Description: This PhD course addresses sampling, sample preparation and state-of-the-art analytical techniques to analyze microplastics in environmental samples.

The course will start with some theory on suitable techniques for microplastics research, and an introduction to infrared spectroscopy and pyrolysis GC-MS. From here, focus shifts towards sampling techniques for microplastics, and treatment for clean-up of samples. We will discuss the steps needed in cleaning up samples for natural organic and inorganic matter, as well as getting samples ready for subsequent identification. Part of the course is interactive where you will have the possibility to go into the lab with samples.

The next step in analysis is identification of plastic material, and size. The consensus is that FTIR based techniques are most promising for this. Especially techniques applying µFTIR imaging – the combination of light microscopy with spectral images generated by Focal Plane Array (FPA) or linear array-based instruments to a particle assembly – have proven highly promising. Another promising (and possibly complementary) technique for identification of plastic material is pyrolysis GC-MS. This course will provide an introduction to both techniques, along with some hands-on learning possibilities.

The last step in microplastics research is the interpretation of obtained data. We provide our solution for it in the software siMPle (formerly known as MPhunter), which is used for (semi-)automated µFTIR imaging data interpretation. You will be taught how it works and will get first-hand experience during our practice session. 

All steps require a high degree of expertise and training. This course is aimed to introduce participants too all steps and discuss issues, pros and cons of different approaches, and is in general very open and informally structured to promote discussions.

As a participant you have the option of bringing samples from your own research.

Organizer: Jes Vollertsen, Claudia Lorenz

Lecturers:  Rob Wills (Agilent Technologies, Inc. UK), Alessio Gomiero (NORCE, Norway), Sebastian Primpke (AWI, Germany), Jes Vollertsen (AAU), Claudia Lorenz (AAU) and others.”

ECTS: 5.0

Time: 9 - 13 November 2020

Place: Section of Water & Environment, BUILD, Aalborg University. Thomas Manns Vej 23, Aalborg Øst, Denmark

City: Aalborg

Number of seats: 15

Deadline: 19 October 2020

Important information concerning PhD courses: We have over some time experienced problems with no-show for both project and general courses. It has now reached a point where we are forced to take action. Therefore, the Doctoral School has decided to introduce a no-show fee of DKK 5,000 for each course where the student does not show up. Cancellations are accepted no later than 2 weeks before start of the course. Registered illness is of course an acceptable reason for not showing up on those days. Furthermore, all courses open for registration approximately three months before start. This can hopefully also provide new students a chance to register for courses during the year. We look forward to your registrations.

Description:

The present course provides the background, methods and tools for decision analysis on the optimal management of engineered systems.

Topics/lectures of the course include:

  • Statistics and Bayesian probability theory
  • Bayesian decision analysis
  • Information management
  • Probabilistic system characteristics
  • Optimization and acceptance criteria
  • Time invariant/variant reliability methods
  • Monte Carlo techniques
  • Modern systems reliability techniques
  • Bayesian Nets and Bayesian modeling
  • Big Data techniques
  • Applications

Application domains include, but are not limited to energy production systems, traffic infrastructure systems, buildings and structures, offshore and marine systems.

The course consists of lectures, exercises, mini-projects and self-study. Lecture notes will be provided in advance of the course.

Participants
The course is intended for PhD students, academics and professionals from the industry and public authorities, working in the field of risk informed management of engineered facilities and structures in the area of civil engineering, such as:
• Bridges, tunnels and roadway systems
• Wind turbines and wind turbine parks
• Electricity grid systems
• Offshore oil and gas production facilities
The course is offered at national and international level. All lectures will be given in English.

ECTS: 5.0 

Organiser: Professor Michael Havbro Faber, Department for the Built Environment, AAU.

Lectures: 

Professor M. H. Faber, AAU, DK

Professor J. D. Sørensen, AAU, DK

PhD, M. Schubert, Matrisk GmbH, CH

Professor J. Nielsen, AAU, DK

PhD Fellow, S. Tølbøll Glavind, AAU, DK

PhD Fellow, J. G. Sepúlveda Astudillo, AAU, DK

Post Doc H. Brüske, AAU, DK

Post Doc José Guadalupe Rangel Ramirez, AAU, DK

Course location: Department for the Built Environment, Thomas Manns Vej 23, 9220 Aalborg Ø, Denmark

Dates: 25-29 May 2020.    New course dates will be announced soonest possible.

