Welcome to Understanding Technologies in eHealth Practices from a Techno-Anthropoligical Perspective

 

Description: Techno-Anthropology is an emerging interdisciplinary research field focusing on human - technology interactions and relations, and how these can be understood and facilitated in context. Techno-Anthropology are concerned with how technological innovation, development, and implementation can be made in an appropriate and pragmatic way in relation to understanding, among other things, work practices.

The course is divided into three sections:

  1. Ethnographic and anthropological perspectives on methodology;
  2. Ethical and sociotechnical approaches; and
  3. Users, participation and human factors.

Topics covered include: learning the craft of Techno-Anthropology; anthropological approaches in studying technology induced errors; technology and the ecology of chronic illness in everyday life; Techno-Anthropologists as agents of change; and using rapid ethnography to support the design and implementation of health information technologies, as well as many more.

 

Organizers and lecturers: Professor Christian Nøhr, email: cn@plan.aau.dk, Associate Professor Pernille Bertelsen, email: Pernille@plan.aau.dk  Associate Professor Lars Botin, email: botin@plan.aau.dk, and Associate Professor Lone Stub Pedersen, email: lonep@plan.aau.dk

ECTS: 2

Time: May 2017

Place:

Zip code:

City: Aalborg

Number of seats: 20

Deadline: 2 days before

 

Important information concerning PhD courses We have over some time experienced problems with no-show for both project and general courses. It has now reached a point where we are forced to take action. Therefore, the Doctoral School has decided to introduce a no-show fee of DKK 5,000 for each course where the student does not show up. Cancellations are accepted no later than 2 weeks before start of the course. Registered illness is of course an acceptable reason for not showing up on those days. Furthermore, all courses open for registration approximately three months before start. This can hopefully also provide new students a chance to register for courses during the year. We look forward to your registrations.

Welcome to Managing Complexity in Projects

 


Description: Content: Projects are a form of enterprise where individuals or teams engage in the planning and execution of activities in order to reach specific goals/aim. Today projects are increasingly important because organizations continually need to relate to and engage in change processes to adapt to and compete in changing conditions. Project organization has an increasingly important role in all forms of organizations both private, public, NGO etc.

Projects as a form of work practice has consequences for both the work itself and for the products of the work process therefore it is important for everyone engaged in planning, design, development etc. to understand what projects are and how the project organization and process influences the product of a project.

Further projects today can often be characterized as complex. That is that understandings, processes and goals might be more or less uncertain and ambiguous throughout the project process and therefore resembling research processes more than standardized sequential or stage gate processes reflected in classic project management thinking. The complexities are evident both in internal and external conditions of the projects and on many levels of organization and planning. Challenges are related to for example learning, knowledge production and sharing, cooperation, power, ethical aspects etc.

Complexity in projects demands tailored understandings, techniques and processes for understanding and handling them. Understanding and handling the conditions/contexts of complex projects, therefore, is one of the key competences both for project managers but also for anyone participating in complex projects.

In understanding and handling complex projects new perspectives and forms of interaction are needed. The new perspectives for understanding complexity are e.g. sense making and socio-material approaches. New forms of interaction are e.g. Agile project management methods and participatory approaches.

In this course we look practically and theoretically on project planning and management. You will be introduced to different approaches of project management and planning.

The program will cover the following themes:

  • New Theoretical pererspectives of understanding and handling complexity (sense-making sociomaterial and practice perspective
  • Projects is seen as a journey characterised by uncertainty, ambiguity and complexity
  • Projects as heterogeneous processes of interaction involving actors, artefacts and knowledge
  • Understanding of different types of projects and the implication for management and planning activities
  • Identifying, stakeholders in socio-material perspective
  • Networking and brokering in and between projects
  • Knowledge and learning
  • Power and sense-making in projects
  • Challenges in managing complex projects
  • The role of learning and knowledge
  • Introduction to participatory perspectives on managing uncertainty, ambiguity and complexity

Form: The students should be familiar with basic understandings of planning, organizational change, technology construction and development and/or science and technology studies (the STS field) on an academic master level.

The program includes teacher presentations, student presentations, company talks, workshops and dialogue sessions. The workshops and dialogue sessions is set up in order to stimulate the active engagement of the students and will be used as spaces where 1)students will receive feedback on their presentations and projects from fellow students as well as teachers and “) spaces where the students are engaged in interactive games where they develop their skills to use participatory methods and tools in practice

As a preparation for the first assembly, participants should prepare a presentation of a problem/solution from their research, which they want to analyse from a complex project perspective. The presentation can focus on a case and/or a challenging perspective (oral supported with ppt) within the theme of the course.

Between the first and second assembly participants write a 5-10 pages analysis bringing theory to bear on selected case material of their own choice. These assignments are basis for evaluation and approval of participation.

In addition, participants will be asked to contribute to the activities through small task in order to stimulate the interactive learning processes

Preliminary programme for May 4-5, 2017

Location: Aalborg University, 9000 Aalborg.

Teachers: Associate Professor Søren Kerndrup, Associate Professor Lone Stub Petersen, Professor Lars Bo Henriksen + ??

Thursday, May 4, 9.00-19.00

09.00: Registration, Coffee

09.30: Welcome and introduction to the course

Perspectives on project management approaches, Søren Kerndrup

Introduction to participants, teachers and program

10.15: Projects and complexity – What is the problem? Lone Stub Petersen & Søren Kerndrup                        

Dialogue and discussion

12.00: Lunch

13.00: Managing of Complex projects in practice , Project management in practices of planning. (NN).

Dialogue and discussion

15.00: Participant presentation of their PhD or other projects and prepared assignment (approx. 10 min presentation + 10 min. discussion).

Coffee break

16.45: Workshop: Challenges in managing complex projects.

Including sandwiches.

18.00: Summing Up: What are the key lessons seen from a complexityperspective: How are the complexities conceptualised and used? Lone Stub Petersen & Søren Kerndrup.

19.00: Social Event ?

 

Friday May 5, 9.00-16.00

09.00: Management of projects and agility and lean (NN)                        

Dialogue and discussion

10.45: Participant presentation of PhD or other project and prepared assignment (approx. 10 min presentation + 10 min. discussion).

12.15: Lunch

13.00: Three perspective on managing of projects

- Project management in a socio-material perspective Lone Stub Petersen

- Managing of projects in a sensemaking and practice  perspective, Søren Kerndrup

Coffee break

15.00: Workshop, Lone Stub Petersen, Søren Kerndrup.

