of classics and recent movements in innovation research, a review of core innovation concepts and fields, as well as dialogue with industrial professionals from organizations leading innovation and design.

Part 2 (Takes place at AAU Copenhagen):
The second part provides insight in innovation and design and their staging based on the latest socio-material approaches to innovation and design. These traditions have emerged as an attempt to develop concepts and approaches enabling to search for and identify key processes and dynamics that might become central to the design of innovation and their staging.

Form:
The students should be familiar with basic understandings of innovative processes from innovation process theory and/or science and technology studies (the STS field) on an academic master level.
The program includes teacher presentations, student presentations, professional experiences and company talks as well as dialogue sessions where students will receive feedback on their presentations and projects from fellow students as well as teachers.
As a preparation for the first assembly, participants should prepare a presentation of a problem/solution from their research, which they want to analyze from an innovation process perspective. The presentation can focus on a case and/or a challenging perspective (oral supported with ppt) within the theme of the course (It is important to describe how innovation processes could be a relevant perspective for your activities in order to provide a professional and empirical background for your own reflexive learning.)
Between the first and second assembly participants write a 5-10 pages analysis bringing theory to bear on selected case material of their own choice. These assignments are basis for evaluation and approval of participation. In addition, participants will be asked to fill in a formal evaluation scheme.

Organiser/s: Associate Professor Søren Kerndrup, email: soeren@plan.aau.dk, and professor Christian Clausen, email: chcl@plan.aau.dk
Lecturer(s): Professor Peter Karnøe, AAU, BDO; associate professor Søren Kerndrup, AAU, SIP, asssociate professor Astrid Heidemann Lassen, AAU, CIP; Ole Tangsgaard, rinnovation Consult. associate professor Hanne Lindegaard, assistant professor Signe Pedersen and professor Christian Clausen, AAU, BDO.

ECTS for students: 5.0
Time and place Part 1: Aalborg on 24 and 25 September 2020, room TBA
Time and place Part 2: Copenhagen on 7-9 December 2020, room TBA

Deadline for registration: 1 September 2020
Max. no. of participants: 20
Course shared with: Offered by SIP and BDO in cooperation

Important information concerning PhD courses: We have over some time experienced problems with no-show for both project and general courses. It has now reached a point where we are forced to take action. Therefore, the Doctoral School has decided to introduce a no-show fee of DKK 3,000 for each course where the student does not show up. Cancellations are accepted no later than 2 weeks before start of the course. Registered illness is of course an acceptable reason for not showing up on those days. Furthermore, all courses open for registration approximately four months before start. This can hopefully also provide new students a chance to register for courses during the year. We look forward to your registrations.

Prices  

Attendee

Price*

PhD students affiliated to a Danish University

Free

PhD students not affiliated to a Danish   University

4.500 DKK     (600 EUR)

Academics   (e.g. postdoc and professors)

9.000   DKK (1200   EUR)

Professionals   (consultancy, industry, etc.)

18.000 DKK (2400 EUR)

* Prices do not cover meals or accommodation

Payment: Please find link to payment here  (payment no later than 25 April).

Organizers The course is organized by The Technical Doctoral School of IT and Design, Aalborg University and Danish Centre for Environmental Assessment (DCEA) www.DCEA.dk, in collaboration with the International Life Cycle Academy (ILCA) www.ILCA.es

Description The course aims at strengthening skills in life cycle inventory analysis. The course targets the development of advanced competences in LCA by applying the problem based-learning (PBL) teaching model that focuses on learning by doing and reflection. The course activities will include intensive group work, problem defining and solving applied to real-word cases, practical exercises, and discussion sessions or workshops. The target audience of the course is academics (PhDs, postdoc, other) or professionals who already have basic experience with LCA and intend to bring their LCA competences to an advanced level. Basic experience means for example having carried out simple LCAs before or having elementary knowledge of LCA theory. The course content is organized in three modules (main teacher in parenthesis).

Module 1. Intro to advanced LCA (Massimo Pizzol) In this hands-on module students will learn how to use the software Brightway2 for LCA research. Topics covered: Computational structure of LCA. Computer simulation and statistical approaches for uncertainty and sensitivity analysis in LCA. LCA reproducibility and data sharing. The module includes exercises.

Module 2. Consequential LCA (Bo Weidema) Students will learn the fundamentals of Consequential LCA. Topics covered: Introduction to attributional and consequential models. Algorithms for performing consequential LCA in the definition of functional unit, consumption mix, and identification of determining and dependent co-products. Communicating consequential models. The module includes exercises.

