Welcome to PhD-seminar in health informatics at SHI (2018)

Description:
The seminar will be a great opportunity for PhD-students and other early-career research fellows student to engage in scientific discussions on health informatics issues; to gain new knowledge and inspiration and create network within a Scandinavian perspective.

We invite PhD-students and early-career research fellows to submit a paper addressed to the SHI -conference and following the template specified at the SHI webpage. The paper will be reviewed by experienced researchers – and each paper will receive at least two independent reviews.

The seminar will provide the PhD students with an opportunity to present a paper and have these papers and presentations discussed in much more detail concerning structure and content than sessions in the conference themselves allow. Senior researchers will participate as facilitators for the discussions.

The course is organized as a panel with presentations from the PhD-students and feed-back from senior researchers. It targets PhD-students who are interested in scientific discussion of health informatics issues in the Scandinavian countries.

 

The aim is to make the PhD students ready for making scientific contributions both in written and oral form in a scientific community with a special interest in health informatics issues in Scandinavia. 

The course is organized as a full day of presentations and discussions facilitated by experienced researchers. This approach creates the opportunity for the PhD students to strengthen their scientific voice and arguments for their applied methods and designs. The discussions contribute towards a positioning of the research in a larger scientific frame and give a more thorough understanding of the basis for the research. Having different positions from each panel member also creates an awareness of heterogeneous research approach to help to comprehend the interdisciplinary approaches that health informatics related research often face.    

Literature Papers submitted by peers 


Evaluation
PhD students are expected to submit a scientific paper covering a specific research study which is part of their PhD, to present their work and to be active during the session.  

Organizer: Associate Professor Louise Pape-Haugaard, email: lph@hst.aau.dk and Professor Ann Bygholm, email: ann@hum.aau.dk

ECTS: 1 – workload 30 hours

Time:  27/8-18 (10-18)

Place: Aalborg University, Rendsburggade 14, room Rdb14 3.463

City: 9000 Aalborg

Number of seats: 6-10

Deadline: 1 August 2018

Welcome to Managing Complexity in Projects


Description:

Projects are a form of enterprise where individuals or teams engage in the planning and execution of activities in order to reach specific goals/aim. Today projects are increasingly important because organizations continually need to relate to and engage in change processes to adapt to and compete in changing conditions. Project organization has an increasingly important role in all forms of organizations both private, public, NGO etc.

Projects as a form of work practice has consequences for both the work itself and for the products of the work process therefore it is important for everyone engaged in planning, design, development etc. to understand what projects are and how the project organization and process influences the product of a project.

Further projects today can often be characterized as complex. That is that understandings, processes and goals might be more or less uncertain and ambiguous throughout the project process and therefore resembling research processes more than standardized sequential or stage gate processes reflected in classic project management thinking. The complexities are evident both in internal and external conditions of the projects and on many levels of organization and planning. Challenges are related to for example learning, knowledge production and sharing, cooperation, power, ethical aspects etc.

Complexity in projects demands tailored understandings, techniques and processes for understanding and handling them. Understanding and handling the conditions/contexts of complex projects, therefore, is one of the key competences both for project managers but also for anyone participating in complex projects.

In understanding and handling complex projects new perspectives and forms of interaction are needed. The new perspectives for understanding complexity are e.g. sense making and socio-material approaches. New forms of interaction are e.g. Agile project management methods and participatory approaches.

In this course we look practically and theoretically on project planning and management. You will be introduced to different approaches of project management and planning.

 

The program will cover the following themes:

  • New Theoretical pererspectives of understanding and handling complexity (sense-making sociomaterial and practice perspective
  • Projects is seen as a journey characterised by uncertainty, ambiguity and complexity
  • Projects as heterogeneous processes of interaction involving actors, artefacts and knowledge
  • Understanding of different types of projects and the implication for management and planning activities
  • Identifying, stakeholders in socio-material perspective
  • Networking and brokering in and between projects
  • Knowledge and learning
  • Power and sense-making in projects
  • Challenges in managing complex projects
  • The role of learning and knowledge
  • Introduction to participatory perspectives on managing uncertainty, ambiguity and complexity

 

Form: The students should be familiar with basic understandings of planning, organizational change, technology construction and development and/or science and technology studies (the STS field) on an academic master level.

The program includes teacher presentations, student presentations, company talks, workshops and dialogue sessions. The workshops and dialogue sessions is set up in order to stimulate the active engagement of the students and will be used as spaces where 1)students will receive feedback on their presentations and projects from fellow students as well as teachers and “) spaces where the students are engaged in interactive games where they develop their skills to use participatory methods and tools in practice

As a preparation for the first assembly, participants should prepare a presentation of a problem/solution from their research, which they want to analyse from a complex project perspective. The presentation can focus on a case and/or a challenging perspective (oral supported with ppt) within the theme of the course. 

Between the first and second assembly participants write a 5-10 pages analysis bringing theory to bear on selected case material of their own choice. These assignments are basis for evaluation and approval of participation.

In addition, participants will be asked to contribute to the activities through small task in order to stimulate the interactive learning processes

Programme for May 7-8, 2018 

Location: Aalborg University, Rendsburggade 14, 9000 Aalborg. 

Teachers: Associate Professor Søren Kerndrup, Associate Professor Lone Stub Petersen, Rune Højsholt, Grundfos A/S, Jonas Moll, Rehfelt medical and Copenhagne university

  

Thursday, May 7, 9.00-17.45

Location: Aalborg University, Rendsburggade 14, 9000 Aalborg, room Rdb 14.2./3.329  

09.00: Registration, Coffee

09.30: Welcome and introduction to the course

Introduction to participants, teachers and program

Perspectives on project management approaches, Søren Kerndrup

10.15: Projects and complexity – What is the problemLone Stub Petersen & Søren Kerndrup                         

Dialogue and discussion

12.00: Lunch

13.00: New forms of management of projects – experiencies from industrial practice in Grundfos. Rune Højsholt, Grundfos A/S

Dialogue and discussion

15.30: Participant presentation of their PhD or other projects and prepared assignment 

Coffee break

16.45: Workshop: Challenges in managing complex projects.