16.00: Summing Up: What are the key challenges of managing complex projects and how do we understand them? Lone Stub Petersen og Søren Kerndrup.

Assignments to be prepared for next assembly

16.45: Closing and networking

 

Preliminary programme for August 23-25

Location: Aalborg University, Nybrogade 6 – lokale 1.133, 9000 Aalborg.

Teachers: Associate Professor Lone Stub Petersen, Associate Professor Søren Kerndrup, Professor Lars Bo Henriksen + ??

Wednesday August 23, 9.00-17.00

09.30: Welcome to the second assembly, coffee

Introduction to teachers and program

10.00: Stakeholder & materialities

Dialogue and discussion

11.30:  Presentation of assignments

12.30: Lunch

13.30: Worldviews and narratives in project managent, Lars Bo Henriksen.

Dialogue and discussion

15.00´: Presentation of assignments

Comments from participants and teachers

17.00: End of day programme          

 

Thursday 24 August, 9.00-17.00

9.00     Complexity and power – sense making and action net in complex projects,

Christian Clausen

Dialogue and discussion

10.30: Presentation of assignments

Comments from participants and teachers

12.30: Lunch

13.30: Engagement and empowerment of actors, Lone Stub Petersen

Dialogue and discussion                      

15.00: Presentation of assignments

Comments from participants and teachers

17.00: End of day program

19.00: Social event?

 

Friday August 25., 9.00-15.00

9.00: Design of spaces and games in practice, NN & Lone Stub Petersen

Dialogue and discussion.

10.30: Presentation of assignments.

Comments from participants and teachers

12.00: Lunch

13.00: What are the key lessons? How are complex projects managed?

14.00: Wrapping up.

15.00: End of course.

Key texts and literature.                                          

Management of projects – ambiguities in complex projects

Neil Alderman and Chris Ivory (2016) Dealing with Ambiguity in Complex Projects: Planned or Emergent Practices? In Alfons Van Marrewijk (Ed.) Inside Megaprojects Understanding Cultural Practices in Project Management CBS Press p. 175-209

Bent Flyvbjerg, 2014, "What You Should Know about Megaprojects and Why: An Overview," Project Management Journal, vol. 45, no. 2, April-May, pp. 6-19

Management of Projects Agility and lean.

Scheller et al (2015): Fast or smart? How to the use of scrum can influence the temporal Enviroment. In Pries-Heie, Jan Project Management: Theory Meets Practice. Roskilde Universitetsforlag 2015 p. 39-59.

Beyer, H. (2010). User-centered aile methods. San Rafael, Calif. Morgan & Claypool Publishers. Available also in Kindle form.

The agile manifesto. Retrieved from http://www.agilemanifesto.org

Mangement of projects – Theoretical perspectives:

Söderlund, Jonas (2012): Theoretical Foundation of Project management: Suggestion for a Pluralistic understanding. Chapter 2 in Morris et al. The Oxford Handbook of Projects Management. Oxford University Press s.36-63

Robert Chia( 2013): Paradigms and Perspectives in Organizational Project Management Research: Implications for Knowledge-Creation. In Nathalie Drouin, Ralf Müller, Shankar Sankaran In Novel Approaches to Organizational Project Management Research (E-book). Translational and Transformational. CBS Press p 33-55

Svejvig, Per; Grex, Sara (2016):The Danish Agenda for Rethinking Project Management.

In International Journal of Managing Projects in Business, Vol. 9, Nr. 4, 2016, s. 822-844.

Management of projects – New Theoretical perspectives

Sage, D et al: How Actor-network theories can help understanding project complexities. International Journal of Managing Projects in Business Vol. 4 No. 2, 2011 pp. 274-293

Michael Er, Julien Pollack and Shankar Sankaran (2013): Actor-Network Theory, Activity Theory and Action Research and their Application in Project Management Research. Nathalie Drouin, Ralf Müller, Shankar Sankaran In Novel Approaches to Organizational Project Management Research (E-book). Translational and Transformational. CBS Press p. 165-198

Alderman, N. and Ivory, C. 2011. Translation and convergence in projects: an organisational perspective on project success, Project Management Journal, 42(5): 17-30

Ivory CJ, Alderman N, McLoughlin IP, Vaughan R. Sense making as a process within complex projects. In: Hodgson, D., Svetlana, C, ed. Making Projects Critical. London: Palgrave, 2006, pp.316-334

Hallgren M & Söderholm, A. (2012): Project as practice: A new approach. Chapter 21 in Morris et al. The oxford Handbook of Projects Management. Oxford University Press

Kreiner, Kristian (1995): In search of relevance: Project management in drifting enviroments. Scandinavian Journal of management 11, no 4, s 335-346.

Hällgren, Markus, et al. "Relevance lost! A critical review of project management standardisation." International Journal of Managing Projects in Business 5.3 (2012): 457-485

Managing of projects as story and Narratives.

Henriksen, Lars Bo (2012): The Engineering Project as Story and Narrative. In / Dariusz Jemielniak;ed.

Managing Dynamic Technology-Oriented Business: High Tech Organizations and Workplaces. Abigail Marks. IGI global, 2012. s. 159-170.

Henriksen, Lars Bo Knowledge Work and the Problem of Implementation : The Case of Engineering.  In Dariusz Jemielniak ed. The Laws of the Knowledge Workplace: Changing Roles and the Meaning of Work in Knowledge-Intensive Environments . Gower Publishing Ltd, 2014. s. 35-53.

Management of projects: Knowledge. Learning and Power.

Lindkvist (2012): Knowledge Integration in Product Development Projects: The Contingency Framework. Chapter 19 in Morris et al. The oxford Handbook of Projects Management. Oxford University Press
*Edmondson, Amy C. "Wicked Problem Solvers: Lessons from Successful Cross-industry Teams." Harvard Business Review 94, no. 6 (June 2016): 53–59

Management of Projects: Stakeholder, heteorogenity and relations.

Graham Winch Megaproject Stakeholder Management in Flyvbjerg, B. ed.The Oxford Handbook of megaprojects. Oxford university press 2017

Clegg, Steward et al.: Power and sensemaking i mega projects. https://www.researchgate.net/publication/293047849_Power_and_sensemaking_in_megaprojects

Eskerod, P., Huemann, M., & Savage, G. (2015). Project Stakeholder Management - Past and Present, Project Management Journal, 46(6): 6-14.

