Welcome to Predictive musculoskeletal modeling


Description: This Ph.D. course introduces a number of musculoskeletal modeling techniques that work with a minimum of experimental input and therefore are useful for predictive simulation, i.e. simulation of situations that may occur in the future. The course uses the AnyBody Modeling System throughout. Prior user experience with this system is a significant advantage for participation in the course.

Each participant must bring a reasonably modern Windows laptop. An AnyBody license will be provided for installation prior to the course. A basic understanding of linear algebra and calculus is a prerequisite for participation.

Two weeks prior to the course, licenses for the AnyBody Modeling System will be distributed. The participants have to install the software and complete the two tutorials Getting Started and Getting Started with AnyScript as homework before the course.

Monday:

Fundamentals of musculoskeletal modeling

  • Musculoskeletal modeling methods
  • AnyBody installation and introduction
  • Basic structure and operation of AnyBody
  • Structure of advanced models

Tuesday

Advanced kinematics

  • Over-determinate kinematics
  • Parameter estimation from kinematics
  • Workflow for motion capture data

Wednesday

Prediction of joint behavior

  • Force-dependent kinematics
  • Modeling of non-conforming joints

Thursday

Subject-specific and population-based models

  • Scaling methods
  • Morphing
  • Muscle parameter calibration
  • Population-based modeling

Friday

Predictive models of activities of daily living

  • Prediction of ground reaction forces
  • Motion prediction with optimization
  • Motion prediction with over-determinate kinematics
  • Movement prediction based on optimum control
  • Introduction of assignment


Organizer: Professor John Rasmussen e-mail: jr@m-tech.aau.dk


Lecturers: Professor John Rasmussen (JR), Associate Professor Mark de Zee (MdZ), Associate ProfessorMichael Skipper Andersen (MSA)

ECTS: 4

Time: 27  –  31 March 2017, every day 9:00-16:00

Place: Department of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering

Zip code: 

City: 

Number of seats: 30

Deadline: 1 March 2017

Important information concerning PhD courses:
We have over some time experienced problems with no-show for both project and general courses. It has now reached a point where we are forced to take action. Therefore, the Doctoral School has decided to introduce a no-show fee of DKK 5,000 for each course where the student does not show up. Cancellations are accepted no later than 2 weeks before start of the course. Registered illness is of course an acceptable reason for not showing up on those days. Furthermore, all courses open for registration approximately three months before start. This can hopefully also provide new students a chance to register for courses during the year. We look forward to your registrations.



Welcome to Lean and the Work Environment

CANCELLED DUE TO TOO FEW PARTICIPANTS

Description: It is difficult to develop production processes that at the same time are socially, healthy and economically viable in the long run. When achieved, such production processes can be called ‘sustainable’ - sustainable in the sense that products or services are competitive and socially accepted and employees are innovative and work in a healthy environment where they can continue also when they get of age. Although contested, the application of lean may open possibilities for the practical development of sustainable processes with a health working environment. Lean is widely applied in manufacturing industry and getting a growing importance in private and public services. Although the concept is well developed, the practical implementation is difficult for many organisations, and lean has a somewhat tainted reputation among international researcher and employees as a cause of increased stress and work intensity. However, it is a strong tool for getting insight into core activities and for subsequent process improvements. Implemented in the right way under the right conditions, lean may thereby function as tool for developing sustainable production processes.

Prerequisites:

Relevant Phd-study

Learning objectives:

  • Participants understand the concept of sustainable production processes
  • Participants understand the lean concept and the advantages and disadvantages of lean
  • Participants understand how lean can be used in the development of sustainable production processes
  • Students are able to relate lean and sustainable production processes to their own research projects

Teaching methods:

Combination of lectures, group discussions and Phd-study presentations

Criteria for assessment:

Full active participation in course
Relevant and qualified presentation of own research

Key literature:

Adler, P.S., Heckscher, C., & Prusak, L. 2011. Building a Collaborative Enterprise. Harvard Business Review, 89, (7-8) 94-101.

Conti, R., Angelis, J., Cooper, C., Faragher, B., & Gill, C. 2006. The effects of lean production on worker job stress. International Journal of Operations & Production Management, 26, (9) 1013-1038.