Module 3. Input output LCA (Jannick Schmidt) Students will learn the fundamentals of Input-Output modelling. Topics covered: supply-use tables, multi-regional models and trade linking. Integrating process LCA and IO-analysis via hybrid LCA, tiered and embedded. The module includes exercises.

Preliminary programme

Day 1

(08:00-16:00).

Day 2

(08:00-16:00).

Day 3

(08:00-16:00).

Day 4

(08:00-16:00).

Day 5

 

Day 6

Day 7

(08:00-16:00).

Tue 19 May

(08:00-16:00).

Module   1

LCA   intro

Module   1

LCA   intro

Module   2

Conseq   LCA

Module   2 Conseq LCA

Break

Break

Module   3

IO   LCA

Module   3

IO   LCA

 

Lecturers

Bo Weidema, Professor Jannick Schmidt, Associate Professor Massimo Pizzol, Associate professor Søren Løkke, Associate professor Agneta Ghose, Postdoc

Registration and info

Please apply via mail to the course organizer Massimo Pizzol (massimo@plan.aau.dk). You must provide the following information in the email: Full name / Profession (PhD student, postdoc, consultant…) / Institution name / Address / email address / Phone nr / your research field or Phd topic / your experience with LCA

ECTS Distribution The five ECTS credits of the course are divided roughly in this way:

 

Activity

Hours

ECTS

Lectures and group work in class

50

1.8

Readings

35

1.3

Group work prior to course

20

0.7

Group work after   course

35

1.3

Total

140

5.0

*One ECTS credit is equivalent to 28 hours of work

 Activities: Includes attending to the lectures and performing exercises in class.

 Readings: Approx. 100 pages of scientific articles and reports, that are provided to the students, plus python tutorials.

 Group work: students work in groups (max 5 people). Each group will work on a case study and apply the knowledge of the course on the case study.

EXAMPLE, a group works on an LCA of a product and does:

-        prior to the course: choice of product and data mining, getting base knowledge and data to describe the product system.

-        during the course (exercises in class): consequential inventory with matrix format, IO LCA inventory, inclusion of iLUC, inclusion of social impacts, etc.

-        after the course: organize the material and prepare a portfolio/article where all the techniques are presented for the case study.

Eventually, all portfolios are made available. Each student will thus get the info on five different cases. Students should be able to organize themselves using online tools (skype, dropbox etc) to collaborate in group remotely prior and after the course.

Organiser: Massimo Pizzol; massimo@plan.aau.dk
Lecturers: Bo Weidema, Jannick Schmidt, Massimo Pizzol, Søren Løkke, Agneta Ghose

ECTS for students: 5
Time: 
12-19 May 2020 
Place: 
Aalborg University, Rendsburggade 14, room Rdb14 3.329, 9000 Aalborg (DK) The course will be given ONLINE due to COVID-19 restrictions
Deadline for registration:
 1 April 2020
Max. no. of participants: 
25

Important information concerning PhD courses: We have over some time experienced problems with no-show for both project and general courses. It has now reached a point where we are forced to take action. Therefore, the Doctoral School has decided to introduce a no-show fee of DKK 3,000 for each course where the student does not show up. Cancellations are accepted no later than 2 weeks before start of the course. Registered illness is of course an acceptable reason for not showing up on those days. Furthermore, all courses open for registration approximately four months before start. This can hopefully also provide new students a chance to register for courses during the year. We look forward to your registrations.

 

This PhD course has been postponed to fall 2020

Description:
Smart cities have mostly been seen as cities where a variety of city functions such as transportation, communications, heating etc. are supported by new technology solutions, first and foremost ICTs. However, criticism has also been put forward emphasizing that smart city information technologies can be used for increased surveillance and manipulation of behavior. In this course, we will examine and discuss the potentials for improvement of city functions as well as the problems that increased registration and guided assistance may entail.

The course addresses PhD students from technical sciences as well as social sciences. It provides a critical analysis of technology solutions as well as knowledge on technology developments helping social science students to better understand the material foundations of smart city technologies. The technologies presented and analyzed in the course are new network technologies including 5G, Internet of Things, cloud computing and artificial intelligence and machine learning.
The approach taken in the course will be to examine the materiality of smart cities, meaning that technology solutions are not just seen as expressions of functions to be fulfilled but also are seen as material realities that have an influence on the developments of social behavior in a dialectic interplay.