Stephanie Missonier & Sabrina Loufrani-Fedida (2015):Stakeholder analysis and engagement in projects: From stakeholder relational perspective to stakeholder relational ontology  International Journal of Project Management 32 (2014) 1108–1122

Tryggestad, Kjell; Justesen, Lise; Mouritsen, Jan / Project Temporalities : How Frogs Can Become Stakeholders. International Journal of Managing Projects in Business, Vol. 6, Nr. 1, 2013

Organizers: Associate Professor Lone Stub Petersen, email: lonep@mail.aau.dk and Associate Professor Søren Kerndrup, email: soeren@plan.aau.dk

Lecturers: Associate Professor Lone Stub Petersen, Associate Professor Søren Kerndrup, Professor Lars Bo Henriksen, Professor Christian Clausen and two external introductory speakers

ECTS: 5

Time: 4. - 5. May and 23. - 25. August 2017

Place: Aalborg University

Zip code: 9000

City: Aalborg

Number of seats: 20

Deadline: 6. April 2017

 

Important information concerning PhD courses We have over some time experienced problems with no-show for both project and general courses. It has now reached a point where we are forced to take action. Therefore, the Doctoral School has decided to introduce a no-show fee of DKK 5,000 for each course where the student does not show up. Cancellations are accepted no later than 2 weeks before start of the course. Registered illness is of course an acceptable reason for not showing up on those days. Furthermore, all courses open for registration approximately three months before start. This can hopefully also provide new students a chance to register for courses during the year. We look forward to your registrations.

Welcome to Theories of Sustainable Transitions

 

Description: This PhD course is intended for students conducting research related to analysis, design and innovation processes for the needed transformations to achieve sustainability goals. The teachers of the course will offer advanced discussion in theories of transitions and will illustrate their theoretical work through case studies conducted in various places including Holland, Denmark, the United Kingdom, Brazil and Argentina. These case studies range from local community based initiatives, to city projects to country and regional programs for sustainability. International collaboration efforts will also be discussed. 

Objectives

At the end of this course the students would be able to:

  1. Explain how their own project and ideas relate to state of the art discussions in transitions theories (MLP; TIS; AOD; Practice Theory)
  2. Explain the principal issues involved in innovations for sustainable transitions.
  3. Describe the main challenges and efforts to sustainable transitions in various countries.
  4. Describe the main challenges and efforts to sustainable transitions in urban settings analysing examples from Europe.
  5. Describe the main governance challenges and advancements in relation to governance theories to achieve sustainable transitions. 

Students should:

  1. Enrol in the course by 31 March 2017 at https://phd.moodle.aau.dk/login/
  2. Deliver a one-page description of their project by 1 of April 2017. Please be clear about what are the questions of your research project and in what ways you imagine that the transitions theories might be supportive.
  3. Deliver by the 1st of May 2017 a three-page analysis of how their project relates to the course. In what ways does the literature help the project? In what ways does the project serves as a basis to criticize the literature?
  4. Make a presentation during the course in order to get feedback from the teachers. The aim of the presentation is that students test their ideas of how the theories of transitions might be supportive of their project. (This is optional but strongly recommended)
  5. Deliver by the 30th of July 2017 a 10 page paper with the full elaboration of their ideas. Ideally this exercise should support the students’ progress in their PhD either by advancing her state of the art review, a chapter, an article or any kind of structured idea.

In short:

  • Deadline for enrolment: 31 March 2017
  • Deadline for project paper: 1 of April 2017
  • Preparatory reading and writing: 1 April – 1 May 2017
  • Deadline for preliminary analysis: 1 May 2017 Meetings: 17-19 May (3 full days)
  • Delivery of a 10 page paper: 30 July 2017

Readings: This reading list is recommended. Students are free to  replace these readings with others they might consider more pertinent. The objective however is that students should mature their theoretical take on their project through the course.

  • Jørgensen, U. (2012). Mapping and navigating transitions—The multi-level perspective compared with arenas of development. Research Policy.
  • MARKARD, J. & TRUFFER, B. 2008. Technological innovation systems and the multi-level perspective: Towards an integrated framework. Research Policy,  37, 596-615.
  • GEELS, F. W., HEKKERT, M. P. & JACOBSSON, S. 2008. The dynamics of sustainable innovation journeys. Technology Analysis & Strategic Management, 20, 521-536.
  • Smith, A. (2007) Translating sustainabilities between green niches and socio-technical regimes, Technology Analysis & Strategic Management, 19, 4: 427-450
  • Marin, A. and M. Vila Seoane (2013). “A path breaking niche: The Cooperative COOPSOL Ltda.”.
  • Smith, A. and R. Raven (2012) What is protective space?  Reconsidering niches in transitions to sustainability, Research Policy 41: 1025-1036.
  • Smith, A., Kern, F, Raven, R. and B. Verhees (2013 – in press) Spaces for sustainable innovation: solar photovoltaic electricity in the UK, Technological Forecasting & Social Change
  • Smith, A., Fressoli, M. and H. Thomas (2012 – accepted) Grassroots innovation movements: challenges and contributions, Journal of Cleaner Production
  • Marin, A. (2012): Putting natural resources industries to work forsustainable development in Latin America. Poverty in Focus, Nro 24, International Policy Centre for Inclusive Growth, p:  35-37.
  • Marin, A.,L. Stubrin and P. Van Zwanenberg   (2013). “Developing capabilities in the seed industry:  which direction to follow?
  • Galvão, A., Juruá, M. and L. Esteves (2012). “The Amazons and the Use of its Biodiversity”. Report for the IDRC funded project “Opening up Natural Resource-Based  Industries  for  Innovation:  Exploring  New  Pathways for Development in Latin America”.
  • Bulkeley, Harriet, and Michele Betsill. "Rethinking sustainable cities: multilevel governance and the 'urban'politics of climate change." Environmental Politics 14.1 (2005): 42-63.
  • Murphy, J and A Smith (2013 – in press) Understanding transition-periphery dynamics: renewable energy in the Highlands and Islands of Scotland, Environment and Planning A
  • Lissandrello, E. and Grin, J. (2011) Reflexive Planning as Design and Work: Lessons from the Port of Amsterdam. Planning Theory and Practice
  • Voβ, J-P., Smith, A. And J. Grin (2009) Designing long-term policy: re- thinking transition management Policy Sciences 42, 4: 275-302
  • Smith, A. and A.Stirling (2010) The politics of social-ecological resilience and sustainable socio-technical transitions Ecology & Society 15, 1: online http://www.ecologyandsociety.org/vol15/iss1/art11/
  • Smith, A. and F. Kern (2009) The transitions storyline in Dutch environmental policy Environmental Politics, 18, 1: 78-98
  • Lissandrello, E. and Sterrenberg, L. (forthcoming) Transitions in Dutch Politics of Planning