17.45: End of day

 

Friday May 8, 9.00-16.00

Location: Aalborg University, Rendsburggade 14, 9000 Aalborg, room  Rdb 14.3/3.429

09.00: Participant presentation of PhD or other project and prepared assignment 

10.00: Agility and participations in management of projects – experiences from IT systems Jonas Moll, Rehfelt medical and Copenhagne university

Dialogue and discussion

12.15: Lunch

13.00: Three perspective on managing of projects

- Project management in a socio-material perspective Lone Stub Petersen

- Managing of projects in a sensemaking and practice  perspective, Søren Kerndrup

Coffee break

15.00: Workshop: Summing Up: What are the key challenges of managing complex projects and how do we understand them? Lone Stub Petersen og Søren Kerndrup.

Assignments to be prepared for next assembly

16.00: Closing and networking

Managing Complexity in Projects Part 2

Programme for August 22-24

Location: Aalborg University, Rendsburggade 14, , 9000 Aalborg.

Teachers: Associate Professor Søren Kerndrup, Professor Lars Bo Henriksen, Professor Christian Claussen.

 

Wednesday August 22, 9.00-17.00

Location: Aalborg University, Rendsburggade 14, 9000 Aalborg. Room no: 3.429

 

09.30: Welcome to the second assembly, coffee

Introduction to teachers and program

 

10.00: Stakeholder, social and material relations. Søren Kerndrup

 

Dialogue and discussion

 

12.00: Lunch

 

13.00: Complexity and power – sense making, framing and staging in complex projectsChristian Clausen 

Dialogue and discussion

 

15.00: Presentation of assignments

Comments from participants and teachers

 

17.00: End of day programme           

 

Thursday 23 August, 9.00-17.00

Location: Aalborg University, Rendsburggade 14, 9000 Aalborg. Room no: 3.429

 

9.00: Design of spaces. Engagement and empowerment of actors.Søren Kerndrup

 

Dialogue and discussion.

 

10.30: Workshop

 

12.00: Lunch

 

13.00: What are the key lessons? How are complex projects management

 

14.00: Wrapping up.

 

15.00: End of course.

Organizer: Associate Professor Lone Stub Petersen, email: lonep@plan.aau.dk and Associate Professor Søren Kerndrup, email: soeren@plan.aau.dk

Lecturers: Associate Professor Lone Stub Petersen, Associate Professor Søren Kerndrup, Professor Lars Bo Henriksen, Professor Christian Clausen and two external introductory speakers

ECTS: 5

Time: 7 - 8 May and 22 - 24 August 2018

Place: Aalborg University, Rendsburggade 14

7 - 8 May: 
22 - 24 August: Room no 3.429

City: 
9000 Aalborg



Number of seats: 20

Deadline: 16 April 2018

Important information concerning PhD courses 
We have over some time experienced problems with no-show for both project and general courses. It has now reached a point where we are forced to take action. Therefore, the Doctoral School has decided to introduce a no-show fee of DKK 5,000 for each course where the student does not show up. Cancellations are accepted no later than 2 weeks before start of the course. Registered illness is of course an acceptable reason for not showing up on those days. Furthermore, all courses open for registration approximately three months before start. This can hopefully also provide new students a chance to register for courses during the year. We look forward to your registrations.

Welcome to Consequential and IO-based life cycle sustainability assessment

Organizers

The course is organized by The Technical Doctoral School of IT and Design, Aalborg University and Danish Centre for Environmental Assessment (DCEA) www.DCEA.dk, in collaboration with the International Life Cycle Academy (ILCA) www.ILCA.es

Description

The course aims at strengthening skills in life cycle inventory analysis. The course introduces to advanced inventory modelling using the techniques of consequential LCA and input-output (IO) LCA. The students will apply algorithms for performing consequential LCA in the definition of functional unit, consumption mix, and identification of determining and dependent co-products. The course will bring the above mentioned theories further into practice on two specific cases: modelling of indirect Land Use Changes (iLUC) and socio-economic impacts. The course targets the development of advanced competences in LCA by applying the problem based-learning (PBL) teaching method. Following the PBL model that focuses on learning by doing and reflection, the course activities will include intensive group work, problem defining and solving applied to real-word cases, practical exercises, and discussion sessions or workshops. The course is organized in five consecutive days of full-time activities (09:00-16:00). When including readings and group work assignments, the total course workload corresponds to 5 ECTS (1 ETCS = 25 hours of work for the student).

Preliminary programme

Day 1-2: Consequential modelling in life cycle inventory

Day 3: Input-output modelling

Day 4-5: Modelling of indirect land use changes and new perspectives in Life cycle impact assessment

Lecturers

Professor Bo Weidema, Associate Professor Jannick Schmidt, Associate Professor Søren Løkke, Associate professor Massimo Pizzol

Prices

  • PhD students affiliated to a Danish University: Free
  • PhD students not affiliated to a Danish University: 3.000 DKK (400 EUR)
  • Academics (e.g. postdoc and professors): 6.000 DKK (800 EUR)
  • Professionals (consultancy, industry, etc.): 15.000 DKK (2000 EUR)

Prices do not cover meals, accommodation, and social dinner

Registration

Please follow these three steps carefully:

  1. Create a Moodle account here. It is important that you expand and duly fill in the  "Other fields" section. Please  provide a detailed answer to the question "Why do you apply for this course?" and specify what is your scientific background and current level of experience with LCA.
  2. Enrol to the course here. Please sign in with your Moodle account details and click on the "enrol me" button at the bottom of the course page.
  3. Pay the course here  (Payment no later than May 7).

This is an advanced LCA course and participants are expected to have already a LCA background, i.e. basic knowledge of LCA or previous experience with LCA. We reserve the right to cancel your enrolment to the course if this condition is not met, based on the information you provide during subscription. You will receive an acceptance or rejection email after registration and payment have been received. In case of rejection the registration fee will be refunded. If you are unsure whether your LCA level is sufficient for this course or not, please contact the course organizer via mail to massimo@plan.aau.dk.

