Welcome to PBL and Mixed Methods

In this PhD course there will be focus on research design for how to study problem- and project-based learning by applying a mixed methods approach. Mixed methods are a comprehensive research design applying both qualitative and quantitative methods which can be combined in various ways depending on the research questions.

The course will start by focusing on formulation of research questions in a PBL curriculum, followed by introduction to mixed methods designs and the advantages and disadvantages by different mixed methods combinations.

The participants will work on a research design for one of four cases that will be presented to the participants. There will also be possibility to work on own research questions as well as research designs.

There will be pre-tasks before the course will start. This will be sent out just after deadline for the course. And there will be a final reflection on the research design.

References:

Creswell, J. W. (2013). Research Design: Qualitative, Quantitative, and Mixed Methods Approaches, 4th Edition (4th edition ed.). Thousand Oaks: SAGE Publications, Inc.

Kolmos, A., & de Graaff, E. (2014). Problem-Based and Project-Based Learning in Engineering Education. In Merging Models (pp. 141-161): Cambridge University Press.

Strobel, J., & Van Barneveld, A. (2009). When is PBL more effective? A meta-synthesis of meta-analyses comparing PBL to conventional classrooms. Interdisciplinary Journal of Problem-based Learning, 3(1), 4.

Tashakkori, A., & Creswell, J. W. (2007). Exploring the nature of research questions in mixed methods research. In: Sage Publications Sage CA: Los Angeles, CA.

Organizers: Anette Kolmos ak@plan.aau.dk , Jette Holgaard jeh@plan.aau.dk

Lecturers: Anette Kolmos, Jette Holgaard, Diana Steentoft and Thomas Ryberg

ECTS: 4

Time: 13-15 May 2019, starting at 9:00 each day

Place: AAU, Aalborg, Rendsburggade 6, room 6.171

City: 9000 Aalborg

Number of seats: 30

Deadline: 30 April 2019


Important information concerning PhD courses: We have over some time experienced problems with no-show for both project and general courses. It has now reached a point where we are forced to take action. Therefore, the Doctoral School has decided to introduce a no-show fee of DKK 5,000 for each course where the student does not show up. Cancellations are accepted no later than 2 weeks before start of the course. Registered illness is of course an acceptable reason for not showing up on those days. Furthermore, all courses open for registration approximately three months before start. This can hopefully also provide new students a chance to register for courses during the year. We look forward to your registrations.

Welcome to Marine Governance and Maritime Spatial Planning: theories and practices
Description: During this course, students will develop a thorough understanding of the state of the art in Marine Governance and Maritime Spatial Planning (MSP). Students will be introduced to current issues and debates in marine governance and MSP that are discussed in social scientific literature, such as regionalization, Authority at sea, governing new economic activities in weak institutional settings (such as deep-sea mining and the Arctic), power, equity and participation.

Prerequisites: an approved PhD proposal by a research school.

Learning objectives:

After having completed the course successfully, students are expected to:

have a thorough understanding of current influential theories and themes within marine governance and Maritime Spatial Planning;
apply the key concepts developed within theories on policy analysis and governance in the domain of Marine Governance and Maritime Spatial Planning;
analyze and evaluate contemporary problems, developments and issues in marine governance and MSP practices;
critically assess the application of the theories and themes of this course in marine governance and MSP practices.
Teaching methods: This course consists of a mix of lectures, seminars and workshops. In the lectures, theories and concepts will be introduced and explained. During the workshops, participants present their own work and one of the other participants will give a review of the paper. During the seminar, students shall reflect on the lectures, the literature and the presentations.

Criteria for assessment: Before the course, the students write a paper/essay of 10 pages. The paper will be send to one of the other participants for peer review 1 month before the course. During the course,
each of the students presents his/her paper, followed by the peer review. Active participation during the seminar is required.

Suggested literature (will be updated later)

Ardron, Jeff A. (2018), Transparency in the operations of the International Seabed Authority. An initial assessment. Marine Policy. 95 (2018), pp. 324-331

Arts, Bas and Jan van Tatenhove (2005), Policy and Power. A Conceptual framework between the ‘old’ and ‘new’ policy idioms, Policy Sciences 37 (3-4), pp 339-356

Bailey, M., Bush, S. R., Miller, A., & Kochen, M. (2016). The role of traceability in transforming seafood governance in the global South. Current Opinion in Environmental Sustainability, 18, 25-32.

Dreyer, Marion, Magnus Boström & Anna Maria Jönsson (2014), Participatory Deliberation, Risk Governance and Management of the Marine Region in the European Union. Journal of Environmental Policy & Planning. 16:4, 497-515

Flannery, W., Ellis, G., Nursey-Bray, M., van Tatenhove, J. P. M., Kelly, C., Coffen-Smout, S., … O’Hagan, A. M. (2016). Exploring the winners and losers of marine environmental governance/Marine spatial planning: Cui bono ?/“More than fishy business”: epistemology, integration and conflict in marine spatial planning/Marine spatial planning: power and scaping/Surely not all. Planning Theory & Practice, 17(1), 121–151.