Hasle, P. 2014. Lean production - an evaluation of the possibilities for an employee supportive lean practice. Human Factors and Ergonomics in Manufacturing & Service Industries, 24, (1) 40-53.

Hasle, P., Bojesen, A., Jensen, P.L., & Bramming, P. 2012. Lean and the working environment – a review of the literature. International Journal of Operations & Production Management, 32, (7) 829-849.

Holweg, M. 2007. The genealogy of lean production. Journal of Operations Management, 25, (2) 420-437.

Liker, J.K. 2004. The Toyota way - 14 management principles from the world's greatest manufacturer New York, McGraw Hill.

Neumann, W.P. & Dul, J. 2010. Human factors: spanning the gap between OM and HRM. International Journal of Operations & Production Management, 30, (9) 923-950.

Pfeffer, J. 2010. Building Sustainable Organizations: The Human Factor. Academy of Management Perspectives, 24, (1) 34-45.

Morgen Witzel: From scientific management to management science. Chapter 9 (p. 177-197) in: A history of management thought. Routhledge, Taylor and Francis Group, London and New York, 2011.

Mumford, E . 2006. The story of socio-technical design: reflections on its successes, failures and potential. Information Systems Journal, 16, (4) 317-342.

Trist, E. 1981. The evolution of socio-technical systems – a conceptual framwork and an action research program. Occasional paper no. 2. Ontario Ministry of Labour, Ontario Quality of Working life Centre, Toronto. Accessed thorough: http://www.lmmiller.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2013/06/The-Evolution-of-Socio-Technical-Systems-Trist.pdf

Westgaard, R.H. & Winkel, J. 2011. Occupational musculoskeletal and mental health: Significance of rationalization and opportunities to create sustainable production systems - A systematic review. Applied Ergonomics, 42, (2) 261-296.

Womack, J.P. & Jones, D.T. 1996. Lean thinking New York, Simon & Schuster.



Organizer: Professor Peter Hasle & Associate Professor Anders Paarup Nielsen, CIP I samarbejde med NIVA (Nordic Institute for Advanced Training in Occupational Health)



Lecturers: Professor Peter Hasle and Associate Professor Anders Paarup Nielsen. More will probably be added.



ECTS: 3.5

Time: 3. - 6. April 2017

Place: 

Zip code: 

City: 

Number of seats: 25

Deadline: 13. March 2017


Important information concerning PhD courses: We have over some time experienced problems with no-show for both project and general courses. It has now reached a point where we are forced to take action. Therefore, the Doctoral School has decided to introduce a no-show fee of DKK 5,000 for each course where the student does not show up. Cancellations are accepted no later than 2 weeks before start of the course. Registered illness is of course an acceptable reason for not showing up on those days. Furthermore, all courses open for registration approximately three months before start. This can hopefully also provide new students a chance to register for courses during the year. We look forward to your registrations.



Welcome to Perspectives of Industry 4.0

 

Description: The Danish, as well as the European manufacturing is under pressure and change. High production cost makes it harder for Danish manufacturing companies to justify maintaining production in Denmark. Instead production is moved to areas with a significantly lower salary level (e.g Eastern Europe or China).

Simultaneously, significant developments in science and technology (IT, mechatronics, materials technology, etc.) are made, constantly providing manufacturing companies new possibilities for the development of new products, processes and services.

To be competitive, it is necessary for companies to develop new products, processes and services with ever increasing frequency. Timing, exploitation and implementation of new technologies is essential. If this happens too early or too late can have consequences for the competitiveness of enterprises and ultimately threaten their survival.

Governments in many countries have initiated a number of research and development programs that are designed to meet the above challenges in manufacturing.

One of these initiatives is the German "Industry 4.0" initiative (4 Industrial Revolution), where the government is working with large companies and stakeholders as FESTO, SAP, SIEMENS, Daimler, Volkswagen and others to formulate and realize a vision for the future production. The budget for Industry 4.0 is over 400 million euros. Similar initiatives have started in the United States (Advanced Manufacturing), EU (Factory-of-the-future), Sweden etc.

