Welcome to Design Research - Epistemologies and Methods

Course description: This PhD course aim to provide a profound understanding amongst the participants with respect to how their project is located within various positions and schools of thought. The course focuses in particular on the two levels of epistemology and method providing insight into philosophy of science as well as specific issues of methodology. The underpinning idea is to get participants to understand how the way they produce new knowledge within design research is related to the research design and the methods applied. The course will both provide a general level of knowledge about theories of science and relevant methods, as well as it will put focus on experimental, pragmatic and empirical research with end user experience as the pivotal theme.

Prerequisites: Prioritized enrollment as PhD student under the Technical Doctoral School of IT and Design but open for all regardless of discipline provided there are vacant seats.

Learning objectives: The course participants will obtain oversight-knowledge about general issues and schools of thought within design research epistemology and method. The course participants will obtain competences in identifying their research project in relation to its epistemological context. The course participants will develop skills in analyzing and reflecting over the relation between epistemology and method within their research project.

Teaching methods: The course is divided into lectures, participant's research project presentation, workshops, and plenary discussions.

Criteria for assessment: Participants are expected to read the ‘A’ literature before the course, present their projects with specific emphasis on epistemology and methodology (research design), be actively participating in discussions during the course, and post-course submission of a written essay assignment (in case of the 5 ECTS option).

Readings (A = primary readings to be read in advance of the course, B = inspiration)

A Readings (will be accessible in PhD Moodle prior to the course)

Delanty, G. & P. Strydon (eds.) (2003) Philosophies of Social Science. The Classic and contemporary readings, Maidenhead: Open University Press, pp. 1-12

Fallan. K. (2008) Architecture in Action. Travelling with Actor-Network Theory in the land of architectural research, Architectural Theory Review, 13(1), 80-96

Groath, L. & D. Wang (2013) Architectural Research Methods, Hoboken: Wiley, 2nd Edition, pp. 63-99 (Chapter 3)

Jensen, O. B. (2014) Designing Mobilities, Aalborg: Aalborg University Press, pp. 38-53 (Chapter 3)

Jensen, O. B. & D. B. Lanng (2017) Mobilities Design, Routledge: London, pp. 26-41 (chapter 2)

Latour, B. (1992) ‘‘Where Are the Missing Masses? The Sociology of a Few Mundane Artifacts’’ in Wiebe E. Bijker and John Law, eds., Shaping Technology/Building Society: Studies in Sociotechnical Change (Cambridge, Mass.: MIT Press, 1992), pp. 225–258

Yaneva, A. (2017) Five Ways of Making Architecture Political. An Introduction to the Politics of Design Practice, London: Bloomsbury, pp. 31-52 (Chapter 2: How to Study Ecology of Practice)

B Readings

Degen, M., G. Rose & B. Basdas (2010) Bodies and everyday practices in designed urban environments Science Studies, vol. 23, no. 2, pp. 60-76

Delanty, G. & P. Strydon (eds.) (2003) Philosophies of Social Science. The Classic and contemporary readings, Maidenhead: Open University Press

Dunne, A. & F. Raby (2013) Speculative Everything. Design, Fiction, and Social Dreaming, Cambridge Mass.: MIT Press

Fallan, K. (2010) Design History. Understanding Theory and Method, Oxford: Berg

Fraser, M. (ed.) (2013) Design Research in Architecture. An Overview, Farnham: Ashgate

Groath, L. & D. Wang (2013) Architectural Research Methods, Hoboken: Wiley, 2nd Edition

Gänshirt, C. (2007) Tools for Ideas. An Introduction to Architectural Design, Basel: Birkhäuser

Jensen, O. B. (Ed.) (2010) Design Research Epistemologies I – Research in Architectural Design, Aalborg: Department of Architecture, Design and Media Technology

Jensen, O. B., T. V. Olsen, J. B. Mikkelsen & S. Wind (eds.)(2016) Design Research Epistemologies II, Aalborg: Departmental Working Paper Series, Department of Architecture, Design and Media Technology, Aalborg University, vol. 92

Jensen, O. B. (2016) Of ‘other’ materialities: why (mobilities) design is central to the future of mobilities research, Mobilities, vol. 11, no. 4, pp. 587-597, http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/17450101.2016.1211826

Jensen, O. B., D. B. Lanng & S. Wind (2016) Mobilities Design – towards a research agenda for applied mobilities research, Applied Mobilities, vol. 1, no. 1, 26-42

Latour, B. & A. Yaneva (2008) "Give me a gun and I will make all buildings move": An ANT's vies of Architecture, in Geiser, R. (Ed.) (2008) Explorations in Architecture: Teaching, Design, Research, Basel: Birkhäuser, pp. 80-89