Smits, C.C.A.; Tatenhove, J. van; Leeuwen, J. van (2014), Authority in Arctic governance: changing spheres of authority in Greenlandic offshore oil and gas developments, International Environmental Agreements: Politics, Law and Economics 14(4), p.329-348

Van Tatenhove, Jan (2016), The Environmental State at Sea, Environmental Politics, 25 (1), pp. 160-179

Van Tatenhove, Jan P.M. (2017), Transboundary Marine Spatial Planning: a reflexive marine governance experiment? Journal of Environmental Policy and Planning. 19(6), 783-794

Organizer: Jan van Tatenhove tatenhove@plan.aau.dk

Lecturers: Jan van Tatenhove

ECTS: 3

Time: 30, 31 October and 1 November

Place: Aalborg University

City: 9000 Aalborg

Number of seats: 15

Deadline: 9 October 2019


Important information concerning PhD courses: We have over some time experienced problems with no-show for both project and general courses. It has now reached a point where we are forced to take action. Therefore, the Doctoral School has decided to introduce a no-show fee of DKK 5,000 for each course where the student does not show up. Cancellations are accepted no later than 2 weeks before start of the course. Registered illness is of course an acceptable reason for not showing up on those days. Furthermore, all courses open for registration approximately three months before start. This can hopefully also provide new students a chance to register for courses during the year. We look forward to your registrations.
Welcome to Institutions and Public Regulation - Options for Planning and Managing Technological Innovation for Smart Energy Systems

Description: A “business-as-usual” energy scenario may be changed into a scenario based on renewable energy and flexibility. Going towards 100% renewable energy systems requires Smart energy systems. But what are the demands of institutions, organisations, and public regulation on the technological trajectory of this change?

The aim of this course is to enable the PhD researcher to analyse the interplay between technological innovation and the institutional/regulatory framework in which it is embedded. The PhD course focuses on the energy sector, but its content is also applicable to other institutional and regulatory frameworks where radical technological changes are investigated.

The objective is for you to use the content as an inspiration for an article or for your dissertation.

The course enables you to use cases for examining institutions and public regulation and raises an awareness of different innovation paths. Initially, you will be introduced to theories of markets, state, public regulation, and innovation, and to methodologies to research the mechanisms within these areas. Cases are presented which may illustrate that technological trajectories are closely linked to different institutional and regulatory models and actors.

Potential case themes include: Privatisation and liberalisation programmes, public-private partnerships, EU renewable energy policy, transportation policy, CO2 trading schemes, green certificates, bottom-up and top-down technological innovation, strategic energy planning and other.

Organizers: Brian Vad Mathiesen bvm@plan.aau.dk

Lecturers: Brian Vad Mathiesen

ECTS: 2,5

Time: 10-12 December 2019

Place: AAU CPH, A. C. Meyers Vænge 15, room ACM15 2.0.004, ground floor building A

City: 2450 Copenhagen

Number of seats: 15 enrolled participants.

Deadline: Still few available seats: If interested in participating, please contact Helene Ulrich, helene@plan.aau.dk


Important information concerning PhD courses: We have over some time experienced problems with no-show for both project and general courses. It has now reached a point where we are forced to take action. Therefore, the Doctoral School has decided to introduce a no-show fee of DKK 5,000 for each course where the student does not show up. Cancellations are accepted no later than 2 weeks before start of the course. Registered illness is of course an acceptable reason for not showing up on those days. Furthermore, all courses open for registration approximately three months before start. This can hopefully also provide new students a chance to register for courses during the year. We look forward to your registrations.
Welcome to Transitioning to a low carbon future: the changing roles of households, utilities and buildings in the energy system

Description: 

Transition to a low-carbon future calls for lowering energy demand and an increased use of intermittent energy sources such as wind and solar power. Buildings account for roughly 40% of all energy use (for heating-cooling) and have, therefore, a prominent role in this transition. The question is how? E.g. energy savings in buildings may be balanced by related energy systems’ initiatives; building technologies can be related to specific local infrastructures; and if buildings can be used to store energy they may be able to deliver flexibility services. Buildings can thus serve as distributed system generators, and improvements in building design can furthermore contribute substantially to energy savings. Realizing these potentials calls for technical and organizational innovations as well as a greater understanding of the residents’ social practices, i.e. for new knowledge of the changing relationships between energy providers and households and of the roles different buildings technologies can play in this.

The aim of the course is to introduce PhD students to analytical perspectives that address different facets of considering buildings as part of the energy system, e.g. regarding developments in building technologies, utility operation and changing business models, and the role of residential practices. The course provides insights into technical, organizational and practice theories. The idea is to encourage PhD students to engage with different analytical perspectives in an interdisciplinary fashion.

The course program includes dialogue lectures, PhD presentations, and dialogue sessions where students will receive feedback on their presentations and projects from all participants.

Organizer: Kirsten Gram-Hanssen, SBI kgh@sbi.aau.dk

Lecturers: Kirsten Gram-Hanssen, Per Heiselberg (civil), Susse Georg (Plan)

ECTS: 1,5

Time: 20-21 November 2019

Place: Aalborg University, Copenhagen, Frederikskaj 10, Building D, 3rd floor, room 3.160

City: 2450 Copenhagen

Number of seats: 20

Deadline: 1 November 2019


Important information concerning PhD courses: We have over some time experienced problems with no-show for both project and general courses. It has now reached a point where we are forced to take action. Therefore, the Doctoral School has decided to introduce a no-show fee of DKK 5,000 for each course where the student does not show up. Cancellations are accepted no later than 2 weeks before start of the course. Registered illness is of course an acceptable reason for not showing up on those days. Furthermore, all courses open for registration approximately three months before start. This can hopefully also provide new students a chance to register for courses during the year. We look forward to your registrations.
Welcome to Digital transformation – business models and ecosystems

Description: The course is concerned with the processes of digital transformation including the transformation of businesses as well as governmental institutions. Digital transformation has become a catch-all concept and the course aims at situating this concept in relation to examples of concrete developments of the transformations within industry and government relating to the digitalization of work processes and services provided.

The course combines an examination of technology aspects of digital transformation as well as market and business aspects and policy and regulatory initiatives affecting digitalization processes. This implies that the network infrastructures, the management and processing of data, and the digital services and applications made available will be part of the course topics as well as an examination of business processes and services including business models and ecosystems. Also, policy initiatives and regulatory measures will be discussed including EU policies in the area and Danish policy initiatives and activities.

The overall approach of the course is based on institutional analysis, facilitating discussions comprising the purposes for which technologies are used, the business and organizational set-up and policy and regulatory framework for the processes of digital transformation. The course accommodates PhD students working with digital transformation from various angles with a primary focus on technology developments, business and social developments or policy oriented developments.