Organizer: Postdoc Andres Felipe Valderrama Pineda, email: afvp@plan.aau.dk and Professor Ulrik Jørgensen, email: uljo@plan.aau.dk

Lecturers: Professor Rob Raven (University of Utrecht); Postdoc Andres Felipe Valderrama Pineda, Professor Ulrik Jørgensen, Professor MSO Inge Pøpke and Assistant Professor Jens Stissing Jensen

ECTS: 5

Time: 17 - 19 May 2017

Place: Aalborg University, Copenhagen,  AC Meyers Vænge 15, room 2.1.042

Zip code: 2450

City: Copenhagen

Number of seats: 15

Deadline: 31 March 2017

 

Important information concerning PhD courses We have over some time experienced problems with no-show for both project and general courses. It has now reached a point where we are forced to take action. Therefore, the Doctoral School has decided to introduce a no-show fee of DKK 5,000 for each course where the student does not show up. Cancellations are accepted no later than 2 weeks before start of the course. Registered illness is of course an acceptable reason for not showing up on those days. Furthermore, all courses open for registration approximately three months before start. This can hopefully also provide new students a chance to register for courses during the year. We look forward to your registrations.

Welcome to Innovative Processes and their Staging

 

Description: Content:

While innovation is increasingly depending on the incorporation of knowledge from a diversity of sources, questions are raised as to what kinds of sources, and how they are incorporated in processes of innovation. As innovative challenges and conditions are changing with increasing pace these questions cannot just be solved through a singular choice of organisation or established guidelines for selecting innovative ideas. Issues of how to stage the scene and circumstances and how to facilitate processes and the involvement of diverse actors in innovation have increasingly come into focus. Successful innovation is seen as the outcome of interactions within a broader network spanning across diverse organisational and societal boundaries and institutions. There is a need to address the creation and navigation of new for a and spaces for development where existing frames of understandings may be challenged and new patterns for interactions emerge.

The course takes its departure in the well-described dilemmas between incremental but often path dependent innovative processes within established networks and the quest for the development of new innovative, disruptive or breakthrough ideas, product and services facilitated through new networked relations. A range of theories, cases and approaches concerned with the framing, organising and staging of innovative processes, from linear sequential models to complex, dynamic networks of innovation are treated and related to the current work of the participants.

During the course, a dialogue is created between the participants’ projects and a diversity of understandings of the management and staging of innovation from organisation, institutional theory and sociology of innovation. The idea is to direct inquiry and to stimulate theoretical insights and empirical approaches in the field of innovation. The course introduces concepts, which help render relevant phenomena and issues (relationships, dynamics, consequences) in the participants’ projects visible and open to investigation and analysis. This would, in turn, also help in delineating hypotheses of relevance to the investigation of innovative processes and their staging, and in proposing new directions for research in the field.

The program will cover the following themes:

  • Challenges in innovation management and the staging of innovative processes
  • Innovation as heterogeneous processes of interaction involving actors, artefacts and knowledge
  • Innovation as a journey characterized by uncertainty, ambiguity and complexity
  • Innovation between rational analytical and interpretive processes, exploitation and exploration
  • Innovation as networking, brokering and collaboration in and between organizations
  • From planning and calculation to social learning and translation of interests
  • ‘Co-creation’ and ‘path creation’ as heterogeneous network building,
  • Staging and navigation of temporary spaces for innovation across knowledge boundaries

Form

The students should be familiar with basic understandings of innovative processes from innovation process theory and/or science and technology studies (the STS field) on an academic master level.

The program includes teacher presentations, student presentations, company talks and dialogue sessions where students will receive feedback on their presentations and projects from fellow students as well as teachers.

As a preparation for the first assembly, participants should prepare a presentation of a problem/solution from their research, which they want to analyse from an innovation process perspective. The presentation can focus on a case and/or a challenging perspective (oral supported with ppt) within the theme of the course (It is important to describe how innovation processes could be a relevant perspective for your activities in order to provide a professional and empirical background for your own reflexive learning.)

Between the first and second assembly participants write a 5-10 pages analysis bringing theory to bear on selected case material of their own choice. These assignments are basis for evaluation and approval of participation. In addition participants will be asked to fill in a formal evaluation scheme.

Programme for 29-30 May, 2017

Location: Aalborg University, 9000 Aalborg.

Teachers: associate professor Søren Kerndrup, AAU, SIP; professor Christian Clausen, AAU, DIST. Business Development Manager Ole Tangsgaard, Condair A/S and Research AssistentPeter Thomsen, BMDC, AAU.

Monday May 29, 9.00-19.00

09.00: Registration, Coffee

09.30: Welcome and introduction to the course Perspectives on innovation processes and their staging, Christian Clausen

Introduction to participants, teachers and program

10.15: Presentation of course idea and theme: Innovation a process perspective: What characterizes processes and how are processes understood and used in innovation? Christian Clausen & Søren Kerndrup                

11.00: Innovation methodology and tools from an intra-firm perspective. Innovative practices in companies. Ole Tangsgaard, Condair A/S.

Dialogue and discussion

12.00: Lunch

13.00: Current challenges in innovation management. Experiences from companies, Ole Tangsgaard, Condair A/S.

Dialogue and discussion

14.30: Innovation, users and interactive spaces, Christian Clausen.

Coffee break

Dialogue and discussion

16.30: Participant presentation of their PhD or other projects and prepared assignment (approx. 10 min presentation + 10 min. discussion).

Including sandwiches.

18.00: Summing Up: What are the key lessons seen from a process perspective: How are processes conceptualised and used? Christian Clausen & Søren Kerndrup.

19.00: Going out together?

Tuesday 30 May, 9.00-16.00

09.00: Business model Innovation Peter Thomsen, Business Model Design center, Aalborg University

Dialogue and discussion

Coffee break

11.00: Innovation as learning and sensemaking across boundaries in organizations, Søren Kerndrup.

12.15: Lunch

13.00: Innovation as networking and brokering between organisations, networks and communities Søren Kerndrup.