ECTS Distribution

The 5 ECTS credits of the course are divided approximately in this way:

  • Lectures and group work in class: 40 hours, 1,6 ECTS
  • Readings: 40 hours, 1,6 ECTS
  • Group work prior to course: 20 huors, 0,8 ECTS
  • Group work after course: 25 hours, 1 ECTS

Total: 125 hours, 5 ECTS

Activities include attending to the lectures and performing exercises in class. Readings include approx. 100 pages of scientific articles and reports, that are provided to the students. Students work in groups (max 5 people), each group will work on a case study and apply the knowledge of the course on the case study.

EXAMPLE, a group works on an LCA of a product and does:

  • prior to the course: choice of product and data mining, getting base knowledge and data to describe the product system.
  • during the course (exercises in class): consequential inventory with matrix format, IO LCA inventory, inclusion of iLUC, inclusion of social impacts, etc.
  • after the course: organize the material and prepare a portfolio/article where all the techniques are presented for the case study.

Eventually, all portfolios are made available. Each student will thus get the info on five different cases. Students should be able to organize themselves using online tools (skype, dropbox etc) to collaborate in group remotely prior and after the course.

Time: May 28 – June 1, 2018

Place: Aalborg University, Rendsburggade 14, 9000 Aalborg (DK), Room no 3.329

City: Aalborg

Number of seats: 25

Registration deadline: May 7, 2018

Important information concerning PhD courses We have over some time experienced problems with no-show for both project and general courses. It has now reached a point where we are forced to take action. Therefore, the Doctoral School has decided to introduce a no-show fee of DKK 5,000 for each course where the student does not show up. Cancellations are accepted no later than 2 weeks before start of the course. Registered illness is of course an acceptable reason for not showing up on those days. Furthermore, all courses open for registration approximately three months before start. This can hopefully also provide new students a chance to register for courses during the year. We look forward to your registrations.

Welcome to Innovative Processes and their Staging

Description:

While innovation is increasingly depending on the incorporation of knowledge from a diversity of sources, questions are raised as to what kinds of sources, and how they are incorporated in processes of innovation. As innovative challenges and conditions are changing with increasing pace these questions cannot just be solved through a singular choice of organisation or established guidelines for selecting innovative ideas. Issues of how to stage the scene and circumstances and how to facilitate processes and the involvement of diverse actors in innovation have increasingly come into focus. Successful innovation is seen as the outcome of interactions within a broader network spanning across diverse organisational and societal boundaries and institutions. There is a need to address the creation and navigation of new for a and spaces for development where existing frames of understandings may be challenged and new patterns for interactions emerge.

The course takes its departure in the well-described dilemmas between incremental but often path dependent innovative processes within established networks and the quest for the development of new innovative, disruptive or breakthrough ideas, product and services facilitated through new networked relations. A range of theories, cases and approaches concerned with the framing, organising and staging of innovative processes, from linear sequential models to complex, dynamic networks of innovation are treated and related to the current work of the participants.

During the course, a dialogue is created between the participants’ projects and a diversity of understandings of the management and staging of innovation from organisation, institutional theory and sociology of innovation. The idea is to direct inquiry and to stimulate theoretical insights and empirical approaches in the field of innovation. The course introduces concepts, which help render relevant phenomena and issues (relationships, dynamics, consequences) in the participants’ projects visible and open to investigation and analysis. This would, in turn, also help in delineating hypotheses of relevance to the investigation of innovative processes and their staging, and in proposing new directions for research in the field.

The program will cover the following themes:

  • Challenges in innovation management and the staging of innovative processes
  • Innovation as heterogeneous processes of interaction involving actors, artefacts and knowledge
  • Innovation as a journey characterized by uncertainty, ambiguity and complexity
  • Innovation between rational analytical and interpretive processes, exploitation and exploration 
  • Innovation as networking, brokering and collaboration in and between organizations
  • From planning and calculation to social learning and translation of interests
  • ‘Co-creation’ and ‘path creation’ as heterogeneous network building, 
  • Staging and navigation of temporary spaces for innovation across knowledge boundaries

 

Form

The students should be familiar with basic understandings of innovative processes from innovation process theory and/or science and technology studies (the STS field) on an academic master level.

The program includes teacher presentations, student presentations, company talks and dialogue sessions where students will receive feedback on their presentations and projects from fellow students as well as teachers.

As a preparation for the first assembly, participants should prepare a presentation of a problem/solution from their research, which they want to analyse from an innovation process perspective. The presentation can focus on a case and/or a challenging perspective (oral supported with ppt) within the theme of the course (It is important to describe how innovation processes could be a relevant perspective for your activities in order to provide a professional and empirical background for your own reflexive learning.)

Between the first and second assembly participants write a 5-10 pages analysis bringing theory to bear on selected case material of their own choice. These assignments are basis for evaluation and approval of participation. In addition participants will be asked to fill in a formal evaluation scheme. 

 

 

Programme for 7-8 june, 2018

Location: Aalborg University, Rensburggade 6, 9000 Aalborg - room Rdb 6/171

Teachers: Associate professor Søren Kerndrup, AAU, SIP; professor Christian Clausen, AAU, DIST. Associate professor Astrid Heidemann Lassen, CIP, AAU. 

 

June 7., 9.00-18.00

09.00: Registration, Coffee and rolls.

 

09.30: Welcome and introduction  Christian Clausen

  • Introduction to participants, teachers and program

 

10.00: Innovation a process perspective: What characterizes processes and how are processes understood and used in innovationSøren Kerndrup

Dialogue and discussions            

11.00: Innovation journey: The development of the energy pump at Grundfos. Christian Clausen

Dialogue and discussion

12.30: Lunch

13.15: Methodology and tools, important actors in radical and incremental innovations practices Søren Kerndrup

Dialogue and discussion

14.20: Participant presentation of their PhD or other projects and prepared assignments (approx. 10 min presentation + 10 min. discussion).

Coffee break

15.00: Open innovation, lessons from practice. Astrid Heidemann Lassen

16.45: Participant presentation of their PhD or other projects and prepared assignments (approx. 10 min presentation + 10 min. discussion).

17.45: Summing Up: What are the key lessons seen from a process perspective: How are processes conceptualised and used? Christian Clausen & Søren Kerndrup.

!8.00 Closing the session

19.00: Going out together?