The topics that will be examined in the course include the following:

* Communications infrastructures including new mobile and wireless technologies

* IoT – sensors and actuators

* Edge and cloud computing

* Industry 4.0

* Digitalization for servitization

* APIs for public data

* Business models and ecosystems

* Smart cities

* E-government

* Policy initiatives and regulations

* Privacy issues and privacy regulation

Organizer: Anders Henten henten@cmi.aau.dk and Reza Tadayoni reza@cmi.aau.dk
Lecturers: Morten Falch, Sokol Kosta, Reza Tadayoni, Anders Henten
ECTS: 3

Time: Course start at 9 am on 20 November, course end at 12 noon on 22 November

Place: AAU Copenhagen, A. C. Meyers Vænge 15, Building A, first floor, room 2.1.043

City: 2450 Copenhagen

Number of seats: 20

Deadline: October 31st 2019

Important information concerning PhD courses: We have over some time experienced problems with no-show for both project and general courses. It has now reached a point where we are forced to take action. Therefore, the Doctoral School has decided to introduce a no-show fee of DKK 5,000 for each course where the student does not show up. Cancellations are accepted no later than 2 weeks before start of the course. Registered illness is of course an acceptable reason for not showing up on those days. Furthermore, all courses open for registration approximately three months before start. This can hopefully also provide new students a chance to register for courses during the year. We look forward to your registrations.
Welcome to Potentials and challenges of circular economy as sustainability strategy in businesses and cities

Description: 

It is increasingly acknowledged that the linear ‘take-make-dispose’ economic model is reaching its limits, and initiatives to develop alternative economic models are emerging. Circular economy is currently getting a lot of attention, because it promises an industrial system that is restorative by design. Both businesses and cities are developing circular economy strategies.

However, circular economy is not without shortcomings as strategy for sustainable development. It is risky promoting a circular economy, where focus merely is on closing existing material flows and not trying to understand the dynamics of the present linear economy by questioning why we produce what, the challenge to closing material flows from the globalized, outsourced cheap production, and when and why products lose value to their users and become waste.


The course introduces potentials and challenges to circular economy from a business perspective and from an urban perspective. Theoretically, the course integrates theories about product chains, value chains, social practices, user-oriented innovation and governance.


Three types of re-design processes are discussed, which are necessary to consider when developing circular economy business models within specific institutional and regulatory contexts: 1) re-designs of products and services based on considerations about necessary changes in roles of products, users, service, infrastructure, etc. 2) re-designing value chains both up-stream and down-stream and 3) internal organizational redesign of the business organization in order to integrate environmental concerns in product and strategy development.

From an urban perspective, different roles in developing and supporting circular economy are introduced: 1) Public planning, 2) Public infrastructures, 3) Public procurement, 4) Public building and construction, 5) Local business development.

Organizers: Arne Remmen ar@plan.aau.dk and Michael Søgaard Jørgensen msjo@plan.aau.dk

Lecturers: Arne Remmen, AAU; Michael Søgaard Jørgensen AAU

ECTS: 5

Time: 27-29 November 2019. The course start at 10 am on 27/11 and ends at 4 pm on 29/11.

Place: Aalborg University; Copenhagen campus, A. C. Meyers Vænge 15, room ACM15, building A, room 2.2.040A

City: 2450 Copenhagen

Number of seats: 25

Deadline: 6 November 2019


Important information concerning PhD courses: We have over some time experienced problems with no-show for both project and general courses. It has now reached a point where we are forced to take action. Therefore, the Doctoral School has decided to introduce a no-show fee of DKK 5,000 for each course where the student does not show up. Cancellations are accepted no later than 2 weeks before start of the course. Registered illness is of course an acceptable reason for not showing up on those days. Furthermore, all courses open for registration approximately three months before start. This can hopefully also provide new students a chance to register for courses during the year. We look forward to your registrations.
Welcome to Design and Innovation Processes and their Staging

Description: While innovation and design are increasingly expected to answer to a broad variety of concerns and depending on the incorporation of knowledge from a diversity of sources, questions are raised as to what kinds of sources, and how they are incorporated in processes of design and innovation. As innovative challenges and conditions are changing with increasing pace these questions cannot just be solved through a singular choice of organization or established guidelines for selecting innovative ideas. Issues of how to stage the scene and circumstances and how to facilitate processes and the involvement of diverse actors in design as well as innovation have increasingly come into focus. Successful design and innovation are seen as the outcome of interactions within a broader network spanning across diverse organizational and societal boundaries and institutions. There is a need to address the design and navigation of new fora and spaces for development where existing frames of understandings may be challenged and new patterns for interactions emerge.

The course takes its departure in the well-described dilemmas between incremental but often path dependent innovative processes within established networks and the quest for the development and design of new innovative, disruptive or breakthrough ideas, product and services facilitated through new networked relations. A range of theories, cases and approaches concerned with the framing, designing and staging of innovative processes, from linear sequential models to complex, dynamic

networks of innovation are treated and related to the current work of the participants.

During the course, a dialogue is created between the participants’ projects and a diversity of understandings of the management and staging of design and innovation from organization, institutional theory and sociology of innovation. The idea is to direct inquiry and to stimulate theoretical insights and empirical approaches in the field of design and innovation. The course introduces concepts, which help render relevant phenomena and issues (relationships, dynamics, consequences) in the participants’ projects visible and open to investigation, analysis as well as creative inquiry and exploration. This would, in turn, also help in delineating hypotheses of relevance to the investigation of innovative processes and their staging, and in proposing new directions for research in the field.

