Welcome to Estimation theory for signal processing and communications


Description:

An estimator is a way to “guess” the value of an entity from data stochastically related to it.  Estimation theory, which may be considered as an element of “machine learning”, is highly relevant for researchers who are often facing problems of inferring parameters from data gathered from measurements or simulations.  This is in particular true for researchers within communications and signal processing.

 

The aim of this course is to give an overview of the field of estimation theory and the tools to derive and evaluate new estimators for specific engineering applications.  The course is centered around three main topics:

  1. Introduction to point estimators and performance bounds
  2. Connection between estimation theory and information theory
  3. Bayesian inference on graphical models

 

The teachers of the course are all actively developing estimators as a part of their research. Therefore, we will during the course give examples of how we use the theory in our own research work.

Prerequisites:

Background in probability theory and statistics at the level taught at the MSc at AAU. Some background in stochastic processes is useful, but not required.

Learning objectives:

The intended learning outcome is that the participants will be able to apply methods from the course to problems within their own fields of research.

Teaching methods:

The course will consist of lectures combined with exercises and work on the students own estimation problem. As a part of the exercises, the students will formulate an estimation/inference problem related to their field of research and to apply some of the methods to that problem.

 

Criteria for assessment:

Active participation is expected. At the end of the course, the students will present their results of the work during the course and give/receive feedback from lecturers and peers.

Key literature:

The course will be based on lecture notes writing by the teachers supplemented by selected chapters from text books by SM Kay, Scharf, van den Boos, Bishop and Cover&Thomas (TBC).


Organizer: Assoc. Prof. Troels Pedersen, Dept Electronic Systems (WCN). troels@es.aau.dk


Lecturers: Assoc Prof. Troels Pedersen (Dept. ES / WCN), Prof. Jan Østergaard (Dept. ES / SIP), Assoc, Prof. Carles Navarro Manchon, (Dept. ES / WCN), Assoc Prof. Elisabeth de Carvalho (Dept. ES / CNT)


ECTS: 3

Time: 6 November - 6 December 2018

Nov 6, (Half day) 13:00—16:00, Fredrik Bajers Vej 7, room B2-107

Nov 7, 9:00—12:00, 13:00—16:00, Niels Jernes Vej 12, room A5-006

Nov 9, 9:00—12:00, 13:00—16:00, Niels Jernes Vej 12, room A5-006

Nov 12, 9:00—12:00, 13:00—16:00, Niels Jernes Vej 12, room A5-006

Nov 13 (Half day) , 9:00—12:00, Niels Jernes Vej 12, room A5-006

Nov 20, 9:00—12:00, 13:00—16:00, Niels Jernes Vej 12, room A5-006

Nov 22 (half day), 9:00—12:00, Fredrik Bajers Vej 7, room B2-107

 

Exam: Dec 6 (Half day), 9:00—12:00, Fredrik Bajers Vej 7, room B2-107


Place: 

Zip code: 

City: 

Number of seats: 50

Deadline:

Important information concerning PhD courses 
We have over some time experienced problems with no-show for both project and general courses. It has now reached a point where we are forced to take action. Therefore, the Doctoral School has decided to introduce a no-show fee of DKK 5,000 for each course where the student does not show up. Cancellations are accepted no later than 2 weeks before start of the course. Registered illness is of course an acceptable reason for not showing up on those days. Furthermore, all courses open for registration approximately three months before start. This can hopefully also provide new students a chance to register for courses during the year. We look forward to your registrations.

Welcome to Radio Resource Management for 5G New Radio

Description:

In this PhD course we will present the technology enablers for multi-service radio resource
management (RRM) in the 5G new radio (NR) as standardized by 3GPP. The system design
of NR will be presented, high-lighting the large degree of flexibility and options designing
state-of-the-art RRM algorithms to meet the future demands for managing complex multiservice
scenarios with highly diverse quality-of-service requirements. The course will cover
the following aspects:

  • Overview of QoS service architecture for the 5G NR
  • Review of the user- and control-plane protocol stack in radio part of the NR (i.e. SDAP,
  • PDCP, MAC, PHY, RRC)
  • Options for centralized and distributed network implementations of the NR
  • Agile multi-service scheduling, including MAC scheduling and its interaction with QoE manager; this part will cover the many new scheduling options for NR and how to best explore those, given the flexible frame structure
  • Non-scheduled options, also known as grant-free access
  • Optimizations specifically tailored for enhanced mobile broadband and ultra-reliable low latency communications
  • Specific RRM enablers to have NR operate with advanced beamforming and massive MIMO
  • Options for service specific link adaptation and Hybrid Automatic Repeat reQuest (HARQ) enhancements


Specific aspects will be covered by self-study, but discussed in connection with the course,
e.g. multi-node connectivity options and enhanced mobility management. The course will
present the rationales for the various design choices made by 3GPP for the NR, highlight
differences as compared to LTE, and the design choices that are left open from the 3GPP
NR specifications. In fact, the former still leaves lots of design choices open, and present a
number of new challenging research problems that remains to be addressed. To this end,
the course gives an outlook of what is coming in the next 3GPP releases of NR.

Prerequisites:
It is expected that participants in this course are familiar with the basics of the 5G NR
physical layer design as well as principles of the LTE system design.

Learning objectives:

  • General update on 5G standardisation
  • Identification of open research areas/topics
  • Specific radio resource management techniques for advanced physical layer and wireless systems with a high degree of (system) complexity

Teaching methods:
Lectures, exercises and short presentations/updates from participants (radio resource management
problem related to own research area, discussions based on self-study)

Criteria for assessment:
Active participation, with registration, and contribution to discussions, presentations and exercises.

Key literature:
Main literature will comprise overview papers/articles, excerpts from standardisation, and a
compendium of the course presentation material.



Organizer: Associate Professor Troels B. Sørensen and Professor Klaus I. Pedersen

Lecturers: Klaus I. Pedersen, Troels B. Sørensen, TBD


ECTS: 2.5

Time: November 5, 19 and 26, 2018

Place: Aalborg University

City:
Aalborg

Number of seats: 25

Deadline: October 15

Important information concerning PhD courses 
We have over some time experienced problems with no-show for both project and general courses. It has now reached a point where we are forced to take action. Therefore, the Doctoral School has decided to introduce a no-show fee of DKK 5,000 for each course where the student does not show up. Cancellations are accepted no later than 2 weeks before start of the course. Registered illness is of course an acceptable reason for not showing up on those days. Furthermore, all courses open for registration approximately three months before start. This can hopefully also provide new students a chance to register for courses during the year. We look forward to your registrations.



Welcome to Antennas, Antenna Systems and Radio Propagation for Next Generation Communication Systems (2018)


Description:

Multiple antenna systems have revolutionized wireless communications by allowing the exploitation of the space dimension for performance optimization. Recent advances have allowed the integration of multiple antennas into small devices and handsets, and paved the way for multiple input- multiple output (MIMO) systems.

 

As fourth-generation (4G) mobile communication systems are being deployed, investigation and development of 5G mobile communication systems have been started to meet the expected need for higher data rates in the future. The standardization activity of 5G is going to be finalized in 2016 and also the commercial availability of equipment is expected to be approximately in the early of 2020s. One of the key enabling techniques in 5G systems is the use of millimeter wave bands along with phased array antennas at both the mobile device and base station or for nano satellite communications. Another aspect is use of huge arrays in MIMO context (massive MIMO) which has different design and operating options due LOS vs NLOS deployments


This course will address

  • millimeter-wave antennas and their interactions with human tissues for next generation cellular communication systems and satellite communications.
  • the particulars of single or multi port antenna systems in practical small device terminals
  • electro-magnetic and signal state challenges in the design and evaluation of such multi port antennas and their associated propagation characteristics.

 

 

 The topics include:

  • Measurement methodologies for Radio propagation channels (near vs. far field conditions )
  • Measurement for antennas
  • Summarize the commonly used methods on 5G phased array antenna designs for celluar and satellite communications. Antenna element design.
  • optimization considerations for small devices and additional requirements when operated as part of a multi port antenna system
  • Channel characterization (particular attention to near field dominated scenarios, small terminals)


Prerequisites: Basic knowledge of electro-magnetics in radio terms, vector-maths, statistics and probability theory, as obtained through MSc engineering studies at Aalborg University, is expected.