 

 

June 8, 9.00-16.00 

09.00: Innovation across boundaries in and between projects, organizations and communities, Søren Kerndrup

Dialogue and discussion

Coffee break

10.30: Innovation and creation of spaces. Christian Clausen

Dialogue and discussion

12.00 Lunch

12.45: Participant presentation of PhD or other project and prepared assignments (approx. 10 min presentation + 10 min. discussion). 

13.45 Innovation as a design of transformations Søren Kerndrup

Dialogue and discussion

15.00: Discussions of themes based on the participants’ choices. 

Coffee 

16.00: Summing Up: What are the key lessons seen from a process perspective: How is the processes conceptualized and used? Søren Kerndrup

Dialogue and discussion

16.30: Closing and networking

Preliminary programme for 13.-15. November 

Location: Aalborg University Copenhagen, AC Meyers Vænge 15, 2450 Copenhagen SV.
Room no 0.24 in Building C

Teachers: Ole Tangsgaard, Tangsgaard consult/rinnovation; Professor Peter Karnøe, AAU, DIST; associate professor Søren Kerndrup, AAU, DIST; associate professor Hanne Lindegaard and professor Christian Clausen, AAU, DIST.

  

september 26, 9.00-17.00

09.30: Welcome to the second assembly at AAU CPH, coffee

Introduction to teachers and program

10.30: Political and learning perspectives on innovation processes, Christian Clausen

Dialogue and discussion

12.00: Lunch

13.00: Presentation of assignments

Comments from participants and teachers

14.00: Practice perspectives on innovative processes, Søren Kerndrup

Dialogue and discussion

15.30: Presentation of assignments

Comments from participants and teachers 

17.00: End of day programme                           

 

september 27, 9.00-17.00

9.00: Actor Network Perspectives on innovation: Path dependencies and path creation,Peter Karnøe

Dialogue and discussion

10.30: Presentation of assignments

Comments from participants and teachers

12.30: Lunch

13.30: Creation of meaning in innovation processes a design perspective, Hanne Lindegaard.

Dialogue and discussion

15.00: Presentation of assignments

Comments from participants and teachers

17.00: End of day program

19.00: Going out to eat together?

 

september 28, 9.00-15.00

9.00: Staging innovative processes: Arenas, spaces and artefactsChristian Clausen

 Dialogue and discussion.

10.30: Presentation of assignments.

Comments from participants and teachers

12.00: Lunch

13.00: What are the key lessons seen from a process perspective: How are processes conceptualised and used?

14.00: Wrapping up.

15.00: End of course.

Organizer: Associate Professor Søren Kerndrup, email: soeren@plan.aau.dk and Professor Christian Clausen, email: chcl@plan.aau.dk

Lecturers: Associate Professor Søren Kerndrup; Professor Christian Clausen; Business Development Manager Ole Tangsgaard, Condair A/S; Associate Professor Astrid Heidemann Lassen; Professor Peter Karnøe, and Associate Professor Hanne Lindegaard

ECTS: 5

Time: 7-8 June  and 26-28 September


Place:

June: 
Aalborg University 
Rensburggade 14
9000 Aalborg

September:
Aalborg University in Copenhagen 
A.C. Meyers Vænge 15
2450 Copenhagen SV
Room no 0.24 Byg C

City: 

Number of seats: 20

Deadline: 17 May 2018

Important information concerning PhD courses
 We have over some time experienced problems with no-show for both project and general courses. It has now reached a point where we are forced to take action. Therefore, the Doctoral School has decided to introduce a no-show fee of DKK 5,000 for each course where the student does not show up. Cancellations are accepted no later than 2 weeks before start of the course. Registered illness is of course an acceptable reason for not showing up on those days. Furthermore, all courses open for registration approximately three months before start. This can hopefully also provide new students a chance to register for courses during the year. We look forward to your registrations.

Welcome to Spatial Decision Support Systems for Maritime Spatial Panning

Description:

Maritime Spatial Planning is a complicated process balancing different uses of the sea without making severe impacts on the environment.

The aim of this PhD course is to introduce the PhD students to various methodologies for spatial decisions support, give them an overview of existing systems, and discuss relevant evaluation criteria and decision alternatives in the context of maritime spatial planning.

The PhD course is closely related to the BONUS BASMATI research project, and will include experiences and preliminary results from the project.

 

The course will cover the following topics:

  • Introduction to spatial decision support systems
  • Evaluation criteria and decision alternatives
  • Data handling and quality assessment
  • Weighting methods
  • Sensitivity analysis in multi-criteria decision making
  • Location and allocation problems using multiple criteria analysis
  • Collaborative decision making
  • Knowledge about appropriate software
  • The role of decision support systems in maritime spatial planning
  • Cumulative impact assessment
  • Case studies – feedback on students work

 

Before the course each PhD student must deliver a description of their PhD work and scientific reflections on their potential use of spatial decision support systems (max 2 A4 pages).

 

After the course the PhD students must submit a draft paper (4-6 pages) on their own use of spatial decision support systems.

Organizer: Prof. Henning Sten Hansen (AAU) & Senior researcher Kerstin Schiele (IOW) Germany

Lecturers: Henning Sten Hansen, Kerstin Schiele, Carsten Kessler, Jamal Jokar, and Lise Schrøder and key note speakers to be confirmed.

ECTS: 5

Time: 20 - 22 August 2018

Place: Aalborg University Copenhagen, A.C. Meyers Vænge 15, room 2.1.042

Zip code: DK-2450

City: 
Copenhagen

Number of seats:15

Deadline: 1 August 2018

Important information concerning PhD courses
 We have over some time experienced problems with no-show for both project and general courses. It has now reached a point where we are forced to take action. Therefore, the Doctoral School has decided to introduce a no-show fee of DKK 5,000 for each course where the student does not show up. Cancellations are accepted no later than 2 weeks before start of the course. Registered illness is of course an acceptable reason for not showing up on those days. Furthermore, all courses open for registration approximately three months before start. This can hopefully also provide new students a chance to register for courses during the year. We look forward to your registrations.

Welcome to Future Media- Technologies and markets


Description:

The course is concerned with the development of the audio/visual media sector from technology, market and policy perspectives.