The program will cover the following themes:

Challenges in management of innovation and the staging of design and innovative processes
Innovation and design as heterogeneous processes of interaction involving actors, artefacts and knowledge
Innovation and design as journeys characterized by uncertainty, ambiguity and complexity
Innovation between rational analytical, interpretive and performative processes
Innovation and design as exploitation and exploration
Innovation as networking, brokering and collaboration in and between organizations
From planning and calculation to social learning and translation of interests
‘Co-creation’ and ‘path creation’ as heterogeneous network building,
Staging and navigation of temporary spaces for innovation across knowledge boundaries
Part 1 (Takes place at AAU Aalborg):
The first part of the course provides insight and understanding of how theory and practice in innovation and design as process has evolved. Insight is achieved through an overview of classics and recent movements in innovation research, a review of core innovation concepts and fields, as well as dialogue with industrial professionals from organizations leading innovation and design.

Part 2 (Takes place at AAU Copenhagen):
The second part provides insight in innovation and design and their staging based on the latest socio-material approaches to innovation and design. These traditions have emerged as an attempt to develop concepts and approaches enabling to search for and identify key processes and dynamics that might become central to the design of innovation and their staging.

Form

The students should be familiar with basic understandings of innovative processes from innovation process theory and/or science and technology studies (the STS field) on an academic master level.

The program includes teacher presentations, student presentations, professional experiences and company talks as well as dialogue sessions where students will receive feedback on their presentations and projects from fellow students as well as teachers.

As a preparation for the first assembly, participants should prepare a presentation of a problem/solution from their research, which they want to analyze from an innovation process perspective. The presentation can focus on a case and/or a challenging perspective (oral supported with ppt) within the theme of the course (It is important to describe how innovation processes could be a relevant perspective for your activities in order to provide a professional and empirical background for your own reflexive learning.)

Between the first and second assembly participants write a 5-10 pages analysis bringing theory to bear on selected case material of their own choice. These assignments are basis for evaluation and approval of participation. In addition, participants will be asked to fill in a formal evaluation scheme.

Organizer: Associate Professor Søren Kerndrup, soeren@plan.aau.dk and professor Christian Clausen chcl@plan.aau.dk

Lecturers: Professor Peter Karnøe, AAU, BDO; associate professor Søren Kerndrup, AAU, SIP, asssociate professor Astrid Heidemann Lassen, AAU, CIP; Ole Tangsgaard, rinnovation Consult. associate professor Hanne Lindegaard, assistant professor Signe Pedersen and professor Christian Clausen, AAU, BDO.
ECTS: 5

Time and place:
Part 1: 26-27 September 2019 - Rendsburggade 14, 9000 Aalborg, room Rdb14 4.307

Part 2: 4-6 December 2019 - A.C. Meyers Vænge 15, Building A, 1st floor, room 2.1.043, 2450 Copenhagen

City: Aalborg and Copenhagen

Number of seats: 20

Deadline: 5 September 2019

Important information concerning PhD courses: We have over some time experienced problems with no-show for both project and general courses. It has now reached a point where we are forced to take action. Therefore, the Doctoral School has decided to introduce a no-show fee of DKK 5,000 for each course where the student does not show up. Cancellations are accepted no later than 2 weeks before start of the course. Registered illness is of course an acceptable reason for not showing up on those days. Furthermore, all courses open for registration approximately three months before start. This can hopefully also provide new students a chance to register for courses during the year. We look forward to your registrations.
Welcome to Digital media – a radical change from dedicated broadcast to IP based streaming

Description:The course is concerned with the development of the audio/visual media sector regarding distribution and content platforms, from technology, market and policy perspectives.

Media landscapes have gone through major changes throughout the history and have been undergoing fundamental changes in recent years and will continue to do so in the near future. The changes have intensified in the last two decades starting with the digitalization of broadcast infrastructures and presently with the development of streaming platforms and the development of broadband infrastructures and cloud platforms that most likely will result in the end of dedicated infrastructures for media distributions. Time shifting, place shifting, video / audio on demand, and global networks for distribution of audiovisual content are just a few examples of these changes. The implications are, e.g., the transformation of the traditional media distribution and delivery platforms and content markets, as well as a disruption of home video markets and the record / music industry. Furthermore, there are major changes in the usage and consumption behaviour connected with terminal devices and the combination of audiovisual applications and services with social networking applications.

These changes are driven by the interplay between technological developments, market developments and new business models and the policy and regulatory environment. The aim of this course is to discuss the driving forces for such changes and to examine the implications for the markets, industries, users and the technological development. The course takes it basic point of departure in discussing the materiality of the media. The end of dedicated infrastructures does not mean that the material basis for media production and consumption ‘dematerializes’. It means that it changes with implications for media production, consumption and industrial structures.

The course will address the following topics:

Media convergence
New business models
The materiality of new media
Standardization processes
Dedicated TV and radio infrastructures - the current status and future perspectives
Linear and nonlinear audio-visual services
IP based Over the Top (OTT) and hybrid platforms
Development of fixed and mobile broadband infrastructures, including LTE and 5G as platform for audio visual services
Market developments and usage
Silo based versus open media platforms


Organizer: Reza Tadayoni reza@cmi.aau.dk and Anders Henten henten@plan.aau.dk

Lecturers: Jannick Sørensen, Knud Erik Skouby, Anders Henten, Reza Tadayoni

ECTS: 2

Time: 15-16 May 2019

Place: AAU CPH, A.C. Meyers Vænge 15, 3. floor, room ACM15 3.084

City: 2450 Copenhagen

Number of seats: 20

Deadline: 24 April 2019

Important information concerning PhD courses: We have over some time experienced problems with no-show for both project and general courses. It has now reached a point where we are forced to take action. Therefore, the Doctoral School has decided to introduce a no-show fee of DKK 5,000 for each course where the student does not show up. Cancellations are accepted no later than 2 weeks before start of the course. Registered illness is of course an acceptable reason for not showing up on those days. Furthermore, all courses open for registration approximately three months before start. This can hopefully also provide new students a chance to register for courses during the year. We look forward to your registrations.