The course will include the following topics:
• Smart city solutions for city functions
• Communication foundations for smart cities: scenarios, use cases, and communication-theoretic principles.
• Network technologies including 5G and IoT
• Cloud computing
• Artificial intelligence and machine learning
• Institutional analysis
• The concept of materiality
• Smart city standardization

Organiser/s: Reza Tadayoni, Čedomir Stefanović and Anders Henten
Lecturer(s): Reza Tadayoni, Čedomir Stefanović, Anders Henten and Sokol Kosta

ECTS for students: 3.0
Time: The course has been postponed to fall 2020 - dates to be announced
Place: Aalborg University, Copenhagen Campus, Place to be announced
Deadline for registration: new date tba
Max. no. of participants: 20

Important information concerning PhD courses: We have over some time experienced problems with no-show for both project and general courses. It has now reached a point where we are forced to take action. Therefore, the Doctoral School has decided to introduce a no-show fee of DKK 3,000 for each course where the student does not show up. Cancellations are accepted no later than 2 weeks before start of the course. Registered illness is of course an acceptable reason for not showing up on those days. Furthermore, all courses open for registration approximately four months before start. This can hopefully also provide new students a chance to register for courses during the year. We look forward to your registrations.

Update: Course will be conducted online

Due to the current situation, the PhD Study Director has decided that PhD courses scheduled for April, May and June should take place as online courses. For this particular course, this will mean that we will provide you with resources for self-study – a combination of video lectures, readings, and exercises – to go through at your own pace. In addition, there will be Q&A sessions on Microsoft Teams twice for each of the three days, and the two course organizers will be available online for advice for the three days as well.

 

Content
The PhD course Python for Geospatial Analysis will provide an introduction to Python with a focus on mapping, exploring, processing, and analyzing geospatial information using Python. Participants will learn how tasks traditionally conducted in a desktop GIS system can be easily transferred to Python code and therefore made faster, more flexible, and completely reproducible, which is an aspect of increasing importance in many research fields. At the end of this course, participants will have a solid understanding of the capabilities of core Python modules for geospatial information such as fiona, geopandas, pysal, or rasterio and be able to apply them in their own research.

This course will focus on geospatial analysis in “pure” Python, i.e., automation of tasks in ArcGIS or QGIS with Python is out of scope for this course. However, participants looking to do this should be sufficiently proficient in Python after this course to accomplish these tasks on their own.

Day 1: General introduction to Python, mapping and explorative analysis of geographic information

Day 2: The Python stack for geospatial analysis

Day 3: Using geospatial web services from Python

Organization
The course will consist of 3 parts, which in combination will be worth 3 ECTS for the participants. Part 1 consists of introductory readings as well as setting up the software environment on the participants’ machine before we start our face-to-face sessions. This second part will consist of the three days in April where we will meet at AAU CPH. Each day will consist of more lecture-oriented content in the morning, and extensive hands-on exercises in the afternoon. On the last day of the meeting, a larger project will be introduced that has to be completed and delivered by each participant as the third part of the course.

Prerequisites
While this course will introduce Python from scratch (i.e., no previous experience in Python is required), participants should have a basic understanding of programming principles, e.g. know what a variable, a function, or a loop is. Likewise, we do not expect participants to be GIS experts, but again, a basic understanding of geographic information concepts such as layers or vector/raster formats is expected. Ideally, participants in this course would already be using GIS in some way for their research and be looking for ways to do this more efficiently.

Organiser/s: Carsten Kessler, Jamal Jokar Arsanjani
Lecturer(s): Carsten Kessler, Jamal Jokar Arsanjani

ECTS for students: 3
Time: 27–29 May 2020
Place: Aalborg University, Copenhagen - ONLINE 
Deadline for registration: 6 May 2020
Max. no. of participants: 20

Important information concerning PhD courses: We have over some time experienced problems with no-show for both project and general courses. It has now reached a point where we are forced to take action. Therefore, the Doctoral School has decided to introduce a no-show fee of DKK 3,000 for each course where the student does not show up. Cancellations are accepted no later than 2 weeks before start of the course. Registered illness is of course an acceptable reason for not showing up on those days. Furthermore, all courses open for registration approximately four months before start. This can hopefully also provide new students a chance to register for courses during the year. We look forward to your registrations.