Coffee break

14.30: Participant presentation of PhD or other project and prepared assignment (approx. 10 min presentation + 10 min. discussion).

15.30: Summing Up: What are the key lessons seen from a process perspective: How is the processes conceptualised and used? Søren Kerndrup.

Dialogue and discussion

16.00: Assignments to be prepared for next assembly

16.30: Closing and networking

Preliminary programme for 25-27 September

Location: Aalborg University Copenhagen, 2450 Copenhagen SV.

Teachers: Professor Peter Karnøe, AAU, DIST; associate professor Søren Kerndrup, AAU, DIST; associate professor Hanne Lindegaard and professor Christian Clausen, AAU, DIST.

Monday 25 September, 9.00-17.00

09.30: Welcome to the second assembly at AAU CPH, coffee

Introduction to teachers and program

10.30: Political and learning perspectives on innovation processes, Christian Clausen

Dialogue and discussion

12.00: Lunch

13.00: Presentation of assignments

Comments from participants and teachers

14.00: Practice perspectives on innovative processes, Søren Kerndrup

Dialogue and discussion

15.30: Presentation of assignments

Comments from participants and teachers

17.00: End of day programme                          

Tuesday 26 September, 9.00-17.00

9.00: Actor Network Perspectives on innovation: Path dependencies and path creation, Peter Karnøe

Dialogue and discussion

10.30: Presentation of assignments

Comments from participants and teachers

12.30: Lunch

13.30: Creation of meaning in innovation processes a design perspective, Hanne Lindegaard.

Dialogue and discussion

15.00: Presentation of assignments

Comments from participants and teachers

17.00: End of day program

19.00: Going out to eat together?

Wednesday 27 September, 9.00-15.00

9.00: Staging innovative processes: Arenas, spaces and artefacts. Christian Clausen

Dialogue and discussion.

10.30: Presentation of assignments.

Comments from participants and teachers

12.00: Lunch

13.00: What are the key lessons seen from a process perspective: How are processes conceptualised and used?

14.00: Wrapping up.

15.00: End of course.

Key texts (*) related to the lectures part 1, 30-31 maj  

INTRODUCTION LECTURER:

- Innovation a process perspective: What characterizes processes and how are processes understood and used in innovation?   

  • *Garud, R.; Tuertscher, P. & Van de Ven, A.H. (2013) Perspectives on Innovation Processes, The Academy of Management Annals, pp. 773-817, DOI:10.1080/19416520.2013.791066
  • *Van de Ven, M.; Polley, D.E.; Garud, R. and Venkataraman, S. (1999) Mapping the Innovation Journey, In de Ven, Polley, Garud and Venkataraman: The Innovation Journey, New York: Oxford University Press, pp. 21-66.
  • Akrich, M. & Callon, M. and Latour, B. (2002) ‘The Key to Success in Innovation Part I: The Art of Interessement’, International Journal of Innovation Management, Vol 6, 2:187-206.
  • Akrich, M. & Callon, M. and Latour, B. (2002) ‘The Key to Success in Innovation Part II: The Art of Choosing Good Spokespersons’, International Journal of Innovation Management, Vol 6, 2:207-225

LECTURER ON INNOVATION PRACTICE IN INDUSTRY – GRUNDFOSS & CONAIR.

- Innovation methodology and tools in practice  & current challenges in innovation management. Experiences from companies,

  • *O’Connor, G & Rice, Mark P (2013) A Comprehensive Model of Uncertainty Associated with Radical Innovation. Journal of Product Innovation Management, Vol 30, issues supplement 51, p 2-18
  • *Cooper, RG (2009): The Stage Gate Idea to Launch System. Chapter four in Cooper: Winning at New Products. Basic Books, pp. 83-106
  • Leifer et al (2000) The Course of Radical Innovation. Chapter two in Leifer et al. Radical innovation. Harvard Business School Press.
  • Kristiansen, J. & Gertsen, F (2016): Is radical innovation management misunderstood? problematising the radical innovation discipline. International Journal of Innovation Management, Volume 19, Issue 6, 1 December 2015,

LECTURER ON USERINNOVATION AND INTERACTIVE SPACES.

- creating interactive spaces,

  • *Gunn, Wendy & Clausen, Christian (2014): Conceptions of Innovation and Practice: Designing indoor Climate. Chapter 9 in Gunn, Wendy et al: Design Anthropology: Theory and Practice. Bloomsbury Academic. pp 159-179.

LECTURER ON BUSINESS MODEL INNOVATION

- Key concepts and Experiences from organizations.

  • *Taran, Y., Boer, H. and Lindgren, P. (2015), “A business model innovation typology”, Decision Sciences, Vol. 46 No. 2, pp. 301-31.
  • *Osterwalder, Alexander & Yves Pigneur: Business model Generation (Preview)

http://www.businessmodelgeneration.com/downloads/businessmodelgeneration_preview.pdf

  • *Taran, Y., Boer, H. and Lindgren, P. (2015), “A business model innovation typology”, Decision Sciences, Vol. 46 No. 2, pp. 301-31.
  • Chesbrough, H. (2010), “Business model innovation: Opportunities and barriers”, Long Range Planning, Vol. 43 No. 2-3, pp. 354-63.
  • McGrath, R.G. (2010), “Business models: A discovery driven approach”, Long Range Planning, Vol. 43 No. 2, pp. 247-61

LECTURER ON INNOVATION CROSS BOUNDARIES IN FIRMS.

- Innovation, knowledge and sensemaking across boundaries.

  • *Dougherty, D (1992): Interpretive Barriers to successful Product Innovation in Large Firms. Organization Science, vol 3, no (May 1992) pp 173-202.
  • *Carlile, P. (2002) A Pragmatic View of Knowledge and Boundaries: Boundary objects in new product development. Organization Science 13 (4), p. 442-456.
  • * Roberto Verganti & Åsa Öberg (2012): Interpreting and envisioning — A hermeneutic framework to look at radical innovation of meanings. Industrial Marketing Management 42 (2013) 86–95

LECTURER ON INNOVATION ACROSS FIRMS, ORGANIZATION AND INSTITUTIONS.

- Innovation as networking and brokering between organisations, networks and communities.