Welcome to Theories of Sustainable Transitions

Description.This PhD course is intended for students conducting research related to analysis, design and innovation processes for the needed transformations to achieve sustainability goals. The teachers of the course will offer advanced discussion in theories of transitions and will illustrate their theoretical work through case studies conducted in various places including Holland, Denmark, the United Kingdom, Brazil and Argentina. These case studies range from local community based initiatives, to city projects to country and regional programs for sustainability. International collaboration efforts will also be discussed.

Objectives

At the end of this course the students would be able to:

Explain how their own project and ideas relate to state of the art discussions in transitions theories (MLP; TIS; AOD; Practice Theory)
Explain the principal issues involved in innovations for sustainable transitions.
Describe the main challenges and efforts to sustainable transitions in various countries.
Describe the main challenges and efforts to sustainable transitions in urban settings analysing examples from Europe.
Describe the main governance challenges and advancements in relation to governance theories to achieve sustainable transitions.
Lecturers

Activity timeline:

Students should:

Enrol in the course by 31 March 2019 at https://phd.moodle.aau.dk/login/
Deliver a one-page description of their project by 1 of April 2019. Please be clear about what are the questions of your research project and in what ways you imagine that the transitions theories might be supportive.
Deliver by the 1st of May 2019 a three-page analysis of how their project relates to the course. In what ways does the literature help the project? In what ways does the project serves as a basis to criticize the literature?
Make a presentation during the course in order to get feedback from the teachers. The aim of the presentation is that students test their ideas of how the theories of transitions might be supportive of their project. (This is optional but strongly recommended)
Deliver by the 30th of July 2019 a 10 page paper with the full elaboration of their ideas. Ideally this exercise should support the students’ progress in their PhD either by advancing her state of the art review, a chapter, an article or any kind of structured idea.
In short:

Deadline for enrolment: 31 March 2019

Deadline for project paper: 1 of April 2019

Preparatory reading and writing: 1 April – 1 May 2019

Deadline for preliminary analysis: 1 May 2019

Meetings: 13-15 May (3 full days)

Delivery of a 10 page paper: 30 July 2019

Readings

Objective



At the end of this course the students will be able to:



Readings



This reading list is recommended. Students are free to replace these readings with others they might consider more pertinent. The objective however is that students should mature their theoretical take on their project through the course.



Explain how their own project and ideas relate to state of the art discussions in transitions theories (MLP; TIS; AOD)



Jørgensen, U. (2012). Mapping and navigating transitions—The multi-level perspective compared with arenas of development. Research Policy.



MARKARD, J. & TRUFFER, B. 2008. Technological innovation systems and the multi-level perspective: Towards an integrated framework. Research Policy, 37, 596-615.

GEELS, F. W., HEKKERT, M. P. & JACOBSSON, S. 2008. The dynamics of sustainable innovation journeys. Technology Analysis & Strategic Management, 20, 521-536.

Explain the principal issues involved in innovations for sustainable transitions.



Smith, A. (2007) Translating sustainabilities between green niches and socio-technical regimes, Technology Analysis & Strategic Management, 19, 4: 427-450

Marin, A. and M. Vila Seoane (2013). “A path breaking niche: The Cooperative COOPSOL Ltda.”. Report for the IDRC funded project “Opening up Natural Resource-Based Industries for Innovation: Exploring New Pathways for Development in Latin America”.

Smith, A. and R. Raven (2012) What is protective space? Reconsidering niches in transitions to sustainability, Research Policy 41: 1025-1036.

Smith, A., Kern, F, Raven, R. and B. Verhees (2013 – in press) Spaces for sustainable innovation: solar photovoltaic electricity in the UK, Technological Forecasting & Social Change



Describe the main challenges and efforts to sustainable transitions in Brazil and Argentina.



Smith, A., Fressoli, M. and H. Thomas (2012 – accepted) Grassroots innovation movements: challenges and contributions, Journal of Cleaner Production

Marin, A. (2012): Putting natural resources industries to work for sustainable development in Latin America. Poverty in Focus, Nro 24, International Policy Centre for Inclusive Growth, p: 35-37.

Marin, A., L. Stubrin and P. Van Zwanenberg (2013). “ Developing capabilities in the seed industry: which direction to follow? .” Report for the IDRC funded project “Opening up Natural Resource-Based Industries for Innovation: Exploring New Pathways for Development in Latin America”.

Galvão, A., Juruá, M. and L. Esteves (2012). “The Amazons and the Use of its Biodiversity”. Report for the IDRC funded project “Opening up Natural Resource-Based Industries for Innovation: Exploring New Pathways for Development in Latin America”.



Describe the main challenges and efforts to sustainable transitions in urban settings analysing examples from Europe and Latin America.



Bulkeley, Harriet, and Michele Betsill. "Rethinking sustainable cities: multilevel governance and the 'urban'politics of climate change." Environmental Politics 14.1 (2005): 42-63.

Murphy, J and A Smith (2013 – in press) Understanding transition-periphery dynamics: renewable energy in the Highlands and Islands of Scotland, Environment and Planning A

Lissandrello, E. and Grin, J. (2011) Reflexive Planning as Design and Work: Lessons from the Port of Amsterdam. Planning Theory and Practice

Describe the main governance challenges and advancements in relation to governance theories to achieve sustainable transitions.



Voβ, J-P., Smith, A. And J. Grin (2009) Designing long-term policy: re-thinking transition management Policy Sciences 42, 4: 275-302

Smith, A. and A.Stirling (2010) The politics of social-ecological resilience and sustainable socio-technical transitions Ecology & Society 15, 1: online http://www.ecologyandsociety.org/vol15/iss1/art11/

Smith, A. and F. Kern (2009) The transitions storyline in Dutch environmental policy Environmental Politics, 18, 1: 78-98

Lissandrello, E. and Sterrenberg, L. (forthcoming) Transitions in Dutch Politics of Planning



Organizer: Andrés Valderrama afvp@plan.aau.dk and Ulrik Jørgensen uljo@plan.aau.dk

Lecturers: Professor Rob Raven (University of Utrecht); the organizers; and the following from DIST: Inge Røpke, Jens Stissing Jensen, Charlotte Louise Jensen, Michael Søgaard Jørgensen.