Lawson, B. (2004) What designers know, London: Architectural Press

Levitas, R. (2013) Utopia as Method. The Imaginary Reconstitution of Society, Basingstoke: Palgrave

Gunn, W., T. Otto & R. C. Smith (Eds.) (2013) Design Anthropology. Theory & Practice, London: Bloomsbury

Naisbitt, K. (1996) Introduction, in Nesbitt, K. (ed.) (1996) Theorizing A New Agenda for Architecture Theory. An anthology of Architectural Theory 1965-1995, New York: Princeton Architectural Press

Otto, T. & R. C. Smith (2013) Design Anthropology: A Distinct Style of Knowing, in W. Gunn, T. Otto & R. C. Smith (Eds.) (2013) Design Anthropology. Theory & Practice, London: Bloomsbury

Yaneva, A. (2005) Scaling Up and Down: Extraction Trials in Architectural Design, Social Studies of Science, 35/6, December 2005, 867-894

Yaneva, A. (2009) Making the social hold: Towards an Actor-Network Theory of Design, Design and Culture, Vol. 1, Issue 3, pp. 273-388

Yaneva, A. (2017) Five Ways of Making Architecture Political. An Introduction to the Politics of Design Practice, London: Bloomsbury

Vannini, P. (ed.) Non-Representational Research Methodologies. Re-Envisioning Research, London: Routledge

Organizer: Professor Ole B. Jensen, Department of Architecture, Design & Media Technology, AAU

Lecturer: Professor Ole B. Jensen

Date: April 23-25, 2018, starting on 23 April at 10:00

Credits: 3 ECTS or 5 ECTS if an assignment of 10-15 normal pages is submitted after the course

Place: AAU, Rendsburggade 14, Aalborg, room 4.531

Max. number of participants: 15

Deadline for registration: One month before the course

Important information concerning PhD courses We have over some time experienced problems with no-show for both project and general courses. It has now reached a point where we are forced to take action. Therefore, the Doctoral School has decided to introduce a no-show fee of DKK 5,000 for each course where the student does not show up. Cancellations are accepted no later than 2 weeks before start of the course. Registered illness is of course an acceptable reason for not showing up on those days. Furthermore, all courses open for registration approximately three months before start. This can hopefully also provide new students a chance to register for courses during the year. We look forward to your registrations.

 

Welcome to Theories of Science

Description: The aim of this course is for the doctoral student to reach an understanding of some main positions within Theories of Science, with a particular reference to the natural sciences, technology and mathematics and their interplay in what can be referred to as techno-science. The end goal is that course participants will increase their level of reflexivity of themselves as ‘knowledge producers’. The course takes its point of departure in philosophic and epistemological positions within philosophy of science. A particular attention will be directed towards the social and economic conditions under which knowledge is produced and codified, and how this knowledge production interacts with the domain of sciences, technology and mathematics. This includes a historical overview of the transit from a conception of science to a conception of techno-science and the identification of new modes for knowledge roduction. Course participants will receive a list of literature for the course and during the course more material will be presented and discussed. The course participants are expected to actively participate in the course activities in the form of presentations, group discussions etc.

Organizer: Associate Professor Ole Ravn, Aalborg University, e-mail: orc@learning.aau.dk

Lecturers: Professor Emeritus Ole Skovsmose and Associate Professor Ole Ravn

ECTS: 2.5

Time: August 2018 (dates to be announced)

Place:

City: 9220 Aalborg Øst

Number of seats: 36

Deadline: 

Important information concerning PhD courses We have over some time experienced problems with no-show for both project and general courses. It has now reached a point where we are forced to take action. Therefore, the Doctoral School has decided to introduce a no-show fee of DKK 5,000 for each course where the student does not show up. Cancellations are accepted no later than 2 weeks before start of the course. Registered illness is of course an acceptable reason for not showing up on those days. Furthermore, all courses open for registration approximately three months before start. This can hopefully also provide new students a chance to register for courses during the year. We look forward to your registrations.

Welcome to Interaction Design Research: A Human Centered Approach to Design

Description: The PhD course will enable participants to research, analysis, prototype, evaluate and re-design considering the whole system within its social, critical and cultural contexts of use. Participants will be introduced to practice-based theories of expert practitioners and leading figures in the field with case studies of their work. Working in teams, the participants will then have the opportunity to implement and adapt these practical methods into their own projects. The course is highly collaborative integrating hands–on prototyping and testing with basic research and testing techniques, into every stage of the design and interaction design process. Participants will create rapid prototypes, developed, iterated and presented on a session by session basis via a hands-on, studio-based set of exercises that address human-centered concept exploration, implementation, evaluation and redesign.