  • *Hargadon, A.B. (2013) Brokerage and innovation. In Dodgson et al:  The Oxford handbook of Innovation management. Oxford University Press.
  • *Hargadon & Douglas (2001) When innovations meet institutions: Edison and the design of the electric Light. Administrative Science Quarterly. Vol 46, pp 476-501

Recommanded reading for newcommers to the field:

If the innovation Field is new to you or if you have limited knowledge of the field you can start with these introductory texts:

  • Conway, S. & Steward, F. (2009) Introduction – Key Themes, Concepts, and definitions in study of innovations, Chapter 1, In Conway, Steve and Steward, Fred: Managing and Shaping Innovation, Oxford 2009, pp. 6-31.
  • Conway, Steve & Steward, Fred (2009) Tensions, Paradox and Contradictions in Managing Innovation, Chapter 2, In Conway, Steve and Steward, Fred: Managing and Shaping Innovation, Oxford 2009, pp. 39-62.

Litterature for further reading, part 1:

Innovation: The process perspective

  • Pavitt, K. (2005) ‘Innovation processes’, In Fagerberg, Mowery and Nelson (eds.) The Oxford Handbook of Innovation, Oxford: Oxford University Press, pp. 86-114.
  • Hoholm, T. & Olsen, I. (2012) The Contrary Forces of Innovation: A Conceptual Model for Studying Networked Innovation processes. Industrial Marketing Management 41 (2) 344-356.

Innovation processes: Big empirical studies.

  • Van de Ven, M.; Polley, D.E.; Garud, R. and Venkataraman, S. (1999) The Innovation Journey, New York: Oxford University Press,
  • Leifer et al (2000) Radical innovation. Harvard Business School Press.
  • Hoholm, T., The Contrary Forces of Innovation, London: Palgrave McMillan
  • Dougherty, D (2016): Taking advantage of emergence. Oxford University press 2016
  • Lester, R.K. & Piore, M.J. (2004). Innovation. The missing Dimension. Harvard University Press

Innovation process: Uncertainty, ambiguity and learning.

  • Dunne., D.D. & Dougherty, D (2016):Abductive Reasoning: How Innovators Navigate in the Labyrinth of Complex Product Innovation, Organization studies 2016, Vol. 37(2) 131–159
  • Sætre, Alf Steiner & Brun , Eric (2012) Strategic Management of Innovation: Managing Exploration-exploitation by Balancing Creativity and Constraint. International Journal of Innovation and Technology Management. Vol 9, No 6 (24 pages)
  • Garud, R & Van de Ven, A (1992): An empirical evaluation of internal Corporate venturing process. Strategic management Journal, Vol 13, 93-109.
  • Andrew H. Van de Ven and Douglas Polley (1992): Learning While Innovating. Organization Science, Vol. 3, No. 1 (Feb., 1992), pp. 92-116

Innovation process: Case studies:

  • Van de Ven, A.H. et al (1999) The Innovation Journey Within an International Corporate Structure: The 3 M Cochlar Implant Case. Published in Mapping the Innovation Journey, In de Ven, Polley, Garud and Venkataraman: The Innovation Journey, New York: Oxford University Press, pp. 223-289
  • Garud, R, Gehman, J & Kumaraswamy, A (2011) Complexity Arrangement for Sustained Innovation: Lessons from 3 M Corporation. Organization Studies, Vol 32, pp 737-767
  • Dougherty, D & Dunne, D.D. (2011): Organizing ecologies of complex innovation. Organization Science 23(5): 1467-1484

Innovation, networking, brokering and collaboration

  • Hargadon, A.B. (2002) Brokering Knowledge: Linking Learning and Innovation, Research in Organizational Behaviour 24, pp. 41-85.
  • Kastelle, Tim & Steen. John (2013): Networks of Innovation. In Dodgson et al:  The Oxford handbook of Innovation management. Oxford University Press.  pp.102-120
  • Birkinshaw, J., Bessant, J. and Delbridge, R. (2007) Finding, Forming, and Performing:  Creating Networks for Discontinuous Innovation." California Management Review 49, 3:67-83.
  • Dodgson, Mark (2013): Collaboration and Innovation Management. In Dodgson et al:  The Oxford handbook of Innovation management. Oxford University Press. pp.462-481

Exploring different innovation controversies: incremental vs. radical, disruptive and discontinuous vs, continous innovation, exploration vs exploitation, close vs. open innovation

  • Rothwell, R. (1994) Towards the Fifth-generation Innovation Process, International Marketing Review, 11, 1: 7-31.
  • Norman & Verganti (2012) Incremental and radical innovation: Design Research versus Technology and Meaning. Design Issues, submitted paper 2012
  • Christensen, Clayton M., Michael Raynor, and Rory McDonald. "What Is Disruptive Innovation?" Harvard Business Review 93, no. 12 (December 2015): 44–53.
  • Gans, Joshua (2016): The disruption Dilemma. MIT Press Cambrigde Massachusetts.
  • Benner, M. J. and Tushman, M.L. (2003) Exploitation, exploration, and process management: The productivity dilemma revisited, The Academy of Management Review 28, 2:238.
  • Gassmann, O. & Enkel, E. (2006) Towards a Theory of Open Innovation: Three Core Process Archetypes. R&D Management Conference. St. Gallen: University of St. Gallen.
  • Christiansen, John K. & Varnes, Claus J (2009) Formal Rules in Product Development: Sensemaking of structured Approaches. Journal of Product Innovation Management, vol 26, pp 502-519

 

 

Organizer: Associate Professor Søren Kerndrup, email: soeren@plan.aau.dk and Professor Christian Clausen, email: chcl@plan.aau.dk

Lecturers: Associate Professor Søren Kerndrup; Professor Christian Clausen; Business Development Manager Ole Tangsgaard, Condair A/S; Associate Professor Astrid Heidemann Lassen; Professor Peter Karnøe, and Associate Professor Hanne Lindegaard

ECTS: 5

Time: 29 - 30 May and 25 - 27 September 2017

Place: Aalborg University in Aalborg (May) and Aalborg University in Copenhagen (September)

Zip code: 9000 (Aalborg), 2450 (Copenhagen SV)

City: Aalborg and Copenhagen

Number of seats: 20

Deadline: 11 September 2017

 

Important information concerning PhD courses We have over some time experienced problems with no-show for both project and general courses. It has now reached a point where we are forced to take action. Therefore, the Doctoral School has decided to introduce a no-show fee of DKK 5,000 for each course where the student does not show up. Cancellations are accepted no later than 2 weeks before start of the course. Registered illness is of course an acceptable reason for not showing up on those days. Furthermore, all courses open for registration approximately three months before start. This can hopefully also provide new students a chance to register for courses during the year. We look forward to your registrations.