ECTS: 5

Time: May 13-15 2019

Place: AAU CPH, A.C. Meyers Vænge 15, 3. floor, room ACM15 3.084A

City: 2450 Copenhagen

Number of seats: 15

Deadline: April 22nd 2019

Important information concerning PhD courses: We have over some time experienced problems with no-show for both project and general courses. It has now reached a point where we are forced to take action. Therefore, the Doctoral School has decided to introduce a no-show fee of DKK 5,000 for each course where the student does not show up. Cancellations are accepted no later than 2 weeks before start of the course. Registered illness is of course an acceptable reason for not showing up on those days. Furthermore, all courses open for registration approximately three months before start. This can hopefully also provide new students a chance to register for courses during the year. We look forward to your registrations.

Organizers

The course is organized by The Technical Doctoral School of IT and Design, Aalborg University and Danish Centre for Environmental Assessment (DCEA) www.DCEA.dk, in collaboration with the International Life Cycle Academy (ILCA) www.ILCA.es

Description The course aims at strengthening skills in life cycle inventory analysis. The course targets the development of advanced competences in LCA by applying the problem based-learning (PBL) teaching model that focuses on learning by doing and reflection. The course activities will include intensive group work, problem defining and solving applied to real-word cases, practical exercises, and discussion sessions or workshops. The target audience of the course is academics (PhDs, postdoc, other) or professionals who already have basic experience with LCA and intend to bring their LCA competences to an advanced level. Basic experience means for example having carried out simple LCAs before or having elementary knowledge of LCA theory. The course content is organized in three modules (main teacher in parenthesis).

Module 1. Intro to advanced LCA (Massimo Pizzol)                In this hands-on module students will learn the how to use the software Brightway2 that is specific for LCA research. Topics covered: Computational structure of LCA. Uncertainty analysis with stochastic error propagation (Monte Carlo) and statistical testing of LCA results. LCA reproducibility and data sharing. The module includes exercises.

Module 2. Consequential LCA (Bo Weidema)                           Students will learn the fundamentals of Consequential LCA. Topics covered: Introduction to attributional and consequential models. Algorithms for performing consequential LCA in the definition of functional unit, consumption mix, and identification of determining and dependent co-products. Modelling of indirect Land Use Changes (iLUC). Communicating consequential models. The module includes exercises.

Module 3. Input output LCA (Jannick Schmidt)                        Students will learn the fundamentals of Input-Output modelling. Topics covered: supply-use tables, multi-regional models and trade linking. Integrating process LCA and IO-analysis via hybrid LCA, tiered and embedded. Expanding the IO-matrix to include the natural, social and economic environment. The module includes exercises.

Preliminary programme

Thu 9 May

(08:00-16:00).

Fri 10 May

(08:00-16:00).

Sat 11 May

Sun 12 May

Mon 13 May

(08:00-16:00).

Tue 14 May

(08:00-16:00).

Wed 15 May

(08:00-16:00).

Thu 16 May

(08:00-16:00).

Module 1 LCA intro

Module 1 LCA intro

Break

Break

Module 2

Conseq LCA

Module 2 Conseq LCA

Module 3 IO LCA

Module 3

IO LCA

 

ECTS Distribution

The five ECTS credits of the course are divided roughly in this way:

 

Activity

Hours

ECTS

Lectures and group work in class

48

1.7

Readings

35

1.3

Group work prior to course

20

0.7

Group work after course

35

1.3

Total

138

5.0

*One ECTS credit is equivalent to 27.5 hours of work

 

Activities: Includes attending to the lectures and performing exercises in class.

Readings: Approx. 100 pages of scientific articles and reports that are provided to the students, plus python tutorials.

Group work: students work in groups (max 5 people). Each group will work on a case study and apply the knowledge of the course on the case study.

EXAMPLE, a group works on an LCA of a product and does:

  • prior to the course: choice of product and data mining, getting base knowledge and data to describe the product system.
  • during the course (exercises in class): consequential inventory with matrix format, IO LCA inventory, inclusion of iLUC, inclusion of social impacts, etc.
  • after the course: organize the material and prepare a portfolio/article where all the techniques are presented for the case study.

Eventually, all portfolios are made available. Each student will thus get the info on five different cases. Students should be able to organize themselves using online tools (skype, dropbox etc) to collaborate in group remotely prior and after the course.

 

Registration and info               Please apply via mail to the course organizer Massimo Pizzol (massimo@plan.aau.dk). You must provide the following information in the email: Full name / Profession (PhD student, postdoc, consultant…) / Institution name / Address / email address / Phone nr / your research field or Phd topic / your experience with LCA

Prices

Attendee

Price*

PhD students affiliated to a Danish University

Free

PhD students not affiliated to a Danish University

3.000 DKK (400 EUR)

Academics   (e.g. postdoc and professors)

6.000   DKK (800   EUR)

Professionals (consultancy, industry, etc.)

15.000 DKK (2000 EUR)

* Prices do not cover meals, accommodation, and social dinner

Payment: Please find link to payment here  (payment no later than 8 April).