Organizer: Assistant Professor Hendrik Knoche, e-mail: hk@create.aau.dk

Lecturers:

ECTS: 3, but can be 5 if students make a post-course submission of a written essay assignment

Time: 19-23 March 2018

Place: Aalborg University, Niels Jernes Vej 6, room NJV6A 1.26 

City: 9220  Aalborg Øst

Number of seats: 30

Deadline: 26 February 2018

Important information concerning PhD courses We have over some time experienced problems with no-show for both project and general courses. It has now reached a point where we are forced to take action. Therefore, the Doctoral School has decided to introduce a no-show fee of DKK 5,000 for each course where the student does not show up. Cancellations are accepted no later than 2 weeks before start of the course. Registered illness is of course an acceptable reason for not showing up on those days. Furthermore, all courses open for registration approximately three months before start. This can hopefully also provide new students a chance to register for courses during the year. We look forward to your registrations.

Welcome to An Introduction to Qualitative Methods

Description: As the study of many scientific, technological and educational processes touches upon human beings and society, qualitative research methods are important tools for approaching the understanding and interpretation of these phenomena. Although reseaching qualities is part of the way in which different natural sciences and fields of engineering address some of their objects of study, the dominance of quantitative methods is dominant in these fields. The qualitative research methodologies addressed in this course are rooted in the traditions of the humanities and social sciences. The palette of qualitative methodologies is broad and its uses are varied in diverse fields of research. The course is specially designed for students in the first year of their studies. The course is suitable for students whose project is at the intersection of sciences and technology, and the human/social fields as the object of study and concern involves people and their relation with science and technology.

The course aims at: Offering an overview of the main assumptions and issues at stake when carrying qualitative research. Providing a frame for discussing the students’ own methodological design. Providing feedback on students’ problems and necessities regarding their methodological design when involving qualitative research methods.

Organizer: Professor Lars Bo Henriksen, email: lbh@plan.aau.dk

Lecturers: Professor Lars Bo Henriksen, Professor Kenneth Mølbjerg Jørgensen

ECTS: 3

Time: 22-24 August 2018

Place:  Rendsburggade 14, room Rdb 14.3.463

City: 9000  Aalborg

Number of seats: 30

Deadline: 1 August 2018

 

Important information concerning PhD courses We have over some time experienced problems with no-show for both project and general courses. It has now reached a point where we are forced to take action. Therefore, the Doctoral School has decided to introduce a no-show fee of DKK 5,000 for each course where the student does not show up. Cancellations are accepted no later than 2 weeks before start of the course. Registered illness is of course an acceptable reason for not showing up on those days. Furthermore, all courses open for registration approximately three months before start. This can hopefully also provide new students a chance to register for courses during the year. We look forward to your registrations.

Welcome to Ethics and Social Responsibilities for Scientists and Engineers in the 21st Century


Description: The course addresses ethical dilemmas that researchers might face in turbulent times, where clear-cut distinctions between pure and applied science can no longer be upheld, and try to create a space where the participating PhD students can qualify their reflections on their role as young researchers by drawing on philosophical, sociological, and ethical perspectives in analyzing possibilities and problems of contemporary science, engineering and technology. During the course the participants are asked to ethically analyze their own PhD projects, and present their analyses. To facilitate the ethical analyses of PhD projects a number of topical case-studies and relevant analytical tools are presented.

You will find all course information here on Moodle. You will find the texts and the tasks for each day in one folder.

The course is designed so that each day is split up into two sessions: One before lunch and one after. Usually a session begins with a lecture (90 minutes, including breaks) followed by discussions or group work.

During the last session on the third day participants are kindly asked to do a PP presentation on ethical issues in their Ph.D. project (duration: no more than 15 minutes). We will use the group work and discussions during the first two days to qualify your presentation. It is, however a good idea, to begin reflecting on ethical issues in your project when you read the course material.

Reading the text material connected to the lectures, and preparing a PP presentation on ethical aspects of your Ph.D. project, are mandatory activities for all participants.

I hope you will have some enlightening and reflective days.

Best Regards Tom Børsen

Organizer: Associate professor Tom Børsen, Aalborg University, email: boersen@plan.aau.dk

Lecturers: Professor Lars Bo Henriksen, Professor Kenneth Mølbjerg Jørgensen


ECTS: 2.5

Time: 5-7 December 2018, 9:00-16:00

Place: Frederikskaj 10A, building D, room 3.132

Zip code:
2450

City:
Copenhagen

Number of seats: 30

Deadline: 14 November 2018

Important information concerning PhD courses We have over some time experienced problems with no-show for both project and general courses. It has now reached a point where we are forced to take action. Therefore, the Doctoral School has decided to introduce a no-show fee of DKK 5,000 for each course where the student does not show up. Cancellations are accepted no later than 2 weeks before start of the course. Registered illness is of course an acceptable reason for not showing up on those days. Furthermore, all courses open for registration approximately three months before start. This can hopefully also provide new students a chance to register for courses during the year. We look forward to your registrations.