(Some fundamental electro-magnetics and/or radio propagation background is desirable)


Organizer: Organizer: Shuai Zhang (sz@es.aau.dk), Patrick Eggers (pe@es.aau.dk), Jesper Ødum Nielsen (jni@es.aau.dk) 
Lecturers: Shuai Zhang, Patrick Eggers, Jesper Ødum Nielsen 

ECTS: 3.5

Time: 23-30 November 2018

Place: Aalborg University 

Zip code: 

City:
Aalborg

Number of seats:

Deadline: 16 November

Important information concerning PhD courses
 We have over some time experienced problems with no-show for both project and general courses. It has now reached a point where we are forced to take action. Therefore, the Doctoral School has decided to introduce a no-show fee of DKK 5,000 for each course where the student does not show up. Cancellations are accepted no later than 2 weeks before start of the course. Registered illness is of course an acceptable reason for not showing up on those days. Furthermore, all courses open for registration approximately three months before start. This can hopefully also provide new students a chance to register for courses during the year. We look forward to your registrations.

Welcome to Coding for Wireless Channels


Description:

This is a 3-day course, covering the coding/decoding methods and emphasizing the aspects specific for the wireless communications. The goal is to provide understanding and insights into the fundamental aspects and modern developments of the coding theory and discuss their applicability in the challenges faced by the emerging wireless communication systems. Initially, fundamentals like modeling of noisy channels and limits on the rate of communication are covered, along with the coding requirements in wireless systems. We then present some of the most successful coding schemes that are results of recent research efforts. We also deal with the techniques relevant to the multiple access channels, inherent to wireless communications. Finally, we conclude the course with the presentation of the results from the emerging field of finite-blocklength information theory, relevant for short packet communications that are characteristic for machine-type services.

The course will bring knowledge on both mature solutions, already widely used today, and more cutting-edge solutions with high research activity.

 

Contents:

  • Introduction and motivation: channel models, channel capacity, why do we need codes and how to use them, basics of coding and decoding algorithms.
  • Linear codes. Encoding, decoding and measures of reliability.
  • Convolutional codes, trellis representation and decoding on a trellis. Trellis coded modulation.
  • Introduction to codes-on-graphs and iterative decoding algorithms.
  • Turbo codes.
  • Coding for multiple access channels.
  • Coded random access.
  • Finite-blocklength information theory.
  • Coding for short-packets.

 

Prerequisites:

Basics of information theory and digital communications, probability theory, stochastic processes.

Learning objectives:

Understanding of classic information-theoretic models of wireless communications and of their limitations. Understanding of finite-blocklength information-theoretic models. Understanding and working knowledge of the relevant coding schemes: linear block- and convolutional-codes, codes-on-graphs, and iterative decoding algorithms.

Teaching methods:

Lectures. Presentations by students.

 

Criteria for assessment:

The attendees will be assessed based on the presentation of the beforehand assigned topics.

Key literature:

  • KTH – Coding for wireless communications, course notes
  • Georg Böcherer – Lecture Notes on Channel Coding, https://arxiv.org/pdf/1607.00974v1.pdf
  • V. Guruswami – Introduction to coding, course notes
  • B. Sklar – Digital Communications: fundamentals and applications, Prentice Hall, 2001
  • David J. C. MacKay, Information Theory, Inference & Learning Algorithms, Cambridge University Press, 2003
  • E. Biglieri, Coding for Wireless Channels, Springer 2007
  • T. Richardson, R. Urbanke, Modern Coding Theory, Cambridge University Press 2008
  • Y. Polyanskiy, H. V. Poor and S. Verdú, "Channel coding rate in the finite blocklength regime," IEEE Trans. Inf. Theory, vol. 56, no. 5, pp. 2307-2359, May 2010.



Organizer: Associate Professor Cedomir Stefanovic cs@es.aau.dk


Lecturers: Cedomir Stefanovic, Kasper Fløe Trillingsgaard, Petar Popovski


ECTS: 1.5

Time: 12-14 November 2018

Place: Copenhagen Campus

Zip code: 

City: 

Number of seats: 15


Deadline: 22 October 2018

Important information concerning PhD courses 
We have over some time experienced problems with no-show for both project and general courses. It has now reached a point where we are forced to take action. Therefore, the Doctoral School has decided to introduce a no-show fee of DKK 5,000 for each course where the student does not show up. Cancellations are accepted no later than 2 weeks before start of the course. Registered illness is of course an acceptable reason for not showing up on those days. Furthermore, all courses open for registration approximately three months before start. This can hopefully also provide new students a chance to register for courses during the year. We look forward to your registrations.