Welcome to ONLINE course - Applying practice theory in social science research (2020)

Theories of practice has a long history within the social sciences, which include the work of prominent scholars such as Pierre Bourdieu (Bourdieu 1977, 1990) and Anthony Giddens (Giddens 1984). However, more recent accounts of practice theory offered by Theodor Schatzki (1996) and Andreas Reckwitz (2002) has led to a renewed engagement, for example by referring to a “practice turn” within the social sciences (Schatzki, Knorr-Cetina, and Savigny 2001) and Allan Warde’s (2005) introduction to the field of sociology of consumption. The variety of these contributions also means that there is no unified account of practice theory (Nicolini 2012). However, family resemblances are found in emphasizing routinized activity, shared (embodied) understanding and the role of materiality in the performance of social practices (Warde 2014, 2015). 

Practice theory is quite widespread within for instance studies of consumption and innovation, whereas it in broader approaches of social sciences still appears as a fairly new but promising research agenda.

This course focuses on how to apply practice theory within research fields that so far has been deemphasized, overlooked or forgotten. This is done by 1) presenting a variety of research examples from the perspective of practice theory, and 2) practicing how to apply theories of practice in research.

The course requires familiarity with the foundation of theories of practice. The following sources may serve as inspiration:

-        Reckwitz, Andreas. 2002. “Toward a Theory of Social Practices A Development in Culturalist Theorizing.” European Journal of Social Theory 5(2):243–63.

-        Schatzki, Theodore R. 1996. “Social Practices”, Chapter 4 in Social Practices: A Wittgensteinian Approach to Human Activity and the Social. Cambridge University Press: 88-131.  

-        Warde, Alan. 2005. “Consumption and Theories of Practice.” Journal of Consumer Culture 5(2):131–153.

Learning outcomes

The course will introduce the students to how theories of practice can be applied on various research topics. Through discussions and workshops, the student will practice how to relate the topics and theoretical discussions to current debates as well as to their own PhD research.

The course encourage participants to delve into new ways of using practice theory in empirical research, for example by applying well-known approaches on new empirical fields or re-inventing approaches to study well-described empirical fields.

Organiser/s: Anders Rhiger Hansen, arh@sbi.aau.dk 
Lecturer(s):  Anders Rhiger Hansen, arh@sbi.aau.dk, Kirsten Gram-Hanssen kgh@build.aau.dk
ECTS for students: 3.0
Time:  11, 14, 18, 25, 26 May and  2, 16 June 2020
Place: Aalborg University, Copenhagen - ONLINE
Deadline for registration: 25 April 2020
Max. no. of participants: 10

Important information concerning PhD courses:  We have over some time experienced problems with no-show for both project and general courses. It has now reached a point where we are forced to take action. Therefore, the Doctoral School has decided to introduce a no-show fee of DKK 3,000 for each course where the student does not show up. Cancellations are accepted no later than 2 weeks before start of the course. Registered illness is of course an acceptable reason for not showing up on those days. Furthermore, all courses open for registration approximately four months before start. This can hopefully also provide new students a chance to register for courses during the year. We look forward to your registrations.

Welcome to Design and Planning for Sustainable Transitions

Description:
There is an increasing interest to develop tools, methods, theories and knowledge on how to support design and planning processes that are part of sustainable transitions. This emerging interest builds upon a scholarship on Sustainable Transitions, Innovation Studies, Science and Technology Studies, Design, Strategic Planning and Engineering. The course will provide the students with a state of the art of this academic initiative and an overview of examples of Design for Sustainable Transitions projects in Finland, Australia, Denmark and the US.

Prerequisites: Being enrolled in a relevant PhD program.

Learning objectives: The students who take this course will by the end of it be capable of:

... describing the main bodies of knowledge and the main theories that can inform Design and Planning for Sustainable Transitions.
... describing exemplary projects that integrate insights from the fields of Sustainable Transitions, Innovation Studies, Science and Technology Studies, Design, Strategic Planning and Engineering
... position their own project in relation to the state of the art of Design and Planning for Sustainable Transitions
... evaluate existing design methods and tools and adjust and improve them for Design and Planning for Sustainable Transitions
... justify how their project is a contribution to this emerging field and the sources it builds upon

Teaching methods:
Writing theoretical assignments
Participating in expert lectures
Presenting own work and elaborating on progress
Participating on workshops to analyse and improve on existing methods and tools

Criteria for Assessment:
The students who deliver on the assignments, participate in the lectures and workshops and deliver a final paper will approve the course and obtain the credits.

Key literature:
Buchanan, R. (2001). Design research and the new learning. Design issues, 17(4), 3-23.