Media landscapes have gone through major changes throughout the history and have been undergoing fundamental changes in recent years and will continue to do so in the near future. The changes have intensified in the last two decades starting with the digitalization of broadcast infrastructures and presently with the development of streaming platforms and the development of broadband infrastructures and cloud platforms that most likely will result in the end of dedicated infrastructures for media distributions. Time shifting, place shifting, video and audio on demand, and global networks for distribution of audio visual content are just a few examples of these changes. The implications are, e.g., the disruption of the traditional media distribution and delivery forms, distribution of content markets, disruption of home video markets, disruption of the record and music industry. Furthermore, there are major changes in the usage and consumption behavior connected with terminal devices and the combination of audio visual applications and services with social networking applications.

These changes are driven by the interplay between technological developments, market developments and new business models and the policy and regulatory environment. The aim of this course is to discuss the driving forces for such changes and to examine the implications for the market, industry, users and the technological development.

The course will address the following topics:

-          Convergence

-          New business models

-          Standardization processes

-          Dedicated TV and radio infrastructures – the current status and future perspectives

-          Linear and nonlinear audio-visual services

-          Over the Top (OTT) and hybrid platforms

-          Development of fixed and mobile broadband infrastructures, including LTE and 5G as platform for audio visual services

Market developments and usage

Organizer: Anders Henten, Reza Tadayoni

Lecturers: Knud Erik Skouby, Anders Henten, Reza Tadayoni, Jannick Sørensen

ECTS: 3

Time: 5-7 September 2018

Place: Aalborg University Copenhagen


City: 

Number of seats: 20

Deadline: 15 August 2018

Important information concerning PhD courses
 We have over some time experienced problems with no-show for both project and general courses. It has now reached a point where we are forced to take action. Therefore, the Doctoral School has decided to introduce a no-show fee of DKK 5,000 for each course where the student does not show up. Cancellations are accepted no later than 2 weeks before start of the course. Registered illness is of course an acceptable reason for not showing up on those days. Furthermore, all courses open for registration approximately three months before start. This can hopefully also provide new students a chance to register for courses during the year. We look forward to your registrations.

Welcome to Potentials and challenges of circular economy as sustainability strategy in businesses and cities


Description:

It is increasingly acknowledged that the linear ‘take-make-dispose’ economic model is reaching its limits, and initiatives to develop alternative economic models are emerging. Circular economy is currently getting a lot of attention, because it promises an industrial system that is restorative by design. Both businesses and cities are developing circular economy strategies.

However, circular economy is not without shortcomings as strategy for sustainable development. It is risky promoting a circular economy, where focus merely is on closing existing material flows and not trying to understand the dynamics of the present linear economy by questioning why we produce what, the challenge to closing material flows from the globalized, outsourced cheap production, and when and why products lose value to their users and become waste.

The course introduces potentials and challenges to circular economy from a business perspective and from an urban perspective.  Theoretically the course integrates theories about product chains, value chains, social practices, user-oriented innovation and governance.

 

Three types of re-design processes are proposed, which are necessary to consider when developing circular economy business models within specific institutional and regulatory contexts: 1) re-designs of products and services based on considerations about necessary changes in roles of products, users, service, infrastructure, etc. 2) re-designing value chains both up-stream and down-stream and 3) internal organizational redesign of the business organization in order to integrate environmental concerns in product and strategy development.

 

From an urban perspective different roles in developing and supporting circular economy are introduced: 1) Public planning, 2) Public infrastructures, 3) Public procurement, 4) Public building and construction, 5) Local business development.

Organizer: Arne Remmen and Michael Søgaard Jørgensen

Lecturers: Arne Remmen, AAU; Michael Søgaard Jørgensen, AAU; Erik Hagelskjær Lauridsen, AAU; Nancy Bocken, Lund University, business representative, municipal administration manager, infrastructure manager

ECTS: 5

Time: October 2018

Place: Aalborg University;  Aalborg or Copenhagen campus

City: 

Number of seats: 25

Deadline: 10 September 2018

Important information concerning PhD courses 
We have over some time experienced problems with no-show for both project and general courses. It has now reached a point where we are forced to take action. Therefore, the Doctoral School has decided to introduce a no-show fee of DKK 5,000 for each course where the student does not show up. Cancellations are accepted no later than 2 weeks before start of the course. Registered illness is of course an acceptable reason for not showing up on those days. Furthermore, all courses open for registration approximately three months before start. This can hopefully also provide new students a chance to register for courses during the year. We look forward to your registrations.

Welcome to Smart cities – technologies and institutions


Description:

Smart cities is one of the current rallying calls with appeals to stakeholders from the information and communication technology areas as well as health, environment, traffic, waste handling, planning, etc. The present course will focus on information and communication technology infrastructures for improving quality of life, mobility, communications etc. in cities. This includes technologies relating to Internet of Things (IoT), cloud computing and broadband including mobile communications. The course aims at examining how such technologies can contribute to solving the abovementioned issues and at discussing the institutional structures that can facilitate these processes.  

Relevant technology developments will be taken up and the potential business set-ups for realizing smart city applications will be discussed. As there are many and diverse providers of potential technology and organizational solutions, standardization developments will be examined. Furthermore, many of the smart city applications will require extensive retrieval and use of data including personal and possibly sensitive data, questions regarding data security and protection will be addressed. Finally, there will be focus on the institutional structures comprising rules and regulations and the organizational foundation. 

The course will address the following topics:

-          Technology solutions and developments

-          Business models and business ecosystems for realizing the visions in the different application areas including modes of public private partnerships

-          Issues relating to technology standardization

-          Issues regarding security and the protection of privacy

Facilitating and inhibiting institutional structures

Organizer: Reza Tadayoni, Knud Erik Skouby, Anders Henten

Lecturers: Reza Tadayoni, Knud Erik Skouby, Anders Henten, Per Lynggaard

ECTS: 3

Time: 14-16 November 2018

Place: Aalborg University Copenhagen

City: 

Number of seats: 20

Deadline: 24 October 2018


Important information concerning PhD courses We have over some time experienced problems with no-show for both project and general courses. It has now reached a point where we are forced to take action. Therefore, the Doctoral School has decided to introduce a no-show fee of DKK 5,000 for each course where the student does not show up. Cancellations are accepted no later than 2 weeks before start of the course. Registered illness is of course an acceptable reason for not showing up on those days. Furthermore, all courses open for registration approximately three months before start. This can hopefully also provide new students a chance to register for courses during the year. We look forward to your registrations.