 

Welcome to Advanced LCA – Consequential Modeling, EIO-LCA, iLUC and Social LCA

 

Organizers

The course is organized by the Doctoral School of Engineering And Science, Aalborg University and Danish Centre for Environmental Assessment (DCEA) www.DCEA.dk, in collaboration with the International Life Cycle Academy (ILCA) www.ILCA.es

 

Description

The course aims at strengthening skills in life cycle inventory analysis. The course introduces to advanced inventory modelling using the techniques of consequential LCA and input-output (IO) LCA. The students will apply algorithms for performing consequential LCA in the definition of functional unit, consumption mix, and identification of determining and dependent co-products. The course will bring the above mentioned theories further into practice on two specific cases: modelling of indirect Land Use Changes (iLUC) and socio-economic impacts. The course targets the development of advanced competences in LCA by applying the problem based-learning (PBL) teaching method. Following the PBL model that focuses on learning by doing and reflection, the course activities will include intensive group work, problem defining and solving applied to real-word cases, practical exercises, and discussion sessions or workshops. The course is organized in five consecutive days of full-time activities (09:00-16:00). When including readings and group work assignments, the total course workload corresponds to 5 ECTS (1 ETCS = 25 hours of work for the student). Optionally, participants can choose to write a paper based on their PhD project and combining the know-how developed during the course, that will be reviewed by the course lecturers. The submission of the paper will have deadline approximately 10 weeks after the last day of the course. Choosing this option will correspond to obtaining additional 3 ECTS.

Preliminary program

Day 1-2: Consequential modelling in life cycle inventory

Day 3: Input-output modelling

Day 4-5: Modelling of indirect land use changes and new perspectives in Life cycle impact assessment

Lecturers

Bo Weidema, Professor

Jannick Schmidt, Associate Professor

Søren Løkke, Associate professor

Massimo Pizzol, Associate professor

Registration and info: Student can register by contacting the course organizer Massimo Pizzol, email: massimo@plan.aau.dk

ECTS Distribution: The 5 ECTS credits of the course are divided approximately in this way:

Activity

Hours

ECTS

Lectures   and group work in class

40

1,6

Readings

40

1,6

Group   work prior to course

20

0,8

Group   work after course

25

1

Total

125

5

Activities: Includes attending to the lectures and performing exercises in class.

Readings: Approx. 100 pages of scientific articles and reports, that are provided to the students.

Group work: students work in groups (max 5 people). Each group will work on a case study and apply the knowledge of the course on the case study.

EXAMPLE, a group works on an LCA of a product and does:

  • prior to the course: choice of product and data mining, getting base knowledge and data to describe the product system.
  • during the course (exercises in class): consequential inventory with matrix format, IO LCA inventory, inclusion of iLUC, inclusion of social impacts. Etc. etc. etc.
  • after the course: organize the material and prepare a portfolio/article where all the techniques are presented for the case study.

Eventually, all portfolios are made available on moodle. Each student will thus get the info on five different cases. Students should be able to organize themselves using online tools (skype, dropbox etc) to collaborate in group remotely prior and after the course.

Price: 

PhD students affiliated to a Danish University

Free

Free

PhD students not affiliated to a Danish University

3.000 DKK

(400 EUR)

3.750 DKK

(500 EUR)

Academics (e.g. postdoc and professors)

6.000 DKK

(800 EUR)

7.500 DKK

(1000 EUR)

Professionals (consultancy, industry, etc.)

15.000 DKK

(2000 EUR)

18.750 DKK

(2500 EUR)

* Prices do not cover meals, accommodation, and social dinner on Monday 

Organizer: Associate Professor Massimo Pizzol, email: massimo@plan.aau.dk

ECTS: 5 or 8

Time: May 29 – June 2, 2017

Place: Aalborg University, Rendsburggade 14

Zip code: 9000

City: Aalborg

Number of seats: 25

Deadline: 1 May 2017

 

Important information concerning PhD courses We have over some time experienced problems with no-show for both project and general courses. It has now reached a point where we are forced to take action. Therefore, the Doctoral School has decided to introduce a no-show fee of DKK 5,000 for each course where the student does not show up. Cancellations are accepted no later than 2 weeks before start of the course. Registered illness is of course an acceptable reason for not showing up on those days. Furthermore, all courses open for registration approximately three months before start. This can hopefully also provide new students a chance to register for courses during the year. We look forward to your registrations.

Welcome to Predicting Food Behaviour with Big Data and Small Sensors

 

Description: Learning goals

The students should know about the potentials of applying consumer as Well as business generated data in consumer, food and health studies. The students should know about latest inventions in ICT assisted devices for food studies. The students will perform a Written Group Assignment on Ethics, privacy or business aspect of data/sensor Technologies

Organizer: Professor Bent Egberg Mikkelsen, email: bemi@dcm.aau.dk

Lecturers: Bent Egberg Mikkelsen, Krijn Poppe, Marc Jeroeme Bogart and Kwabena Ofei

ECTS: ?

Time: 28. - 30. June 2017

Place: Aalborg University Copenhagen

Zip code: 2450

City: Copenhagen SV

Number of seats: 20

Deadline: 5. June 2017

Important information concerning PhD courses We have over some time experienced problems with no-show for both project and general courses. It has now reached a point where we are forced to take action. Therefore, the Doctoral School has decided to introduce a no-show fee of DKK 5,000 for each course where the student does not show up. Cancellations are accepted no later than 2 weeks before start of the course. Registered illness is of course an acceptable reason for not showing up on those days. Furthermore, all courses open for registration approximately three months before start. This can hopefully also provide new students a chance to register for courses during the year. We look forward to your registrations.

Welcome to Future Media – Techologies and Markets

 

Description: The course is concerned with the development of the audio/visual media sector from technology, market and policy perspectives.

Media landscapes have gone through major changes throughout the history and have been undergoing fundamental changes in recent years and will continue to do so in the near future. The changes have intensified in the last two decades starting with the digitalization of broadcast infrastructures and presently with the development of streaming platforms and the development of broadband infrastructures and cloud platforms that most likely will result in the end of dedicated infrastructures for media distributions. Time shifting, place shifting, video and audio on demand, and global networks for distribution of audio visual content are just a few examples of these changes. The implications are, e.g., the disruption of the traditional media distribution and delivery forms, distribution of content markets, disruption of home video markets, disruption of the record and music industry. Furthermore, there are major changes in the usage and consumption behavior connected with terminal devices and the combination of audio visual applications and services with social networking applications.