Ceschin, F., & Gaziulusoy, I. (2016). Evolution of design for sustainability: From product design to design for system innovations and transitions. Design Studies, 47, 118-163.

Dym, C. L., Agogino, A. M., Eris, O., Frey, D. D., & Leifer, L. J. (2005). Engineering design thinking, teaching, and learning. Journal of Engineering Education, 94(1), 103-120.

Flyvbjerg, B. (2001) Making Social Science Matter: Why Social Inquiry Fails and How it can Succeed Again. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Forrester, J. W. (1994). System dynamics, systems thinking, and soft OR. System dynamics review, 10(2‐3), 245-256.

Gaziulusoy, A. I. (2015). A critical review of approaches available for design and innovation teams through the perspective of sustainability science and system innovation theories. Journal of Cleaner Production, 107, 366-377.

Gaziulusoy, A. I., & Brezet, H. (2015). Design for system innovations and transitions: a conceptual framework integrating insights from sustainablity science and theories of system innovations and transitions. Journal of Cleaner Production, 108, 558-568.

Gaziulusoy, A. İ., & Ryan, C. (2017). Roles of design in sustainability transitions projects: A case study of Visions and Pathways 2040 project from Australia. Journal of Cleaner Production, 162, 1297-1307.

Irwin, T. (2015). Transition design: A proposal for a new area of design practice, study, and research. Design and Culture, 7(2), 229-246.

Jørgensen, U., & Brodersen, S. (Eds.). (2016). Engineering Professionalism: Engineering Practices in Work and Education. Springer.

Krumdieck, S. (2013). Transition engineering: adaptation of complex systems for survival. International Journal of Sustainable Development 4, 16(3-4), 310-321.

Köhler, J., Geels, F., Kern, F., Onsongo, E., & Wieczorek, A. (2017). A research agenda for the Sustaina-bility Transitions Research Network.

Loorbach, D. (2010). Transition management for sustainable development: a prescriptive, complexity‐based governance framework. Governance, 23(1), 161-183.

Meadows, D. (1997). Places to Intervene in a System. Whole Earth, 91(1), 78-84.

Nowotny, H. (2005). The increase of complexity and its reduction: Emergent interfaces between the natural sciences, humanities and social sciences. Theory, Culture & Society, 22(5), 15-31.

Sørensen, K. H., Lagesen, V. A., & Hojem, T. S. M. (2018). Articulations of sustainability transition agency. Mundane transition work among consulting engineers. Environmental Innovation and Societal Transitions.

Willis, A. M. (2015). Transition Design: the need to refuse discipline and transcend instrumentalism. Design Philosophy Papers, 13(1), 69-74.

Relevance for students at Aalborg University: this course offers up to date lectures and knowledge on tools and methods to bridge the gap between theories and projects in Planning and Design aimed at supporting processes for Sustainable Transitions. It will offer valuable sociotechnical knowledge to students on the technical careers and a stronger foundation to students on planning and design to tackle transition processes.

Anchoring: the course is offer by experts and researchers from the fields of Design, Design for Sustainable Transitions, Infrastructure and Sustainable Transitions, Circular Economy and others. All the researchers from Aalborg belong to the BDO section of the Planning Institute in Copenhagen.

Scientific level: State of the Art.

Organiser/s: Andrés Felipe Valderrama Pineda and Jens Stissing Jensen

Lecturer(s):
 Idil Gaziulusoy (Aalto University); Arne Remmen, Monia Niero, Michael Søgaard Jørgensen, Christian Clausen, Jens S Jensen, Birgitte Hoffman, Maj-Britt Quitzau, Andrés Felipe Valderrama Pineda (Aalborg University)

ECTS: 5.0
Time: March 9-10-11 2020
Place: Aalborg University, Copenhagen Campus, A. C. Meyers Vænge 15, room ACM15 2.2.040A
Deadline for registration: 9 February 2020
Max. no. of participants: 15

Important information concerning PhD courses: We have over some time experienced problems with no-show for both project and general courses. It has now reached a point where we are forced to take action. Therefore, the Doctoral School has decided to introduce a no-show fee of DKK 3,000 for each course where the student does not show up. Cancellations are accepted no later than 2 weeks before start of the course. Registered illness is of course an acceptable reason for not showing up on those days. Furthermore, all courses open for registration approximately four months before start. This can hopefully also provide new students a chance to register for courses during the year. We look forward to your registrations.