Welcome to Problem Based Learning – pedagogy and philosophy   

Description:

Still more PhD projects are investigating and developing problem based learning. This course offer students of problem based learning an introduction to the background – the history and philosophy of the pedagogy. In the course, we will address issues such as ‘where did PBL come from?’, ‘What are the main ideas behind PBL?’ and ‘How can we do research in PBL?’. The students will be asked to prepare a short presentation of their own project and used this as a starting point for a more general discussion of their own projects relation to PBL.    


Organizer: Professor, Lars Bo Henriksen, lbh@plan.aau.dk

Lecturers: Professor, Anette Kolmos, Dept of Planning, Professor, Lars Bo Henriksen, Dept of Planning, Associate professor, Jette Holgaard, Dept of Planning

ECTS: 2

Time: 26 - 28 September 2018

Place: Aalborg University

City: 
9000 Aalborg

Number of seats:

Deadline: 5 September 2018

Important information concerning PhD courses
 We have over some time experienced problems with no-show for both project and general courses. It has now reached a point where we are forced to take action. Therefore, the Doctoral School has decided to introduce a no-show fee of DKK 5,000 for each course where the student does not show up. Cancellations are accepted no later than 2 weeks before start of the course. Registered illness is of course an acceptable reason for not showing up on those days. Furthermore, all courses open for registration approximately three months before start. This can hopefully also provide new students a chance to register for courses during the year. We look forward to your registrations.

Welcome to Advanced Topics:  Sustainability, Resilience and Innovation in Coastal Communities and Industries

Description:

Social sustainability implies an ability of society—and members of

society—to be resilient: socially, economically, and environmentally.  Yet communities are continually being impacted by outside forces such as globalisation, climate and environmental change, and governmental policies. 

  • What makes resilient coastal communities and industries?
  • What role does innovation play in sustainability and resilience of such coastal communities and industries?

This seminar provides a social sciences perspective on locality studies in coastal communities and regional development.  The course should be of use to any student in the humanities and social sciences interested in blue governance, resilience, sustainability, innovation and cultural heritage.

Course participants will be introduced to selected anthropological and social science theories and concepts such as social sustainability, resilience, cultural heritage, identity, and sense of place that will help in examining and parsing the culture and meaning underlying local development strategies in the face of outside impacts from, for example, globalization, environmental change, and natural disasters.

This seminar will examine two common recovery and blue growth development strategies of coastal communities and their members:

 

1.  New/old coastal economies: from traditional industries such as fishing and ship-building, to new ones such as seaweed harvesting, product branding, and offshore wind farms.

2.  Tourism / Cultural Heritage: Cultural heritage can include, for example, traditional coastal knowledge and skills, land/seascapes, and marine architecture.  Such heritage is increasingly being used to increase tourism development in coastal areas. 

Critical discussions of blue growth, community, sense of place and cultural heritage and how these may foster or impair sustainability and resilience will take place in light of changes to coastal communities and coastal industries today, seen through select case studies and with the knowledge that different micro-cultures and groups will often have differing views on what is best for their own community.

Prerequisites: approved 2 month PhD study plan

Learning objectives: Developing the understanding, skills and competencies needed to prepare for and think about theories and methodologies that support analyses of community and development.  Learning outcomes will focus on particular research theories within particular traditions and 'schools of thought' especially those that embrace and have implications for not only cultural analysis, but also community development and blue growth. The course will introduce students to the concepts of resilience and sustainability. A second objective is to critically examine the theories and methods that shape efforts to use cultural heritage, sense of place, and identities today and how these impact contemporary coastal societies.  

Teaching methods: This course is designed as a seminar whereby participants shall reflect on different literature, relate the texts and presentations to their own research and experience, and actively participate in discussions.

Teaching methods will include working in smaller groups to discuss the strengths and weaknesses of case study strategies for development.

Criteria for assessment: Participants who wish to receive 5 ECTS points shall submit a 10 page (single spaced) paper 3 weeks following the close of the course.  The topic is to be developed with the instructor and related closely to the themes of the course

 

Tentative Proposed Key literature:

Aldrich, D. P. (2012), Building Resilience: Social Capital in Post-Disaster Recovery, Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

 

Arnold, B.  “The Contested Past.” Anthropology Today 15 (1999): 1-4.

Right This Way:  Tourism and Presenting Cultural Heritage to the Public

 

Low, S.M. “Social Sustainability: People, History, and Values,” in Managing Change: Sustainable Approaches to the Conservation of the Built Environment, p. 47-64.

 

Massey, Doreen. 1993.  “Questions of Locality” Geography vol 78, no. 2

 

Nadel-Klein, J.  2003.  Fishing for Heritage: Modernity and Loss along the Scottish Coast.  New York: Berg Press.

 

Singh, Timothy, and Dowling.  1993.  Tourism in Destination Communities. Oxford: CABI International.

 

Timothy, D.J.,  “Introduction,” in Managing Heritage and Cultural Tourism Resources.  Critical Essays, Vol. I. p. xi-xxv.

 

Vallance, S., Perkins, H.C., and Dixon, J.E. (2011), “What is social sustainability? A clarification of concepts.” In Geoforum, 42: 342–348.



Organizer: Alyne Delaney

Lecturers: Alyne Delaney, Kristen Ounanian; Jan van Tatenhove

ECTS: 2 ; 5 with paper

Time: 2 days workshop, Autumn 2018

Place: Aalborg

City: 

Number of seats: 15

Deadline:

Important information concerning PhD courses 
We have over some time experienced problems with no-show for both project and general courses. It has now reached a point where we are forced to take action. Therefore, the Doctoral School has decided to introduce a no-show fee of DKK 5,000 for each course where the student does not show up. Cancellations are accepted no later than 2 weeks before start of the course. Registered illness is of course an acceptable reason for not showing up on those days. Furthermore, all courses open for registration approximately three months before start. This can hopefully also provide new students a chance to register for courses during the year. We look forward to your registrations.