Course registration deadline: 4 May 2020.

Important information concerning PhD courses: We have over some time experienced problems with no-show for both project and general courses. It has now reached a point where we are forced to take action. Therefore, the Doctoral School has decided to introduce a no-show fee of DKK 3,000 for each course where the student does not show up. Cancellations are accepted no later than 2 weeks before start of the course. Registered illness is of course an acceptable reason for not showing up on those days. Furthermore, all courses open for registration approximately four months before start. This can hopefully also provide new students a chance to register for courses during the year. We look forward to your registrations.

  • Description:

    The work to develop wave energy converters (WECs) typically involves intensive laboratory model testing in wave tanks and/or flumes at the earlier stages, and intensive testing and monitoring of prototypes in real seas at later stages. During the various development steps numerical modeling offers possibilities of investigation of larger parameter ranges than allowable in experimental modeling, and is therefore an essential tool for optimization. When working with optimization of the power performance of a wave energy device, the control hereof, via the power take-off system is of paramount importance.The Wave Energy Research Group at Aalborg University (AAU), Department of Civil Engineering offers a PhD course running over two consecutive weeks.
    The course is split into 3 modules:
    • General introduction, experimental modeling and testing
    • Numerical modeling
    • WEC control and experimental implementation

  • General introduction, experimental modeling and testing:
    The objective of the first module of the course is to introduce and apply wave analysis theory, laboratory measuring techniques, prototype monitoring and control. The module will include class room lectures, laboratory exercises in the wave tanks/flumes and a visit to a wave energy test installation in real sea.
    This module will include the following subjects:
    • Wave analysis
    • Measuring techniques for waves, loadings and power take-off
    • Analysis of laboratory and real sea data for performance evaluation

  • Numerical modeling:
    The objective of the second module of the course is to introduce and getting experience with running numerical models of WECs including modeling of PTO and its control. The module will include class room lectures and exercises.
    This module will include the following subjects:
    • The state of the art of numerical modeling for WECs
    • Limitations of these techniques and the existence of other numerical approaches for hydrodynamic modeling
    • Development of a numerical wave to wire model

  • WEC control and experimental implementation:
    The objective of the third module of the course is to go through the basics of control of WECs (based on wave activated bodies) and work its way through to more complex control approaches. The module will include class room lectures, laboratory exercises in the wave tanks/flumes
    This module will include the following subjects:
    • Model Identification strategy for WECs
    • Control of wave energy devices
    • Implementation of WEC control methods in experimental testing

The course is arranged through the Doctoral School of Engineering and Science at Aalborg University.

For PhD students registered at any university, participation in the course itself is free. However, a fee will be charged to cover expenses for lunches, coffee, transportation, etc. For non-PhD students, an additional registration fee will also be charged. The fees will be charged after the registration deadline is passed and registrants have got the confirmation of participation.

The course is of relevance to PhD students and others with interests in development of wave energy devices.

Prerequisites

  • Degree in Engineering

    Basic knowledge of Matlab or any other programming language

    Some knowledge of fluid mechanics and wave kinematics, dynamic structures/mechanical systems, potential flow (linear wave) theory.

    Fourier transform and stochastic processes, as well as good skills in mathematical analysis.



  • Organizers:

    Francesco Ferri (AAU) e-mail: ff@civil.aau.dk

    Jens Peter Kofoed (AAU) e-mail: jpk@civil.aau.dk)

  • Lecturers: Francesco Ferri and Jens Peter Kofoed.

  • ECTS: 6

  • Time: 6-17 January 2020

  • Place: Aalborg University

  • Zip code: 9220

  • City: Aalborg

  • Number of seats: 24

  • Deadline: 15 November 2019

Important information concerning PhD courses 
We have over some time experienced problems with no-show for both
project and general courses. It has now reached a point where we are forced to
take action. Therefore, the Doctoral School has decided to introduce a no-show
fee of DKK 5,000 for each course where the student does not show up.
Cancellations are accepted no later than 2 weeks before start of the course.
Registered illness is of course an acceptable reason for not showing up on
those days. Furthermore, all courses open for registration approximately three
months before start. This can hopefully also provide new students a chance to
register for courses during the year. We look forward to your registrations