Time: May 9-16, 2019

Place: Aalborg University, Rendsburggade 14, room no 3.465

City: 9000  Aalborg

Number of seats: 25

Registration deadline: April 1, 2019

Important information concerning PhD courses:  We have over some time experienced problems with no-show for both project and general courses. It has now reached a point where we are forced to take action. Therefore, the Doctoral School has decided to introduce a no-show fee of DKK 5,000 for each course where the student does not show up. Cancellations are accepted no later than 2 weeks before start of the course. Registered illness is of course an acceptable reason for not showing up on those days. Furthermore, all courses open for registration approximately three months before start. This can hopefully also provide new students a chance to register for courses during the year. We look forward to your registrations

Welcome to Advanced Energy System Analysis on the EnergyPLAN model

Description: The PhD course gives an introduction to advanced energy system analysis using the EnergyPLAN computer model. After the course the participants are expected to be able to understand methodologies of advanced energy system analysis and to be able to use the EnergyPLAN computer model as a tool in making energy system analyses.

The course is conducted as a combination of lectures and computer workshops of a total of 4 days (32 hours) and assignments of a total of 6-7 days (52 hours). Results of assignments will be presented by the participants.

The course start with an introduction to the model (installation, using, constructing new data sets) and proceeds to focus on the use of the model in

sustainable cities and communities
technical analyses of large-scale integration of wind.
analyses of exchange with external electricity markets
combinations of different renewable energy technologies.
designing flexible energy systems using flexible technologies such as heat pumps, hydrogen storage, pumped storage etc.
district heating systems versus individual houses and zero energy buildings
designing energy systems based on multiple criteria
Course fee: 750 DKK (100 EUR) for PhD students. Others pay 7500 DKK. All participants must cover own costs for travel and accommodation.

In order to sign up you must pay (no later than 23 April) using the following link: https://www.erap.aau.dk/event/index.php/ESAotEPM2019

Organizer: Henrik Lund lund@plan.aau.dk

Lecturers: Poul Alberg Østergaard , Henrik Lund, Jakob Zinck Thellufsen, Younes Noorollahi & Brian Vad Mathiesen

ECTS: 3

Time: May 6-8 2019 and May 20-22 2019

Place: AAU, Rendsburggade 14, 9000 Aalborg, Room Rdb14 3.465

City: Aalborg

Number of seats: 30

Deadline: April 15th 2019

Important information concerning PhD courses: We have over some time experienced problems with no-show for both project and general courses. It has now reached a point where we are forced to take action. Therefore, the Doctoral School has decided to introduce a no-show fee of DKK 5,000 for each course where the student does not show up. Cancellations are accepted no later than 2 weeks before start of the course. Registered illness is of course an acceptable reason for not showing up on those days. Furthermore, all courses open for registration approximately three months before start. This can hopefully also provide new students a chance to register for courses during the year. We look forward to your registrations.
Welcome to Managing Complexity in Projects

Description: Projects are a form of enterprise where individuals or teams engage in the planning and execution of activities in order to reach specific goals/aim. Today projects are increasingly important because organizations continually need to relate to and engage in change processes to adapt to and compete in changing conditions. Project organization has an increasingly important role in all forms of organizations both private, public, NGO etc.
Projects as a form of work practice has consequences for both the work itself and for the products of the work process therefore it is important for everyone engaged in planning, design, development etc. to understand what projects are and how the project organization and process influences the product of a project.

Further projects today can often be characterised as complex. That is that understandings, processes and goals might be more or less uncertain and ambiguous throughout the project process and therefore resembling research processes more than standardized sequential or stage gate processes reflected in classic project management thinking. The complexities are evident both in internal and external conditions of the projects and on many levels of organization and planning. Challenges are related to for example learning, knowledge production and sharing, cooperation, power, ethical aspects etc.

Complexity in projects demands tailored understandings, techniques and processes for understanding and handling them. Understanding and handling the conditions/contexts of complex projects, therefore, is one of

the key competences both for project managers but also for anyone participating in complex projects.

In understanding and handling complex projects new perspectives and forms of interaction are needed. The new perspectives for understanding complexity are e.g. sense making and socio-material approaches. New forms of interaction are e.g. Agile project management methods and participatory approaches.

In this course we look practically and theoretically on project planning and management. You will be introduced to different approaches of project management and planning.



The program will cover the following themes:

New Theoretical perspectives of understanding and handling complexity (sense-making, sociomaterial and practice perspective)
New agile, lean and design perspectives on managing uncertainty, ambiguity and complexity in projects
New participatory perspectives on projects to unlock the potentials of actors and stakeholders
Co-creation, engagement and empowerment. heterogeneous stakeholders in a sociomaterial perspective
Projects as heterogeneous processes of interaction involving actors, artefacts and knowledge
Staging and navigation of collaborative spaces across knowledge boundaries
Understanding of different types of projects and the implication for management and planning activities
Networking and brokering in and between projects
Power and sense-making in projects
Challenges in managing complex projects
The role of learning and knowledge and power in projects


Form: The students should be familiar with basic understanding and development of projects, organisation and technology and/or science and technology studies (the STS field) on an academic master level.

The program includes teacher presentations, student presentations, company talks, workshops and dialogue sessions. The workshops and dialogue sessions is set up in order to stimulate the active engagement of the students and will be used as spaces where 1)students will receive feedback on their presentations and projects from fellow students as well as teachers and “) spaces where the students are engaged in interactive

games where they develop their skills to use participatory methods and tools in practice

As a preparation for the first assembly, participants should prepare a presentation of a problem/solution from their research, which they want to analyse from a complex project perspective. The presentation can focus on a case and/or a challenging perspective (oral supported with ppt) within the theme of the course.

Between the first and second assembly participants write a 5-10 pages analysis bringing theory to bear on selected case material of their own choice. These assignments are basis for evaluation and approval of participation.