Welcome to Ultra-reliable low-latency communications: principles and building blocks


Description:

Topic, background and motivation for the course:

 

Ultra-reliable low-latency communications (URLLC) are novel service category, foreseen as one of the basic service categories foreseen 5G networks and beyond. URLLC are seen as the main enabler of mission-critical services, like industrial monitoring and control, autonomous and assisted driving, disaster management etc. URLLC are characterized with stringent latency (< 10 ms) and reliability (> 99.999 %), posing remarkable challenges to wireless system design and the research on URLLC is still in its infancy. The goal of this course to provide understanding of information- and communication-theoretic fundamentals of URLLC, as well as of the approaches to communication system design that will foster URLLC.

 

Contents:

  • Introduction: Basic characteristics of URLLC, URLLC and vertical industries, Overview of on-going standardization.
  • Communication-theoretic principles: Communication model for URLLC: metadata, auxiliary procedures and protocol exchanges, Stochastic models for URLLC.
  • PHY layer: Multi-antenna diversity, Interface diversity.
  • Packetization and the impact of finite-blocklength.
  • Link layer: Advanced medium access protocols. Coordinated grant-free access schemes.
  • Advanced network architectures for URLLC: Network densification. Cloud and fog RAN

 

Prerequisites:

Basics of information theory and digital communications, probability theory, stochastic processes.

Learning objectives:

Understanding of the information- and communication-theoretic models of URLLC. Understanding and working knowledge on advanced physical and link layer schemes tailored for URLLC communications.

 

Teaching methods:

Lectures. Presentations by students.

 

Criteria for assessment:

The attendees will be assessed based on the presentation of the beforehand assigned topics.

Key literature:

  • G. Durisi, T. Koch and P. Popovski, "Toward Massive, Ultrareliable, and Low-Latency Wireless Communication With Short Packets," in Proceedings of the IEEE, vol. 104, no. 9, pp. 1711-1726, September 2016.
  • P. Popovski et al, “Ultra-Reliable Low-Latency Communication (URLLC): Principles and Building Blocks”, https://arxiv.org/abs/1708.07862
  • H. Ji, S. Park, J. Yeo, Y. Kim, J. Lee, B. Shim, “Introduction to Ultra Reliable and Low Latency Communications in 5G”, https://arxiv.org/abs/1704.05565
  • Y. Polyanskiy, H. V. Poor and S. Verdú, "Channel coding rate in the finite blocklength regime," IEEE Trans. Inf. Theory, vol. 56, no. 5, pp. 2307-2359, May 2010.
  • 3GPP, “Service requirements for the 5G system,” 3rd Generation Partnership Project (3GPP), TS 22.261 v16.0.0, 06 2017.
  • 3GPP, “Study on Scenarios and Requirements for Next Generation Access Technologies”, TR 38.913 v14.3.0 2017.
  • L. Jing, E. D. Carvalho, P. Popovski, and A. O. Martınez, “Design and performance analysis of noncoherent detection systems with massive receiver arrays,” IEEE Trans. Signal Process., vol. 64, no. 19, pp. 5000 – 5010, Oct. 2016.



Organizer: Associate Professor Cedomir Stefanovic cs@es.aau.dk


Lecturers: Cedomir Stefanovic, Petar Popovski, Elisabeth de Carvalho, Jimmy Jessen Nielsen, Dong Min Kim, Kasper Fløe Trillingsgaard


ECTS: 3

Time: 4 - 6 December 2018

Place: Aalborg campus

City: 
Aalborg

Number of seats: 15

Deadline: 13 November 2018

Important information concerning PhD courses 
We have over some time experienced problems with no-show for both project and general courses. It has now reached a point where we are forced to take action. Therefore, the Doctoral School has decided to introduce a no-show fee of DKK 5,000 for each course where the student does not show up. Cancellations are accepted no later than 2 weeks before start of the course. Registered illness is of course an acceptable reason for not showing up on those days. Furthermore, all courses open for registration approximately three months before start. This can hopefully also provide new students a chance to register for courses during the year. We look forward to your registrations.