Welcome to Institutions and Public Regulation - Options for Planning and Managing Technological Innovation for Smart Energy Systems


Description:

A “business-as-usual” energy scenario may be changed into a scenario based on renewable energy and flexibility. Going towards 100% renewable energy systems requires Smart energy systems. But what are the demands of institutions, organisations, and public regulation on the technological trajectory of this change?

The aim of this course is to enable the PhD researcher to analyse the interplay between technological innovation and the institutional/regulatory framework in which it is embedded. The PhD course focuses on the energy sector, but its content is also applicable to other institutional and regulatory frameworks where radical technological changes are investigated.

                                                           

The objective is for you to use the content as an inspiration for an article or for your dissertation.

 

The course enables you to use cases for examining institutions and public regulation and raises an awareness of different innovation paths. Initially, you will be introduced to theories of markets, state, public regulation, and innovation, and to methodologies to research the mechanisms within these areas. Cases are presented which may illustrate that technological trajectories are closely linked to different institutional and regulatory models and actors.

 

Potential case themes include: Privatisation and liberalisation programmes, public-private partnerships, EU renewable energy policy, transportation policy, CO2 trading schemes, green certificates, bottom-up and top-down technological innovation, strategic energy planning and other.

Organizer: Brian Vad Mathiesen

Lecturers: 

ECTS: 3

Time: 2018 (3-4 full days + assignments)

Place: AAU Copenhagen Campus

City: 

Number of seats: 40

Deadline:

Important information concerning PhD courses 
We have over some time experienced problems with no-show for both project and general courses. It has now reached a point where we are forced to take action. Therefore, the Doctoral School has decided to introduce a no-show fee of DKK 5,000 for each course where the student does not show up. Cancellations are accepted no later than 2 weeks before start of the course. Registered illness is of course an acceptable reason for not showing up on those days. Furthermore, all courses open for registration approximately three months before start. This can hopefully also provide new students a chance to register for courses during the year. We look forward to your registrations

Welcome to Theories of Sustainable Transitions


Description:

This PhD course is intended for students conducting research related to analysis, design and innovation processes for the needed transformations to achieve sustainability goals. The teachers of the course will offer advanced discussion in theories of transitions and will illustrate their theoretical work through case studies conducted in various places including Holland, Denmark, the United Kingdom, Brazil and Argentina. These case studies range from local community based initiatives, to city projects to country and regional programs for sustainability. International collaboration efforts will also be discussed.

 

 

Objectives

At the end of this course the students would be able to:

  1. Explain how their own project and ideas relate to state of the art discussions in transitions theories (MLP; TIS; AOD; Practice Theory)
  2. Explain the principal issues involved in innovations for sustainable transitions.
  3. Describe the main challenges and efforts to sustainable transitions in various countries.
  4. Describe the main challenges and efforts to sustainable transitions in urban settings analysing examples from Europe.
  5. Describe the main governance challenges and advancements in relation to governance theories to achieve sustainable transitions.

 

Activity timeline:

 

Students should:

 

  1. Enrol in the course by 31 March 2018 at https://phd.moodle.aau.dk/login/
  2. Deliver a one-page description of their project by 1 of April 2018. Please be clear about what are the questions of your research project and in what ways you imagine that the transitions theories might be supportive.
  3. Deliver by the 1st of May 2018 a three-page analysis of how their project relates to the course. In what ways does the literature help the project? In what ways does the project serves as a basis to criticize the literature?
  4. Make a presentation during the course in order to get feedback from the teachers. The aim of the presentation is that students test their ideas of how the theories of transitions might be supportive of their project. (This is optional but strongly recommended)
  5. Deliver by the 30th of July 2018 a 10 page paper with the full elaboration of their ideas. Ideally this exercise should support the students’ progress in their PhD either by advancing her state of the art review, a chapter, an article or any kind of structured idea.

 

In short:

Deadline for enrolment: 31 March 2018

Deadline for project paper: 1 of April 2018

Preparatory reading and writing: 1 April – 1 May 2018

Deadline for preliminary analysis: 1 May 2018

Meetings: 17-19 May (3 full days)

Delivery of a 10 page paper: 30 July 2018

 

 

Readings

 

Objective

 

At the end of this course the students will be able to:

 

Readings

 

This reading list is recommended. Students are free to replace these readings with others they might consider more pertinent. The objective however is that students should mature their theoretical take on their project through the course.

 

Explain how their own project and ideas relate to state of the art discussions in transitions theories (MLP; TIS; AOD)

 

Jørgensen, U. (2012). Mapping and navigating transitions—The multi-level perspective compared with arenas of development. Research Policy.

 

MARKARD, J. & TRUFFER, B. 2008. Technological innovation systems and the multi-level perspective: Towards an integrated framework. Research Policy, 37, 596-615.

GEELS, F. W., HEKKERT, M. P. & JACOBSSON, S. 2008. The dynamics of sustainable innovation journeys. Technology Analysis & Strategic Management, 20, 521-536.

Explain the principal issues involved in innovations for sustainable transitions.

 

Smith, A. (2007) Translating sustainabilities between green niches and socio-technical regimes, Technology Analysis & Strategic Management, 19, 4: 427-450

Marin, A. and M. Vila Seoane (2013). “A path breaking niche: The Cooperative COOPSOL Ltda.”. Report for the IDRC funded project “Opening up Natural Resource-Based Industries for Innovation: Exploring New Pathways for Development in Latin America”.

Smith, A. and R. Raven (2012) What is protective space? Reconsidering niches in transitions to sustainability, Research Policy 41: 1025-1036.

Smith, A., Kern, F, Raven, R. and B. Verhees (2013 – in press) Spaces for sustainable innovation: solar photovoltaic electricity in the UK, Technological Forecasting & Social Change

 

Describe the main challenges and efforts to sustainable transitions in Brazil and Argentina.

 

Smith, A., Fressoli, M. and H. Thomas (2012 – accepted) Grassroots innovation movements: challenges and contributions, Journal of Cleaner Production

Marin, A. (2012): Putting natural resources industries to work for sustainable development in Latin America. Poverty in Focus, Nro 24, International Policy Centre for Inclusive Growth, p: 35-37.