Common to these initiatives is that they are based on the hypothesis that the challenges can be met through the use of innovation from IT and mechatronic area where the ekspotientielle growth in processing power as well as innovations such as "Internet-of-things", "Cyber-Physical Systems" "collaborative robots", "Big data", "Cloud computing", etc. will give manufacturing a wide range of new opportunities.

In this course, we will discuss the perspectives and contents of Industry 4.0.

Prerequisites: An interest in the future of manufacturing.

Learning objectives:

- provide an overview of the contents of Industry 4.0 (and equivalent initiatives)

- give insights into some of the technologies related to Industry 4.0. E.g:

  • Internet of things
  • Big data
  • Cyber physical systems
  • Reconfigurable manufacturing systems
  • Virtual manufacturing

- discuss the potential and limitations of the Industry 4.0 vision.

Teaching methods:

The course will consists of a number of lectures divided into 3 parts:

Part 1: Industry 4.0: Fundamentals and basics

Part 2: Modeling, Simulation, Implementation and Verification

Part 3: Applications of Industry 4.0 in real environments


The curriculum draft covers round ten days of total duration and contains 22 lecture topics and one combined lecture set of six application discussions.


Criteria for assessment: The participants will be asked to write a short report on a relevant Industry 4.0 topic of their choice.

 

Organizer: Professor Ole Madsen, email: om@m-tech.aau.dk and Professor Charles Møller, email: charles@business.aau.dk

Lecturers: Main lecturer Prof. Dr.-Ing. Ulrich Berger (Full Professor (University) Director of the Institute of Automation Technology Brandenburg Technical University Cottbus-Senftenberg).

ECTS: 3

Time: 28., 29. and 30. March 2017, each day from 9:00 to 16:00

Place: Pontoppidanstræde 103, room 4-106

Zip code:

City:

Number of seats: 15

Deadline: 7. March 2017

Important information concerning PhD courses: We have over some time experienced problems with no-show for both project and general courses. It has now reached a point where we are forced to take action. Therefore, the Doctoral School has decided to introduce a no-show fee of DKK 5,000 for each course where the student does not show up. Cancellations are accepted no later than 2 weeks before start of the course. Registered illness is of course an acceptable reason for not showing up on those days. Furthermore, all courses open for registration approximately three months before start. This can hopefully also provide new students a chance to register for courses during the year. We look forward to your registrations.

Welcome to Modeling Frameworks for Discrete Optimization Problems

 

Description: The course will address topics of optimization of discrete problems. Special emphasis will be given to transportation and scheduling problems and their formulation as Constraint Logic Programming problems. The students will also be introduced to a solution approach in Oz Mozart or similar software and various solution strategies for solving small and large optimization problems. The practical examples will focus on autonomous automated systems e.g. AGVs and mobile robots. The course is for students who would like a deeper insight into discrete problems and their solution or for students looking for a greater insight into solving transportation or scheduling problems.

Prerequisites: Master’s degree in Industrial Engineering, Operations Research, Applied Operations Research, Computer Science, Mathematics or similar.

Specifically a background in linear algebra and basic programming skills are required.

Learning objectives:

  • Be able to model discrete transportation and scheduling problems,
  • Understanding and formulating problems using Constraint Logic Programming,
  • Formulating and solving simple problems in Oz Mozart,
  • Understanding search strategies and their various advantages and disadvantages and be able to choose an appropriate strategy,
  • Understanding NP hard vs. NP complete problems and challenges associated with solving these types of problems,
  • Gain insight and be introduced to different kinds of distribution networks while providing insights on how to manage supply chains and logistics networks,
  • Understanding Discrete-Event Systems driven Decision Support Systems used in modern management, industrial engineering, and computer science,
  • Understanding and formulating production flow problems in the framework of Petri nets. 
  • Understanding robustness and strategies for investigating this.

Teaching methods: The course will be structured around lectures with dedicated exercise workshops to formulate and solve problem instances.

Criteria for assessment: The students will be evaluated based on the handed in exercises as completed as part of the course. We expect the finished exercises will require some additional work and that they will be handed in one week after the final lecture.