In addition, participants will be asked to contribute to the activities through small task in order to stimulate the interactive learning processes

Organizer: Associate Professor Søren Kerndrup, soeren@plan.aau.dk, and associate professor Lone Stub Pedersen, lonep@plan.aau.dk
Lecturers: Professor Christian Claussen, Rune Højsholt, Grundfoss A/S, Jonas Moll, Rehfelt medical and Copenhagen university,Professor Lars Bo Henriksen.Associate professor Lone Stub Pedersen, Associate Professor Søren Kerndrup, Associate Professor Maurizio Teli
ECTS: 5

Time and place:
Part 1: 6-7 June 2019; Rendsburggade 14, 9000 Aalborg, room Rdb14 3.463
Part 2: 26-28 August 2019; Rendsburggade 14, 9000 Aalborg, room Rdb14 3.329

Number of seats: 20

Deadline: 16 May 2019

Important information concerning PhD courses: We have over some time experienced problems with no-show for both project and general courses. It has now reached a point where we are forced to take action. Therefore, the Doctoral School has decided to introduce a no-show fee of DKK 5,000 for each course where the student does not show up. Cancellations are accepted no later than 2 weeks before start of the course. Registered illness is of course an acceptable reason for not showing up on those days. Furthermore, all courses open for registration approximately three months before start. This can hopefully also provide new students a chance to register for courses during the year. We look forward to your registrations.

CANCELLED

Welcome to Why and how to create participation in Research of Technology for Health


When

6-8 May 2019


Output

The course will benefit the PhD fellows to reach a clear understanding of why and how participation in research matters and how it can be facilitated specifically in research of technology.

Objective

The aim of this course is to raise theoretical and methodological awareness of why and how professionals, citizens and public in general can participate in research of technology.


The course will involve the following topics

- the value and challenges of participation in technology research
- methods for facilitating participation in technology research
- techniques for how to enhance participation, i.e. how researchers can collaborate with participants during research on technology


Activity timeline

April 1st: In order to ensure the planning of a participant centered course all students must, prior to the course write one page describing 1) your research questions, 2) the technology you are researching, 3) the context of your research, 4) in what way you imagine that participation is part of your research – this may include ambitions as well as challenges.


Friday April 26: Participants upload a written presentation of how their project relate to the course with elaboration of how the course literature help the research project e.g. in what way does the course literature support an understanding and approach for participation in the specific PhD study.



6-8 May: At the course lectures on theoretical and methodological aspects of participation in research of technology, will take place during morning hours. In the afternoon participants will give a presentation of their work and get feedback from at least 2 opponents. The oral presentation is an elaboration of the three-pages uploaded prior to the course,


Organizers and lecturers: Pernille Bertelsen pernille@plan.aau.dk , Anne Marie Kanstrup kanstrup@plan.aau.dk

ECTS: 3

Time: 6-8 May 2019

Place: AAU, Rendsburggade 14, room Rdb14 4.105

City: 9000 Aalborg

Number of seats: 20

Deadline: April 1st

Reading: TBA


Important information concerning PhD courses: We have over some time experienced problems with no-show for both project and general courses. It has now reached a point where we are forced to take action. Therefore, the Doctoral School has decided to introduce a no-show fee of DKK 5,000 for each course where the student does not show up. Cancellations are accepted no later than 2 weeks before start of the course. Registered illness is of course an acceptable reason for not showing up on those days. Furthermore, all courses open for registration approximately three months before start. This can hopefully also provide new students a chance to register for courses during the year. We look forward to your registrations.
Welcome to Python for Geospatial Analysis

Description: The PhD course Python for Geospatial Analysis will provide an introduction to Python with a focus on mapping, exploring, processing, and analysing geospatial information using Python. Participants will learn how tasks traditionally conducted in a desktop GIS system can be easily transferred to Python code and therefore made faster, more flexible, and completely reproducible, which is an aspect of increasing importance in many research fields. At the end of this course, participants will have a solid understanding of the capabilities of core Python modules for geospatial information such as fiona, geopandas, pysal, or rasterio and be able to apply them in their own research.

This course will focus on geospatial analysis in “pure” Python, i.e., automation of tasks in ArcGIS or QGIS with Python is out of scope for this course. However, participants looking to do this should be sufficiently proficient in Python after this course to accomplish these tasks on their own.

Day 1: General introduction to Python, mapping and explorative analysis of geographic information

Day 2: The Python stack for geospatial analysis

Day 3: Using geospatial web services from Python

Organization
The course will consist of 3 parts, which in combination will be worth 3 ECTS for the participants. Part 1 consists of introductory readings as well as setting up the software environment on the participants’ machine before we start our face-to-face sessions. This second part will consist of the three days in April where we will meet at AAU CPH. Each day will consist of more lecture-oriented content in the morning, and extensive hands-on exercises in the afternoon. On the last day of the meeting, a larger project will be

introduced which has to be completed and delivered by each participant as the third part of the course.

Prerequisites
While this course will introduce Python from scratch (i.e., no previous experience in Python is required), participants should have a basic understanding of programming principles, e.g. know what a variable, a function, or a loop is. Likewise, we do not expect participants to be GIS experts, but again, a basic understanding of geographic information concepts such as layers or vector/raster formats. Ideally, participants in this course would already be using GIS in some way for their research and be looking for ways to do this more efficiently.

Organizer: Carsten Kessler kessler@plan.aau.dk , Jamal Jokar Arsanjani jja@plan.aau.dk
Lecturer: Carsten Kessler, Jamal Jokar Arsanjani
ECTS: 3

Time: April 24-26 2019, course start every day at 9.00

Place: AAU CPH, A.C. Meyers Vænge 15, 3. floor, room ACM15 3.084A

City: 2450 Copenhagen

Number of seats: 20

Deadline: April 10, 2019

Important information concerning PhD courses: We have over some time experienced problems with no-show for both project and general courses. It has now reached a point where we are forced to take action. Therefore, the Doctoral School has decided to introduce a no-show fee of DKK 5,000 for each course where the student does not show up. Cancellations are accepted no later than 2 weeks before start of the course. Registered illness is of course an acceptable reason for not showing up on those days. Furthermore, all courses open for registration approximately three months before start. This can hopefully also provide new students a chance to register for courses during the year. We look forward to your registrations.