Marin, A., L. Stubrin and P. Van Zwanenberg (2013). “ Developing capabilities in the seed industry:  which direction to follow? .” Report for the IDRC funded project “Opening up Natural Resource-Based Industries for Innovation: Exploring New Pathways for Development in Latin America”.

Galvão, A., Juruá, M. and L. Esteves (2012). “The Amazons and the Use of its Biodiversity”. Report for the IDRC funded project “Opening up Natural Resource-Based Industries for Innovation: Exploring New Pathways for Development in Latin America”.

 

Describe the main challenges and efforts to sustainable transitions in urban settings analysing examples from Europe and Latin America.

 

Bulkeley, Harriet, and Michele Betsill. "Rethinking sustainable cities: multilevel governance and the 'urban'politics of climate change." Environmental Politics 14.1 (2005): 42-63.

Murphy, J and A Smith (2013 – in press) Understanding transition-periphery dynamics: renewable energy in the Highlands and Islands of Scotland, Environment and Planning A

Lissandrello, E. and Grin, J. (2011) Reflexive Planning as Design and Work: Lessons from the Port of Amsterdam. Planning Theory and Practice

Describe the main governance challenges and advancements in relation to governance theories to achieve sustainable transitions.

 

Voβ, J-P., Smith, A. And J. Grin (2009) Designing long-term policy: re-thinking transition management Policy Sciences 42, 4: 275-302

Smith, A. and A.Stirling (2010) The politics of social-ecological resilience and sustainable socio-technical transitions Ecology & Society 15, 1: online http://www.ecologyandsociety.org/vol15/iss1/art11/

Smith, A. and F. Kern (2009) The transitions storyline in Dutch environmental policy Environmental Politics, 18, 1: 78-98

Lissandrello, E. and Sterrenberg, L. (forthcoming) Transitions in Dutch Politics of Planning



Organizer: Andrés Valderrama and Ulrik Jørgensen

Lecturers: Professor Rob Raven (University of Utrecht); the organizers; and the following from DIST: Inge Røpke, Jens Stissing Jensen, Charlotte Louise Jensen.

ECTS: 5

Time: May 14-16 2018

Place: Aalborg University Copenhagen, AC Meyers Vænge 15, 2450 Copenhagen SV

ROOM NO: 3.133 in Building D located at Fredrikskaj 10A (just next to AC Meyers Vænge



City: 
Copenhagen

Number of seats: 15

Deadline: March 31 2018

Important information concerning PhD courses
 We have over some time experienced problems with no-show for both project and general courses. It has now reached a point where we are forced to take action. Therefore, the Doctoral School has decided to introduce a no-show fee of DKK 5,000 for each course where the student does not show up. Cancellations are accepted no later than 2 weeks before start of the course. Registered illness is of course an acceptable reason for not showing up on those days. Furthermore, all courses open for registration approximately three months before start. This can hopefully also provide new students a chance to register for courses during the year. We look forward to your registrations

Welcome to Health, Food and Fragility – Designing Methodological and Scientific Approaches in the Field of Food, Health, Eating, Meals, Gerontology and Nutrition

The aim of this PhD course is to introduce comprehensive, human centred approaches in health related studies on food, meals, nutrition, gerontology and fragility. Hence, the PhD course offers PhD students covering one or more of the themes: health, food, meals, nutrition, gerontology, and fragility in their research. The course approaches PhD students who are in the beginning as well as last phase of their studies.

The aim is furthermore to include participants with a wide range of scientific approaches, to provide the opportunity for PhD students to reflect upon and explore new aspects of relevance for their study. Thus, participants are encouraged to present research based on qualitative as well as quantitative data, since a primary focus of the course is to embrace different methodological scientific perspectives.

The course will be 3-day course, and a follow up 1-day congress.

Before the course each PhD student must deliver:

  1. Max. 1 page A4– representing reflections on scientific and methodological choices (including project title and problem / hypothesis).
  2. Submit a draft paper (4-6 pages)

On the course each student prepare reviews for two co-participants papers.

Each student delivers a 10-15 minutes presentation (based on the own work/draft paper).

One expert/lecturer and to reviewers (phd students) will give feedback.

This feedback is to be used as inspiration for revision of the paper

Last, each student select and present a ‘Golden paper’ – a paper that has provided a significant impact on own research choices, reflections or the like (short 2-3 minutes presentation).

The participants must read every golden paper.  

Deliverables:

  1. Draft paper (4-6 Pages)
  2. Presentation at the course
  3. Review and discussion of two papers
  4. Golden paper
  5. Revision of draft paper prepared for publication in a relevant/selected journal

Keynote speakers will be invited to the PhD course to offer overviews of the state of art of qualitative as well as quantitative based studies in the field with the aim of encouraging critical studies and new insights and knowledge.

The course offers

  1. Keynote speakers in the study of health, food and fragility.  
  2. A forum to present and discuss theoretical approaches with other peers
  3. The opportunity to present your PhD research at various stages of completion and receive critical comments, through a paper and presentation
  4. Insight into funding opportunities

Organizers: Professor Niels Heine Kristensen (nhk@plan.aau.dk / niels.kristensen@umu.se), Associate Professor Mette W Hansen (mwh@plan.aau.dk), Anne Marie Beck, PhD student Line Hesselvig Krogh

Lecturers: Professor Niels Heine Kristensen, Associate Professor Mette W Hansen, Anne Marie Beck and Keynote speakers (TBC)

ECTS: 4

Time: 23-25 May 2018, and follow-up day on 21.9.18

Place: Foodscape Lab, Aalborg University Copenhagen, Frederiks Kaj 10A, Room no 0.133.

City: 2450 Copenhagen SV

Number of seats: 10

Deadline: 15 April 2018

 

Important information concerning PhD courses We have over some time experienced problems with no-show for both project and general courses. It has now reached a point where we are forced to take action. Therefore, the Doctoral School has decided to introduce a no-show fee of DKK 5,000 for each course where the student does not show up. Cancellations are accepted no later than 2 weeks before start of the course. Registered illness is of course an acceptable reason for not showing up on those days. Furthermore, all courses open for registration approximately three months before start. This can hopefully also provide new students a chance to register for courses during the year. We look forward to your registrations.