These changes are driven by the interplay between technological developments, market developments and new business models and the policy and regulatory environment. The aim of this course is to discuss the driving forces for such changes and to examine the implications for the market, industry, users and the technological development.

The course will address the following topics:

  • Convergence
  • New business models
  • Standardization processes
  • Dedicated TV and radio infrastructures - the current status and future perspectives
  • Linear and nonlinear audio-visual services
  • Over the Top (OTT) and hybrid platforms
  • Development of fixed and mobile broadband infrastructures, including LTE and 5G as platform for audio visual services
  • Market developments and usage

Organizer: Professor Anders Henten, email: henten@cmi.aau.dk and Associate Professor Reza Tadayoni, email: reza@cmi.aau.dk

Lecturers: Professor Anders Henten, Associate Professor Reza Tadayoni, Professor Knud Erik Skouby, and Postdoc Jannick Kirk Sørensen

ECTS: 3

Time: 6. - 8. September

Place: Aalborg University Copenhagen

Zip code: 2450

City: Copenhagen SV

Number of seats: 20

Deadline: 15. August 2017

Important information concerning PhD courses We have over some time experienced problems with no-show for both project and general courses. It has now reached a point where we are forced to take action. Therefore, the Doctoral School has decided to introduce a no-show fee of DKK 5,000 for each course where the student does not show up. Cancellations are accepted no later than 2 weeks before start of the course. Registered illness is of course an acceptable reason for not showing up on those days. Furthermore, all courses open for registration approximately three months before start. This can hopefully also provide new students a chance to register for courses during the year. We look forward to your registrations.

 

Welcome to Potentials and Challenges of Circular Economy as Sustainability Strategy

 

Description: It is increasingly acknowledged that the linear ‘take-make-dispose’ economic model is reaching its limits, and initiatives to develop alternative economic models are emerging. Circular economy is currently getting a lot of attention, because it promises an industrial system that is restorative by design. Both businesses and cities are developing circular economy strategies.

However, circular economy is not without shortcomings as strategy for sustainable development. It is risky promoting a circular economy, where focus merely is on closing existing material flows and not trying to understand the dynamics of the present linear economy by questioning why we produce what, the challenge to closing material flows from the globalized, outsourced cheap production, and when and why products lose value to their users and become waste.

The course introduces potentials and challenges to circular economy from a business perspective and from an urban perspective.  Theoretically the course integrates theories about product chains, value chains, social practices, user-oriented innovation and governance.

Three types of re-design processes are proposed, which are necessary to consider when developing circular economy business models within specific institutional and regulatory contexts: 1) re-designs of products and services based on considerations about necessary changes in roles of products, users, service, infrastructure, etc. 2) re-designing value chains both up-stream and down-stream and 3) internal organizational redesign of the business organization in order to integrate environmental concerns in product and strategy development.

From an urban perspective different roles in developing and supporting circular economy are introduced: 1) Public planning, 2) Public infrastructures, 3) Public procurement, 4) Public building and construction, 5) Local business development.

 

Organizer: Professor Arne Remmen, email: ar@plan.aau.dk and Associate Professor Michael Søgaard Jørgensen, email: msjo@plan.aau.dk

Lecturers: Professor Arne Remmen, Associate Professor Michael Søgaard Jørgensen, Associate Professor Erik Hagelskjær Lauridsen, and Maarten Hajer, business representative, municipal administration manager, infrastructure manager

ECTS: 5

Time: 1 - 3 November

Place: Aalborg University Copenhagen

Zip code: 2450

City: Copenhagen SV

Number of seats: 20

Deadline: 31. August 2017

 

Important information concerning PhD courses We have over some time experienced problems with no-show for both project and general courses. It has now reached a point where we are forced to take action. Therefore, the Doctoral School has decided to introduce a no-show fee of DKK 5,000 for each course where the student does not show up. Cancellations are accepted no later than 2 weeks before start of the course. Registered illness is of course an acceptable reason for not showing up on those days. Furthermore, all courses open for registration approximately three months before start. This can hopefully also provide new students a chance to register for courses during the year. We look forward to your registrations.

Welcome to Smart Cities – Technologies and Institutions

 

Description: Smart cities is one of the current rallying calls with appeals to stakeholders from the information and communication technology areas as well as health, environment, traffic, waste handling, planning, etc. The present course will focus on information and communication technology infrastructures for improving quality of life, mobility, communications etc. in cities. This includes technologies relating to Internet of Things (IoT), cloud computing and broadband including mobile communications. The course aims at examining how such technologies can contribute to solving the abovementioned issues and at discussing the institutional structures that can facilitate these processes. 

Relevant technology developments will be taken up and the potential business set-ups for realizing smart city applications will be discussed. As there are many and diverse providers of potential technology and organizational solutions, standardization developments will be examined. Furthermore, many of the smart city applications will require extensive retrieval and use of data including personal and possibly sensitive data, questions regarding data security and protection will be addressed. Finally, there will be focus on the institutional structures comprising rules and regulations and the organizational foundation. 

The course will address the following topics:

  • Technology solutions and developments
  • Business models and business ecosystems for realizing the visions in the different application areas including modes of public private partnerships
  • Issues relating to technology standardization
  • Issues regarding security and the protection of privacy
  • Facilitating and inhibiting institutional structures

 

Organizer: Associate Professor Reza Tadayoni, email: reza@cmi.aau.dk, Professor Knud Erik Skouby, email: skouby@cmi.aau.dk, and Professor Anders Henten, email: henten@cmi.aau.dk

Lecturers: Associate Professor Reza Tadayoni, Professor Knud Erik Skouby, Professor Anders Henten, and Assistant Professor Per Lynggaard

ECTS: 3

Time: 15. - 17. November 2017

Place: Aalborg University Copenhagen

Zip code: 2450

City: Copenhagen SV

Number of seats: 20

Deadline: 27. October 2017

Important information concerning PhD courses We have over some time experienced problems with no-show for both project and general courses. It has now reached a point where we are forced to take action. Therefore, the Doctoral School has decided to introduce a no-show fee of DKK 5,000 for each course where the student does not show up. Cancellations are accepted no later than 2 weeks before start of the course. Registered illness is of course an acceptable reason for not showing up on those days. Furthermore, all courses open for registration approximately three months before start. This can hopefully also provide new students a chance to register for courses during the year. We look forward to your registrations.