Key literature:

  1. Bocewicz, G., Nielsen, I., Banaszak, Z., Iterative multimodal processes scheduling (2014) Annual Reviews in Control, 38 (1), pp. 113-122.
  2. Dolgui A., Proth J-M., Supply Chain Engineering (Useful Methods and Techniques), Springer-Verlag, London, 2010, ISBN 978-1-84996-017-5, 541 pp.
  3. Van Roy P., Haridi S., Concepts, Techniques, and Models of Computer Programming, MIT Press 2004, 900 pp.
  4. Schulte CH., Smolka G., Wurtz J.: Finite Domain Constraint Programming in Oz, DFKI OZ documentation series, German Research Center for Artificial Intelligence, Stuhlsaltzenhausweg 3, D-66123 Saarbrucken, Germany, 1998.
  5. Józefowska J., Węglarz J., (Eds.) Perspectives in Modern Project Scheduling, Springer Science+Buisness Media, LLC, USA, 2006, ISBN-10 0-387-33643-5 (HB), 444 pp.
  6. Banaszak Z., Bocewicz G., Decision Support Driven Models and Algorithms of Artificial Intelligence, Management Sciences Series, vol. 1, WUT, Warsaw, 2011,  ISBN 978-83-63370-00-8, 235 pp.
  7. Banasza,k Z., Bocewicz G., Declarative Modeling Driven Approach to Production Orders Portfolio Prototyping, w: New Frontiers in Information and Production Systems Modelling and Analysis / Różewski Przemysław [i in.] , Intelligent Systems Reference Library, vol. 98, 2016, Springer International Publishing, ISBN 978-3-319-23337-6, pp. 141-168.

Organizer: Associate Professor Peter Nielsen, email: peter@m-tech.aau.dk

Lecturers: Grzegorz Bocewicz, Dr. Tech. Professor, Dean Koszalin University of Technology, Gang Chen, AAU, M-tech, Peter Nielsen, AAU, M-tech, and  Zbigniew Banaszak, Dr. Tech. Professor, Warsaw University of Technology

ECTS: 4

Time: 4. - 7. September 2017

Place:

Zip code:

City:

Number of seats: 12

Deadline: 14. August 2017

Important information concerning PhD courses: We have over some time experienced problems with no-show for both project and general courses. It has now reached a point where we are forced to take action. Therefore, the Doctoral School has decided to introduce a no-show fee of DKK 5,000 for each course where the student does not show up. Cancellations are accepted no later than 2 weeks before start of the course. Registered illness is of course an acceptable reason for not showing up on those days. Furthermore, all courses open for registration approximately three months before start. This can hopefully also provide new students a chance to register for courses during the year. We look forward to your registrations.

PHD Course - 2017 - Fracture Mechanics for Laminated Composite Structure....pdfPHD Course - 2017 - Fracture Mechanics for Laminated Composite Structure....pdf

Welcome to the Ph.D. course on

Fracture Mechanics for Laminated Composite Structures

Description: Fracture mechanics and cohesive zone modeling are methods that are increasing in importance within industries that are utilizing laminated composite materials. Striving for better and better performance is the driver both within academia and industry application of these methods. A PhD-course providing tools for applying and implementing these methods, as well as a platform for meeting peers with interest in the same area is an excellent opportunity for young researchers.

Time: 13 - 17 November 2017

Place: Department of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, Aalborg University, Fibigerstræde 16, DK-9220 Aalborg, Denmark.

ECTS: 5

Number of seats: 40

Organized by
Department of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, Aalborg University (www.m-tech.aau.dk)
Aalborg University, The Faculty of Engineering and Science, The Doctoral School of Engineering and Science, (http://www.phd.teknat.aau.dk/)

Associate Professor Esben Lindgaard (elo@m-tech.aau.dk)
Associate Professor Jens Henrik Andreasen (jha@m-tech.aau.dk)
Assistant Professor Brian Bak (brianbak@m-tech.aau.dk) Department of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, Aalborg University

In collaboration with
DCAMM, Danish Center for Applied Mathematics and Mechanics (www.dcamm.dk).
DCCSM, Danish Centre for Composite Structures and Materials for Wind Turbines.

