Welcome to Understanding theory of science

Description:
Theory of science is an attempt to comprehend science, in order to better identify it, shape it, guide it, and perhaps endorse or denounce it. To do this theory of science use philosophical topics, such as epistemology, ontology and axiology. Other fields, like sociology and semiotics, also form the theoretical and methodological base for the analysis of science. In some sense, theory of science is a form of meta-scientific inquiry, but it is also a form of reflexivity within science itself.

Every scientist, Ph.D. students perhaps more than others, can at times come to find themselves in need of “thinking things through”. Whether it springs out of doubt, or from the need to defend, or something third, is of lesser importance. The point is merely that every once in a while we need to carefully consider the science that we represent, in order to locate or re-locate ourselves in it or to justify the enterprise we’re involved with. The quality of our scientific work will undoubtable benefit from our ability to better comprehend the fundamental conditions, values and presumptions that more or less explicitly forms the scientific requirements and expectations in the first place.

This course offers the opportunity to practice the art of theory of science, to better acquaint oneself with the field, and to learn how to apply its thoughts and positions to the science and the scientist of one’s own. The focus of the course will be current problems in theory of science that are relevant for research in the health sciences and the technological and natural sciences. These topics could be issues of measurement, facts, objectivism, and ‘evidence-based’; but also issues like stakeholders, the role and influence of tools, peer-review and reductionism.

The course will be topic oriented workshops or seminars, with the lecturer as a presenter, but more importantly as a facilitator of qualified deliberation on the topics. The sessions will therefore require active participation and an open mind from everyone involved.

I look forward to some wonderful joint explorations into some meaningful topics of relevance and value for the quality of ourselves and of our work.  

 

Organizer: Associate Professor Patrik Kristoffer Kjærsdam Telléus, pkt@hst.aau.dk

Lecturers: Associate Professor Patrik Kristoffer Kjærsdam Telléus

ECTS: 2

Time: 2-4 and 8 June 2020

Place:

Zip code: 9220

City: Aalborg

Number of seats: 15

Deadline: 11 May 2020


Important information concerning PhD courses: We have over some time experienced problems with no-show for both project and general courses. It has now reached a point where we are forced to take action. Therefore, the Doctoral School has decided to introduce a no-show fee of DKK 5,000 for each course where the student does not show up. Cancellations are accepted no later than 2 weeks before start of the course. Registered illness is of course an acceptable reason for not showing up on those days. Furthermore, all courses open for registration approximately four months before start. This can hopefully also provide new students a chance to register for courses during the year. We look forward to your registrations.

 

 

Welcome to Interdisciplinary Research Design

Description: Many PhD projects at Aalborg University are ‘born interdisciplinary’. Equally, there is an increasing value attached to the interdisciplinary theme in the research funding community and public debate. Regardless hereof the tools and skills for thinking about interdisciplinary research designs has not been addressed and developed sufficiently amongst PhD students. The course is therefore motivated by this gap. It targets all PhD students with projects that are interdisciplinary either as a key feature of their initial design (‘born interdisciplinary’), or the ones that incrementally moves towards this as a function of an emerging awareness to the importance of an expanded research design during the process (‘becoming interdisciplinary’). Next to this existing gap in interdisciplinary research skills the course is motivated by an observation made over several years, namely that different scientific disciplines only is one level of needed cross-fertilization. Another is the ability to move more effortless across different methods, either in order to triangulate, or simply because of the nature of the research question. The PBL oriented research-design model need to take an interdisciplinary approach that includes actual scientific disciplines and their theoretical and conceptual apparatuses, as well as the multitude of methods of relevance to complex and real-life research questions. Finally, the course is motivated by an interest in bringing such an increased interdisciplinary awareness and skill-development in sync with the requirements for contemporary research dissemination and communication. In other words, the course takes the interdisciplinary approach to theories and methods as the outset for developing a more nuanced understanding of research communication. The first two dimensions of the motive are ‘internal’ to the research process (interdisciplinary thinking, theories and methods) and the third dimension is ‘external’ to the research process (communication and dissemination).

 

Prerequisites: The only prerequisite is a master degree and a PhD scholarship.

 

Learning objectives: The main learning objective is that the PhD student becomes able to identify the relevant dimensions of interdisciplinary research design in her or his own project (either as what is there from the outset (‘born’) or what might be implemented during the research process (‘becoming’). Next, participants must be able to develop a motivated and well-argued plan for any interdisciplinary research design proposal amendments.  

 

Teaching methods:The course utilizes literature studies, lecture formats, workshop formats, creative writing, metaphorical analysis, awareness shaping techniques, research communication and dissemination exercises, and essay writing.

 

Criteria for assessment: Active participation and presence during the course. For the participants opting for the 4 ECTS version, submission of a written essay to the course organizer within the stablished deadline is furthermore an assessment criteria.

 

Key Literature: Some of the key literature within Interdisciplinary research is set as the curriculum (see below). However, given the critical and explorative nature of the course we shall also look into readings that may look less obvious, but which have the critical creative potential for stimulating new ideas and thoughts.

  • Bark, Rosalind H., Marit E. Kragt and Barbara J. Robson (2016) Evaluating an interdisciplinary research project: Lessons learned for organisations, researchers and funders, International Journal of Project Management, 34 (2016) 1449–1459
  • BENSON, THOMAS C. (1982) FIVE ARGUMENTS AGAINST INTERDISCIPLINARY STUDIES, ISSUES IN INTEGRATIVE STUDIES, No. 1, pp. 38-48 (1982)
    Committee on Facilitating Interdisciplinary Research, Committee on Science, Engineering, and Public Policy (2004). Facilitating interdisciplinary research. National Academies. Washington: National Academy Press
  • Carr, Gemma, Daniel P. Loucks and Günter Blöschl (2018) Gaining insight into interdisciplinary research and education programmes: A framework for evaluation Research Policy 47 (2018) 35–48

  • Darbellay, F. (2012) "The circulation of knowledge as an interdisciplinary process: Travelling concepts, analogies, and metaphors," Issues in Interdisciplinary Studies 30 (2012)
  • Derrick, Edward G., Holly J. Falk-Krzesinski and Melanie R. Roberts (eds.) (2011) Facilitating Interdisciplinary Research and Education:  A Practical Guide, American Association for the Advancement of Science and the Colorado Initiative in Molecular Biology of the University of Colorado, Boulder
  • Jones, Casey (2009) "Interdisciplinary Approach - Advantages, Disadvantages, and the Future Benefits of Interdisciplinary Studies," ESSAI: Vol. 7, Article 26. Available at: http://dc.cod.edu/essai/vol7/iss1/26
  • Lakoff, G & M. Johnson (1980) Metaphors We Live By, Chicago: University of Chicago Press
  • Latour, B. (1988) Mixing Humans and Nonhumans Together: The Sociology of the Door-Closer, Social Problems, vol. 35, no. 3, June 1988, pp. 298-310 (Written under the pseudonym of Jim Johnson)
  • Stilgoe, J. R (1998) Outside Lies Magic. Regaining History and Awareness in Everyday Life Places, New York: Walker and Company
  • Szostak, Rick (2007) How and Why to Teach Interdisciplinary Research Practice, Journal of Research Practice Volume 3, Issue 2, Article M17, 2007
  • van Rijnsoever, Frank J. and Laurens K. Hessels (2011) Factors associated with disciplinary and interdisciplinary research collaboration, Research Policy, 40 (2011) 463–47
  • Yaneva, A. (2017) Five Ways of Making Architecture Political. An Introduction to the Politics of Design Practice, London: Bloomsbury, pp. 31-52 (Chapter 2: How to Study Ecology of Practice)

 

Organizer: Professor Ole B. Jensen, obje@create.aau.dk

Lecturer: Professor Ole B. Jensen + invited guest.

Date: 24-26 November 2020

ECTS: 2,5 (without essay) or 4 (with essay)

Place:

City: Aalborg

Number of seats: 20

Deadline: 3 November 2020

 

Important information concerning PhD courses: We have over some time experienced problems with no-show for both project and general courses. It has now reached a point where we are forced to take action. Therefore, the Doctoral School has decided to introduce a no-show fee of DKK 5,000 for each course where the student does not show up. Cancellations are accepted no later than 2 weeks before start of the course. Registered illness is of course an acceptable reason for not showing up on those days. Furthermore, all courses open for registration approximately four months before start. This can hopefully also provide new students a chance to register for courses during the year. We look forward to your registrations.

Welcome to Ethics and Social Responsibilities for Scientists and Engineers in the 21st Century


Description: The course addresses ethical dilemmas that researchers might face in turbulent times, where clear-cut distinctions between pure and applied science can no longer be upheld, and try to create a space where the participating PhD students can qualify their reflections on their role as young researchers by drawing on philosophical, sociological, and ethical perspectives in analyzing possibilities and problems of contemporary science, engineering and technology. During the course the participants are asked to ethically analyze their own PhD projects, and present their analyses. To facilitate the ethical analyses of PhD projects a number of topical case-studies and relevant analytical tools are presented.

You will find all course information here on Moodle. You will find the texts and the tasks for each day in one folder.

The course is designed so that each day is split up into two sessions: One before lunch and one after. Usually a session begins with a lecture (90 minutes, including breaks) followed by discussions or group work.

During the last session on the third day participants are kindly asked to do a PP presentation on ethical issues in their Ph.D. project (duration: no more than 15 minutes). We will use the group work and discussions during the first two days to qualify your presentation. It is, however a good idea, to begin reflecting on ethical issues in your project when you read the course material.

Reading the text material connected to the lectures, and preparing a PP presentation on ethical aspects of your Ph.D. project, are mandatory activities for all participants.

I hope you will have some enlightening and reflective days.

Best Regards Tom Børsen



Organizer: Associate professor Tom Børsen, Aalborg University, email: boersen@plan.aau.dk

Lecturers: External Lecturer and Honorary Associate Professor Klavs Birkholm


ECTS: 2.5

Time: 10-12 June 2020

Place: 

Zip code: 
2450

City: 
Copenhagen

Number of seats: 30

Deadline: 20 May 2020

 

Important information concerning PhD courses: We have over some time experienced problems with no-show for both project and general courses. It has now reached a point where we are forced to take action. Therefore, the Doctoral School has decided to introduce a no-show fee of DKK 5,000 for each course where the student does not show up. Cancellations are accepted no later than 2 weeks before start of the course. Registered illness is of course an acceptable reason for not showing up on those days. Furthermore, all courses open for registration approximately four months before start. This can hopefully also provide new students a chance to register for courses during the year. We look forward to your registrations.