Course Content
This Ph.D. course will concentrate on theory and practice related to fracture mechanical problems for laminated composite structures, such as wind turbine blades. The classical approach to fracture mechanics will be presented and extended to anisotropic and bi-material problems via analytical and numerical methods including the framework of cohesive zone modeling. Furthermore, practical aspects of laboratory testing in relation to determination of fracture mechanical properties will be covered and included in the exercises for the course as experiments. The course consists of four parts; lectures, exercises, laboratory testing, and an informal poster session. The net work load corresponds to 5 ECTS. The exercises will consist of analytical problems solved using math programs such as Maple, numerical problems solved using the Finite Element Program ANSYS, and laboratory exercises conducted in the Lab of AAU. For the poster session all participants are expected to upload a poster of their own work, project or similar, which include discussion of how fracture mechanics apply. This poster should be uploaded to the organizers a week before the start of the course.

Topics include:

  • Classical fracture mechanics
  • Bi-material fracture mechanics
  • Anisotropic materials
  • Numerical estimation of fracture mechanical parameters with the finite element method (FEM)
  • R-curve effects
  • Crack bridging
  • Cohesive zone modeling
  • Numerical implementation of cohesive zone models in FEM
  • Experimental estimation of fracture mechanical properties
  • Fatigue properties of laminated composites


The aim of the course is to provide the participants with a toolbox of theoretical knowledge, experimental insight, and competencies in numerical analyses that can be applied in the participants own projects.

Lecturers
Associate Professor Esben Lindgaard (elo@m-tech.aau.dk)
Associate Professor Jens Henrik Andreasen (jha@m-tech.aau.dk)
Assistant Professor Brian Bak (brianbak@m-tech.aau.dk)

Invited lecturers from national and international research institutions:
Professor Bent F. Sørensen (bsqr@dtu.dk), DTU Wind Energy, Technical University of Denmark
Professor Henrik Myhre Jensen (hmj@ase.au.dk), Department of Engineering, Aarhus University
Associate Professor Albert Turon Travesa (albert.turon@udg.edu) , Department of Mechanical Engineering and Industrial Construction, University of Girona, Spain

Invited lecturers from wind turbine industry:
Chief Engineer, PhD, Casper Kildegaard, LM Wind Power, www.lmwindpower.com

Course Language
The course will be given in English.

Teaching Material
Extensive course notes will be handed out to the participants.  

Course Format and Work Load
The course will consist of a condensed session comprised of 5 full days of lectures, work on assignments, laboratory exercises, and discussions at AAU. After the course session the course participants (PhD students) are expected to solve and submit homework assignments. Diplomas will be issued on the basis of course participation and evaluation of homework assignments, and entitle Ph.D. students to 5 ECTS, corresponding to 125-150 hours of work load.

Prerequisites
The participants are expected to have a basic knowledge in mechanics. The course is aimed specifically at Ph.D. students, but the course is also recommended for industrial engineers and engineering scientists. University staff and final year M.Sc. students are welcome as well. University staff, M.Sc. students and participants from industry may be exempted from the homework assignments and the course evaluation/examination.

Earlier Events
This course was first held in October 2012 and then again in May 2015.

Research Internship
After the course it will be possible to have a research internship at the Department of Mechanical end Manufacturing Engineering. The number of internships is limited, and will be initiated on the basis of a separate application procedure.

Deadline for registration: 30 October 2017.
Course participation is free for national Ph.D. students and university staff. Participants from industry will be charged DKK 12,500 (DKK 2,500 pr. ECTS). International Ph.D. students and university staff get a discount of 50% and will be charged DKK 6,250.

If you are from outside Aalborg University and you wish to enroll in one of our PhD courses, you must create a profile. This is done by clicking on “create new account” and filling out the form.

For further information contact Associate Professor Esben Lindgaard, Phone (+45)
9940 7329, E-mail: elo@m-tech.aau.dk OR Associate Professor Jens Henrik
Andreasen, Phone (+45) 9940 9316, E-mail: jha@m-tech.aau.dk.

Important information concerning PhD courses 
We have over some time experienced problems with no-show for both project and general courses. It has now reached a point where we are forced to take action. Therefore, the Doctoral School has decided to introduce a no-show fee of DKK 5,000 for each course where the student does not show up. Cancellations are accepted no later than 2 weeks before start of the course. Registered illness is of course an acceptable reason for not showing up on those days. Furthermore, all courses open for registration approximately three months before start. This can hopefully also provide new students a chance to register for courses during the year. We look forward to your registrations.